How HBX, Harvard Business School’s Digital Education Initiative, became data-centric with Amazon Redshift

Register for our joint webinar with AWS Redshift on 5/25, showcasing HBX/Harvard Business School

How can you benefit from the excellent education offered by Harvard Business School without actually getting accepted to their renowned full-time MBA program or moving to Boston?

This is the question Harvard Business School was attempting to answer when they formed HBX, the digital education initiative from Harvard Business School. With the unique HBX program, Harvard Business School has reimagined business education for the digital age. The interactive online platform and visionary virtual classroom they have developed, set HBX apart from many online learning options. Both platforms reimagine the learning pedagogy of Harvard Business School, the case method of study, for a digital world. Through the asynchronous online course platform, HBX fosters case-based learning with highly interactive teaching elements, highly-produced video content, and peer help. They have also developed a studio-based virtual classroom with live video feeds for up to 60 people to participate in a synchronous discussion with faculty or others from their own location, wherever they are in the world. You are probably already imagining some of the data implications of this highly sophisticated digital education solution.

You will find it interesting that HBX was created as a separate division within Harvard Business School, forming its own independent technology and development teams so they could move fast and experiment as they explored how to build and deliver new educational models. So effectively, the HBX IT team has experienced similar growth and maturity patterns as typical startup IT teams do. As HBX evolved, they wanted to benefit from data-informed decisions. However, they found that ad hoc analytics and digging for data using custom-coding was not working for them. It was not manageable, scalable or repeatable. Not to mention, it was plain difficult.

HBX realized that they needed to become data-centric in order to really take digital education to the next level at Harvard Business School. By creating a data-driven culture, they expected to enhance student outcomes, increase staff effectiveness and optimize curriculum content and delivery. Becoming data-centric was expected to foster innovation and enable continuous improvement. In order to accomplish this lofty goal, HBX defined a new data management program that would enable them to integrate all relevant data sources into a single trusted data warehouse, build repeatable reports and dashboards, enable self-service analytics and deliver data quality and integrity. All this while ensuring their data management program is agile at the core and can rapidly evolve with their changing business needs.

In their quest to build a modern data management practice that fosters rapid experimentation, HBX elected to implement an agile cloud analytics solution with Amazon Redshift, Informatica Cloud and Tableau. We are super excited to host HBX -Harvard Business School, to tell their story, at our upcoming joint webinar with AWS!

Please join our webinar on May 25, 2017, to learn how HBX, the digital learning initiative of Harvard Business School, became data-centric to deliver an innovative and comprehensive online business learning experience.

In this webinar, you’ll find out how Informatica and Amazon Redshift helped HBX deliver a solution to:

  • Rapidly integrate multiple siloed data sources into a trusted cloud data warehouse.
  • Accelerate agile reporting, dashboarding, and self-service analytics for data-informed business decisions.

In addition, learn how AWS and Informatica can help you deliver your own agile analytics initiative and use the power of scalable cloud data warehousing environments to fuel all your data-centric initiatives.

Register for our joint webinar with AWS Redshift on 5/25, showcasing HBX/Harvard Business School

Please join us!  We look forward to seeing you there!

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