Big Data is Nice to Have, But Big Culture is What Delivers Success

big_data
Big Data is Nice to Have, But Big Culture is What Delivers Success

Despite spending more than $30 Billion in annual spending on Big Data, successful big data implementations elude most organizations. That’s the sobering assessment of a recent study of 226 senior executives from Capgemini, which found that only 13 percent feel they have truly have made any headway with their big data efforts.

The reasons for Big Data’s lackluster performance include the following:

  • Data is in silos or legacy systems, scattered across the enterprise
  • No convincing business case
  • Ineffective alignment of Big Data and analytics teams across the organization
  • Most data locked up in petrified, difficult to access legacy systems
  • Lack of Big Data and analytics skills

Actually, there is nothing new about any of these issues – in fact, the perceived issues with Big Data initiatives so far map closely with the failed expect many other technology-driven initiatives. First, there’s the hype that tends to get way ahead of any actual well-functioning case studies. Second, there’s the notion that managers can simply take a solution of impressive magnitude and drop it on top of their organizations, expecting overnight delivery of profits and enhanced competitiveness.

Technology, and Big Data itself, is but a tool that supports the vision, well-designed plans and hard work of forward-looking organizations. Those managers seeking transformative effects need to look deep inside their organizations, at how deeply innovation is allowed to flourish, and in turn, how their employees are allowed to flourish. Think about it: if line employees suddenly have access to alternative ways of doing things, would they be allowed to run with it? If someone discovers through Big Data that customers are using a product differently than intended, do they have the latitude to promote that new use? Or do they have to go through chains of approval?

Big Data may be what everybody is after, but Big Culture is the ultimate key to success.

For its part, Capgemini provides some high-level recommendations for better baking in transformative values as part of Big Data initiatives, based on their observations of best-in-class enterprises:

The vision thing: “It all starts with vision,” says Capgemini’s Ron Tolido. “If the company executive leadership does not actively, demonstrably embrace the power of technology and data as the driver of change and future performance, nothing digitally convincing will happen. We have not even found one single exception to this rule. The CIO may live and breathe Big Data and there may even be a separate Chief Data Officer appointed – expect more of these soon – if they fail to commit their board of executives to data as the engine of success, there will be a dark void beyond the proof of concept.”

Establish a well-defined organizational structure: “Big Data initiatives are rarely, if ever, division-centric,” the Capgemini report states. “They often cut across various departments in an organization. Organizations that have clear organizational structures for managing rollout can minimize the problems of having to engage multiple stakeholders.”

Adopt a systematic implementation approach:  Surprisingly, even the largest and most sophisticated organizations that do everything on process don’t necessarily approach Big Data this way, the report states. “Intuitively, it would seem that a systematic and structured approach should be the way to go in large-scale implementations. However, our survey shows that this philosophy and approach are rare. Seventy-four percent of organizations did not have well-defined criteria to identify, qualify and select Big Data use-cases. Sixty-seven percent of companies did not have clearly defined KPIs to assess initiatives. The lack of a systematic approach affects success rates.”

Adopt a “venture capitalist” approach to securing buy-in and funding: “The returns from investments in emerging digital technologies such as Big Data are often highly speculative, given the lack of historical benchmarks,” the Capgemini report points out. “Consequently, in many organizations, Big Data initiatives get stuck due to the lack of a clear and attributable business case.” To address this challenge, the report urges that Big Data leaders manage investments “by using a similar approach to venture capitalists. This involves making multiple small investments in a variety of proofs of concept, allowing rapid iteration, and then identifying PoCs that have potential and discarding those that do not.”

Leverage multiple channels to secure skills and capabilities: “The Big Data talent gap is something that organizations are increasingly coming face-to-face with. Closing this gap is a larger societal challenge. However, smart organizations realize that they need to adopt a multi-pronged strategy. They not only invest more on hiring and training, but also explore unconventional channels to source talent. Capgemini advises reaching out to partner organizations for the skills needed to develop Big Data initiatives. These can be employee exchanges, or “setting up innovation labs in high-tech hubs such as Silicon Valley.” Startups may also be another source of Big Data talent.

Comments

  • D.Ed. William B. Thiel

    INTERESTED IN HEARING MORE.