Salesforce Lightning Connect and OData: What You Need to Know

Salesforce Lightning Connect and OData
Salesforce Lightning Connect and OData
Last month, Salesforce announced that they are democratizing integration through the introduction of Salesforce1 Lightning Connect. This new capability makes it possible to work with data that is stored outside of Salesforce using the same force.com constructs (SOQL, Apex, VisualForce, etc) that are used with Salesforce objects. The important caveat is that that external data has to be available through the OData protocol, and the provider of that protocol has to be accessible from the internet.

I think this new capability, Salesforce Lightning Connect, is an innovative development and gives OData, an OASIS standard, a leg-up on its W3C-defined competitor Linked Data. OData is a REST-based protocol that provides access to data over the web. The fundamental data model is relational and the query language closely resembles what is possible with stripped-down SQL. This is much more familiar to most people than the RDF-based model using by Linked Data or its SPARQL query language.

Standardization of OData has been going on for years (they are working on version  4), but it has suffered from a bit of a chicken-egg problem. Applications haven’t put a large priority on supporting the consumption of OData because there haven’t been enough OData providers, and data providers haven’t prioritized making their data available through OData because there haven’t been enough consumers. With Salesforce, a cloud leader declaring that they will consume OData, the equation changes significantly.

But these things take time – what does someone do who is a user of Salesforce (or any other OData consumer) if most of their data sources they have cannot be accessed as an OData provider? It is the old last-mile problem faced by any communications or integration technology. It is fine to standardize, but how do you get all the existing endpoints to conform to the standard. You need someone to do the labor-intensive work of converting to the standard representation for lots of endpoints.

Informatica has been in the last-mile business for years. As it happens, the canonical model that we always used has been a relational model that lines up very well with the model used by OData. For us to host an OData provider for any of the data sources that we already support, we only needed to do one conversion from the internal format that we’ve always used to the OData standard. This OData provider capability will be available soon.

But there is also the firewall issue. The consumer of the OData has to be able to access the OData provider. So, if you want Salesforce to be able to show data from your Oracle database, you would have to open up a hole in your firewall that provides access to your database. Not many people are interested in doing that – for good reason.

Informatica Cloud’s Vibe secure agent architecture is a solution to the firewall issue that will also work with the new OData provider. The OData provider will be hosted on Informatica’s Cloud servers, but will have access to any installed secure agents. Agents require a one-time install on-premise, but are thereafter managed from the cloud and are automatically kept up-to-date with the latest version by Informatica . An agent doesn’t require a port to be opened, but instead opens up an outbound connection to the Informatica Cloud servers through which all communication occurs. The agent then has access to any on-premise applications or data sources.

OData is especially well suited to reading external data. However, there are better ways for creating or updating external data. One problem is that Salesforce only handles reads, but even when it does handle writes, it isn’t usually appropriate to add data to most applications by just inserting records in tables. Usually a collection of related information must to be provided in order for the update to make sense. To facilitate this, applications provide APIs that provide a higher level of abstraction for updates. Informatica Cloud Application Integration can be used now to read or write data to external applications from with Salesforce through the use of guides that can be displayed from any Salesforce screen. Guides make it easy to generate a friendly user interface that shows exactly the data you want your users to see and to guide them through the collection of new or updated data that needs to be written back to your app.

Comments

  • Rakesh Boddepalli

    We already have the informatica cloud and salesforce connector license’s. So we would like to know what does it takes us to get the odata license ?