Solution Patterns for IoT Now

Analysing_IoT
Analysing Internet of Things (IoT)

I have worked with several clients in the Internet of Things space over the last year and really enjoyed all of the engagements.

First, I am not a fan of the term IoT/Internet of Things. It just seems to be a bit too much pie in the sky and marketing. It reminds me a lot of the people who put an “e” or “i” in front of everything in the late 90s and early 00s. To me this is about expanded data integration use cases (e.g. more end points that you have the choice to access), data filtering and processing (e.g. what is the data you actually care about) and work flow/bpm from an enterprise perspective. (can you automate tasks and actions based on data or analysis of data)

There are definitely advancements in technology that are making for some very interesting solutions. My Nest thermostat is really cool, but it’s not really changing the world as one might think from some of the IoT frenzy the last few years. From what I have seen I think there are three main real world solutions that fit under the concept of IoT.

1) Passive Monitoring. This amounts to data collection and filtering. Lots of the consumer facing solutions fall into this category. Wearables, which we are told are super hot or just all the huge amount of big data collection that will then be churned and analyzed or just sit as it builds up. A big issue here is there is a lot of data to collect from an every growing set of end points but more data is not always useful if a company has not set up a process and a way to filter and identify the actual important data. I think the impact on individuals is more real than companies in this segment. I know people who swear they live better because of the data from their CPAP for example.

2) Active Monitoring. Most of these use cases fall into alerting or rule based work flow. There are examples of companies taking existing solutions or evolving existing solutions to then use real-time or near real-time data to drive work flow or alerts to make sure someone actually does something. My next write up is going to focus on an example in this space where a company has creating some really great technology to track usage of a product so they can provide real time view of inventory and then drive either automated replacement orders or work flow for people to do something like order more.

3) Automated response. To me a lot of the so called IoT use cases fall into a re-branding of solutions that have been around for years but now there is a mobile client. This is where all the security, energy (e.g. smart meters) and home automation fit.

Over the next 10 years I could see additional patterns become real, but a lot of the landscape is more hope than real when it comes to IoT from an enterprise company point of view or a how it really impacts a person’s life point of view. Of course I would expect other people would break down the use cases differently and I would love to hear your point of view.

(Note: IoT Landscape Chart is re-posted from work by First Mark Capital’s Matt Turck)

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