Are The Banks Going to Make Retailers Pay for Their Poor Governance?

 

Retail and Data Governance
Retail and Data Governance

A couple months ago, I reached out to a set of CIOs on the importance of good governance and security. All of them agreed that both were incredibly important. However, one CIO retorted a very pointed remark by saying that “the IT leadership at these breached companies wasn’t stupid.” He continued by saying that when selling the rest of the C-Suite, the discussion needs to be about business outcomes and business benefits.  For this reason, he said that CIOs have struggled at selling the value of investments in governance and security investment. Now I have suggested previously that security pays because of the impact on “brand promise”.  And, I still believe this.

However, this week the ante was raised even higher. A district judge ruled that a group of banks can proceed to sue a retailer for negligence in their data governance and security. The decision could clearly lead to significant changes in the way the cost of fraud is distributed among parties within the credit card ecosystem. Where once banks and merchant acquirers would have shouldered the burden of fraud, this decision paves the way for more card-issuing banks to sue merchants for not adequately protecting their POS systems.

Accidents waste priceless time
Accidents waste priceless time

The judge’s ruling said that “although the third-party hackers’ activities caused harm, merchant played a key role in allowing the harm to occur.” The judge also determined that the bank suit against merchants was valid because the plaintiffs adequately showed that the retailer failed “to disclose that its data security systems were deficient.” This is interesting because it says that security systems should be sufficient and if not, retailers need to inform potentially affected stakeholders of their deficient systems. And while taking this step could avoid a lawsuit, it would likely increase the cost of interchange for more risky merchants. This would effectively create a risk premium for retailers that do not adequately govern and protect their IT environments.

There are broad implications for all companies who end up harming customer, partners, or other stakeholders by not keeping their security systems up to snuff. The question is, will this make good governance have enough of a business outcome and benefit that businesses will actually want to pay it forward — i.e. invest in good governance and security? What do you think? I would love to hear from you.

Related links

Solutions:

Enterprise Level Data Security

Hacking: How Ready Is Your Enterprise?

Gambling With Your Customer’s Financial Data

The State of Data Centric Security

Twitter: @MylesSuer

 

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