Embracing the Hybrid IT World through Cloud Integration

Embracing the Hybrid IT World through Cloud Integration
Embracing Hybrid IT through Cloud Integration
Being here at Oracle Open World, it’s hard not to think about Oracle’s broad scope in enterprise software and the huge influence it wields over our daily work. But even as all-encompassing as Oracle has become, the emergence of the cloud is making us equally reliant on a whole new class of complementary applications and services. During the early era of on-premise apps, different lines of businesses (LOBs) selected the leading application for CRM, ERP, HCM, and so on. In the cloud, it feels like we have come full circle to the point where best of breed cloud applications have been deployed across the enterprise, with the exception that the data models, services and operations are not under our direct control. As a result, Hybrid IT, and the ability to integrate major on-premises applications such as Oracle E-Business, PeopleSoft, and Siebel, to name a few with cloud applications such as Oracle Cloud Applications, Salesforce, Workday, Marketo, SAP Cloud Applications, and Microsoft Cloud Apps, has become one of businesses’ greatest imperatives and challenges.

With Informatica Cloud, we’ve long tracked the growth of the various cloud apps and its adoption in the enterprise. Common business patterns – such as opportunity-to-order, employee onboarding, data migration and business intelligence – that once took place solely on-premises are now being conducted both in the cloud and on-premises.

The fact is that we are well on our way to a world where our business needs are best met by a mix of on-premises and cloud applications. Regardless of what we do or make, we can no longer get away with just on-premises applications – or at least not for long.  As we become more reliant on cloud services, such as those offered by Oracle, Salesforce, SAP, NetSuite, Workday, we are embracing the reality of a new hybrid world, and the imperative for simpler integration it demands.

So, as the ground shifts beneath us, moving us toward the hybrid world, we, as business and IT users, are left standing with a choice: Continue to seek solutions in our existing on-premises integration stacks, or go beyond, to find them with the newer and simpler cloud solution. Let us briefly look at five business patterns we’ve been tracking.

One of the first things we’ve noticed with the hybrid environment is the incredible frequency with which data is moved back and forth between the on-premises and cloud environments. We call this the data integration pattern, and it is best represented by getting data, such as price list or inventory from Oracle E-Business into a cloud app so that the actual user of the cloud app can view the most updated information. Here the data (usually master data) is copied toserves a certain purpose. Data Integration also involves the typical needs of data to be transformed before it can be inserted or updated. The understanding of metadata and data models of the involved applications is key to do this effectively and repeatedly.

The second is the application integration pattern, or the real time transaction flow between your on-premises and cloud environment, where you have business processes and services that need to communicate with one another. Here, the data needs to be referenced in real time for a knowledge worker to take action.

The third, data warehousing in the cloud, is an emerging pattern that is gaining importance for both mid- and large-size companies. In this pattern, businesses are moving massive amounts of data in bulk from both on-premises and cloud sources into a cloud data warehouse, such as Amazon Redshift, for BI analysis.

The fourth, the Internet of Things (IOT) pattern, is also emerging and is becoming more important, especially as new technologies and products, such as Nest, enable us to push streaming data (sensor data, web logs, etc.) and combine them with other cloud and on-premises data sources into a cloud data store. Often the data is unstructured and hence it is critical for an integration platform to effectively deal with unstructured data.

The fifth and final pattern, API integration, is gaining prominence in the cloud. Here, an on-premise or cloud application exposes the data or service as an external API that can be consumed directly by applications or by a higher-level composite app in an orchestration.

While there are certainly different approaches to the challenges brought by Hybrid IT, cloud integration is often best-suited to solving them.

Here’s why.

First, while the integration problems are more or less similar to the on-premise world, the patterns now overlap between cloud and on-premise. Second, integration responsibility is now picked up at the edge, closer to the users, whom we call “citizen integrators”. Third, time to market and agility demands that any integration platform you work with can live up to your expectations of speed. There are no longer multiyear integration initiatives in the era of the cloud. Finally, the same values that made cloud application adoption attractive (such as time-to-value, manageability, low operational overhead) also apply to cloud integration.

One of the most important forces driving cloud adoption is the need for companies to put more power into hands of the business user.  These users often need to access data in other systems and they are quite comfortable going through the motions of doing so without actually being aware that they are performing integration. We call this class of users ‘Citizen Integrators’. For example, if a user uploads an excel file to Salesforce, it’s not something they would call as “integration”. It is an out-of-the-box action that is integrated with their user experience and is simple to use from a tooling point of view and oftentimes native within the application they are working with.

Cloud Integration Convergence is driving many integration use cases. The most common integration – such as employee onboarding – can span multiple integration patterns. It involves data integration, application integration and often data warehousing for business intelligence. If we agree that doing this in the cloud makes sense, the question is whether you need three different integration stacks in the cloud for each integration pattern. And even if you have three different stacks, what if an integration flow involves the comingling of multiple patterns? What we are noticing is a single Cloud Integration platform to address more and more of these use cases and also providing the tooling for both a Citizen Integrator as well as an experienced Integration Developer.

The bottom line is that in the new hybrid world we are seeing a convergence, where the industry is moving towards streamlined and lighter weight solutions that can handle multiple patterns with one platform.

The concept of Cloud Integration Convergence is an important one and we have built its imperatives into our products. With our cloud integration platform, we combine the ability to handle any integration pattern with an easy-to-use interface that empowers citizen integrators, and frees integration developers for more rigorous projects. And because we’re Informatica, we’ve designed it to work in tandem with PowerCenter, which means anything you’ve developed for PowerCenter can be leveraged for Informatica Cloud and vice versa thereby fulfilling Informatica’s promise of Map Once, Deploy Anywhere.

In closing, I invite you to visit us at the Informatica booth at Oracle Open World in booth #3512 in Moscone West. I’ll be there with some of my colleagues, and we would be happy to meet and talk with you about your experiences and challenges with the new Hybrid IT world.