Healthcare Consumer Engagement

The signs that healthcare is becoming a more consumer (think patients, members, Healthcareproviders)  driven industry are evident all around us. I see provider and payer organizations clamoring for more data, specifically data that is actionable, relatable and has integrity. Armed with this data, healthcare organizations are able to differentiate around a member/patient-centric view.

These consumer-centric views convey the total value of the relationships healthcare organizations have with consumers. Understanding the total value creates a more comprehensive understanding of consumers because they deliver a complete picture of an individual’s critical relationships including: patient to primary care provider, member to household, provider to network and even members to legacy plans. This is the type of knowledge that informs new treatments, targets preventative care programs and improves outcomes.

Payer organizations are collecting and analyzing data to identify opportunities for  more informed care management and segmentation to reach new, high value customers in individual markets. By segmenting and targeting messaging to specific populations, health plans generate increased member satisfaction and cost effectively expands and manages provider networks.

How will they accomplish this? Enabling members to interact in health and wellness forums, analyzing member behavior and trends and informing care management programs with a 360 view of members… to name a few . Payers will also drive new member programs, member retention and member engagement marketing and sales programs by investigating complete views of member households and market segments.

In the provider space, this relationship building can be a little more challenging because often consumers as patients do not interact with their doctor unless they are sick, creating gaps in data. When provider organizations have a better understanding of their patients and providers, they can increase patient satisfaction and proactively offer preventative care to the sickest (and most likely to engage) of patients before an episode occurs. These activities result in increased market share and improved outcomes.

Where can providers start? By creating a 360 view of the patient, organizations can now improve care coordination, open new patient service centers and develop patient engagement programs.

Analyzing populations of patients, and fostering patient engagement based on Meaningful Use requirements or Accountable Care requirements, building out referral networks and developing physician relationships are essential ingredients in consumer engagement. Knowing your patients and providing a better patient experience than your competition will differentiate provider organizations.

You may say “This all sounds great, but how does it work?” An essential ingredient is clean, safe and connected data.  Clean, safe and connected data requires an investment in data as an asset… just like you invest in real estate and human capital, you must invest in the accessibility and quality of your data. To be successful, arm your team with tools to govern data –ensuring ongoing integrity and quality of data, removes duplicate records and dynamically incorporates data validation/quality rules. These tools include master data management, data quality, metadata management and are focused on information quality. Tools focused on information quality support a total customer relationship view of members, patients and providers.

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