Considering Data Integration? Also Consider Data Security Best Practices

Considering Data Integration? Also Consider Data Security
Consider Data Security Best Practices
It seems you can’t go a week without hearing about some major data breach, many of which make front-page news.  The most recent was from the State of California, that reported a large number of data breaches in that state alone.  “The number of personal records compromised by data breaches in California surged to 18.5 million in 2013, up more than six times from the year before, according to a report published [late October 2014] by the state’s Attorney General.”

California reported a total of 167 data breaches in 2013, which is up 28 percent from the 2012.  Two major data breaches caused most of this uptick, including the Target attack that was reported in December 2013, and the LivingSocial attack that occurred in April 2013.  This year, you can add the Home Depot data breach to that list, as well as the recent breach at the US Post Office.

So, what the heck is going on?  And how does this new impact data integration?  Should we be concerned, as we place more and more data on public clouds, or within big data systems?

Almost all of these breaches were made possible by traditional systems with security technology and security operations that fell far enough behind that outside attackers found a way in.  You can count on many more of these attacks, as enterprises and governments don’t look at security as what it is; an ongoing activity that may require massive and systemic changes to make sure the data is properly protected.

As enterprises and government agencies stand up cloud-based systems, and new big data systems, either inside (private) or outside (public) of the enterprise, there are some emerging best practices around security that those who deploy data integration should understand.  Here are a few that should be on the top of your list:

First, start with Identity and Access Management (IAM) and work your way backward.  These days, most cloud and non-cloud systems are complex distributed systems.  That means IAM is is clearly the best security model and best practice to follow with the emerging use of cloud computing.

The concept is simple; provide a security approach and technology that enables the right individuals to access the right resources, at the right times, for the right reasons.  The concept follows the principle that everything and everyone gets an identity.  This includes humans, servers, APIs, applications, data, etc..  Once that verification occurs, it’s just a matter of defining which identities can access other identities, and creating policies that define the limits of that relationship.

Second, work with your data integration provider to identify solutions that work best with their technology.  Most data integration solutions address security in one way, shape, or form.  Understanding those solutions is important to secure data at rest and in flight.

Finally, splurge on monitoring and governance.  Many of the issues around this growing number of breaches exist with the system managers’ inability to spot and stop attacks.  Creative approaches to monitoring system and network utilization, as well as data access, will allow those in IT to spot most of the attacks and correct the issues before the ‘go nuclear.’  Typically, there are an increasing number of breach attempts that lead up to the complete breach.

The issue and burden of security won’t go away.  Systems will continue to move to public and private clouds, and data will continue to migrate to distributed big data types of environments.  And that means the need data integration and data security will continue to explode.

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