Stop Asking Your IT for a Roadmap

it_roadmap
IT Roadmap

Knowing business’s trends and needs change frequently, why is it that we plan multi-year IT-driven roadmaps?

Understandably, IT managers have honed their skills in working with the line to predict business needs. They have learned to spend money and time wisely and to have the right infrastructure in place to meet the business’ needs. Whether it is launching in a new market, implementing a new technology, or one of many other areas where IT can help its firm find a competitive advantage.

Not so long ago, IT was so complex and unwieldy that it needed specially-trained professionals to source, build, and run almost every aspect of it, and when line managers had scant understanding which technology would suit their activities best, making a plan based on long-term business goals was a good one.

Today, we talk of IT as a utility, just like electricity, you press a button, and IT turns “on.” However that is not the case, the extent to which IT has saturated the day-to-day business life means they are better placed to determine how technology should be used to achieve the company’s objectives.

In the next five years, the economic climate will change, customer preferences will shift, and new competitors will threaten the business. Innovations in technology will provide new opportunities to explore, and new leadership could send the firm in a new direction. While most organizations have long-term growth targets, their strategies constantly evolve.

This new scenario has caused those in the enterprise architecture (EA) function to ask whether long-term road mapping is still a valuable investment.

EAs admit that long-term IT-led road mapping is no longer feasible. If the business does not have a detailed and stable five-year plan, these architects argue, how can IT develop a technology roadmap to help them achieve it? At best, creating long-term roadmaps is a waste of effort, a never-ending cycle of updates and revisions.

Without a long-range vision of business technology demand, IT has started to focus purely on the supply side. These architects focus on existing systems, identifying ways to reduce redundancies or improve flexibility. However, without a clear connection to business plans, they struggle to secure funding to make their plans a reality.

IT has turned their focus to the near-term, trying to influence the small decisions made every day in their organizations. IT can have greater impact, they believe, if they serve as advisors to IT and business stakeholders, guiding them to make cost-efficient, enterprise-aligned technology decisions.

Rather than taking a top-down perspective, shaping architecture through one master plan, they work from the bottom-up, encouraging more efficient working by influencing the myriad technology decisions being made each day.

Twitter @bigdatabeat

Comments