Tag Archives: utilities

Utility Executives: Don’t Waste Millions in Operating Costs Due to Bad Asset Data

“Trying to improve the quality of asset data when you don’t have a solid data management infrastructure in place is like trying to save a sinking boat with a bailing bucket,” explained Dean Balog, a senior principal consultant at Noah Consulting, in this webinar, Attention Utility Executives: Don’t Waste Millions in Operating Costs Due to Bad Asset Data

Dean Balog from Noah Consulting explains how to improve the quality of mission-critical asset data for asset management / equipment maintenance and regulatory reporting, such as rate case submissions.

Dean has 15 years of experience in information management in the utilities industry. In this interview, Dean and I discuss the top issues facing utility executives and how to improve the quality of mission-critical asset data for asset management / equipment maintenance and regulatory reporting, such as rate case submissions.

Q: Dean, what are the top issues facing utility executives?
A: The first issue is asset management / equipment maintenance. Knowing where to invest precious dollars is critical. Utility executives are engaged in a constant tug of war between two competing priorities: replacing aging infrastructure and regular maintenance.

Q. How are utility executives determining that balance?
A. You need to start with facts – the real costs and reliability information for each asset in your infrastructure. Without it, you are guessing. Basically, it is a data problem. Utility executives should ask themselves these questions:

  • Do we have the ability to capture and combine cost and reliability information from multiple sources?  Is it granular enough to be useful?
  • Do we know the maintenance costs of eight-year-old breakers versus three-year-old breakers?
  • Do our meters start failing around the average lifespan? For this example, let us say that is five years. Rather than falling uniformly into that average, do 30% of our meters fail in the first year and the rest last eight years? Those three extra years of life can certainly help out the bottom line.

Knowing your data makes all the difference. The right capital investment strategy requires combining performance, reliability, and cost data.

Quotations about data challenges faced by utility companies

Quotations about data challenges faced by utility companies

Q. Why is it difficult for utility executives to understand the real costs and reliability of assets?
A. I know this does not come as a shock, but most companies do not trust their data. Asset data is often inaccurate, inconsistent, and disconnected. Even the most basic data may not be available. For example, manufacture dates on breakers should be filled in, but they are not. If less than 50% of your breakers have manufacture dates, how can you build a preventative maintenance program? You do not even know what to address first!

A traditional approach to solving this data problem is to do a big data cleanup. You clean the data, and then before you know it, errors creep back in, and the trust in the data you have worked so hard to establish is lost.

I like to illustrate the pain of this issue by using the sinking boat analogy. Data cleanup is like bailing out the water collecting in the bottom of the boat. You think you are solving the problem but more water still seeps into the boat. You cannot stop bailing or you will sink. What you need to do is fix the leaks, and then bail out the boat. But, if you do not lift up your head from bailing long enough to see the leaks and make the right investments, you are fighting a losing battle.

Q. What can utility executives do to improve the quality of asset data?
A. First of all, you need to develop a data governance framework. Going back to the analogy, a data governance framework gives you the structure to find the leaks, fix the leaks, and monitor how much of the water has been bailed out. If the water level is still rising, you have not fixed all the leaks. But having a data governance framework is not the be-all and end-all.

You also need to appoint data stewards to be accountable for establishing and maintaining high quality asset data. The job of a data steward would be easy if there was only one system where all asset data resided. But the fact of the matter is that asset data is fragmented – scattered across multiple systems. Data stewards have a huge responsibility and they need to be supported by a solid data management infrastructure to ease the burden of managing business-critical asset information.

Webinar, Attention Utility Executives Bad Asset Data

If you are responsible for asset management / equipment maintenance or regulatory reporting, particularly rate case submissions, check out this webinar.

Master Data Management (MDM) ensures business-critical asset data is consistent everywhere by pulling together data that is scattered across multiple applications. It manages and masters it in a central location on a continuous basis and shares it with any applications that need that data. MDM provides a user interface and workflow for data stewards to manage the tangled web of names and IDs these assets are known by across systems. It also gives utilities a disciplined approach to manage important relationships between the asset data, such as an asset’s performance reliability and its cost.

Q. Any other pressing issues facing utilities?
A. Yes. Another big issue is tightening regulations that consume investment dollars and become key inputs into rate case submissions and defenses. One of the complicating factors is the number of regulations is not only increasing, but the regulators are also requiring faster implementation times than ever before. So, utilities cannot just do what they have done in the past: throw more people at the problem in the short-term and resolve to fix it later by automating it “when things slow down.” That day never comes.

Q. How can utilities deal with these regulatory pressures?
A. Utilities need a new approach to deal with regulations. Start with the assumption that all data is fair game for regulators. All data must be accessible. You need to be able to report on it, not only to comply with regulations, but for competitive advantage. This requires the high quality asset information we talked about earlier, and an analytical application to:

  • Perform what-if analyses for your asset investment program;
  • Develop regulatory compliance or environmental reports quickly, because the hard work (integrating the data within your MDM program) has already been done; and
  • Get access to granular, observed reliability and cost information using your own utility’s data – not benchmark data that is already a couple of years old and highly summarized.

Q. What is your advice for utility company executives?
A. If you are the one responsible for signing off on regulatory reports and you do not look good in an orange jumpsuit, you need to invest in a plan that includes people, process, and technology to support regulatory reporting and asset management / equipment maintenance.

  • People – Data stewards have clear accountability for the quality of asset data.
  • Process – Data governance is your game plan.
  • Technology – A solid data management infrastructure consisting of data integration, data quality, and master data management is your means.

If you are responsible for asset management / equipment maintenance or regulatory reporting, particularly rate case submissions, check out this webinar, Attention Utility Executives: Don’t Waste Millions in Operating Costs Due to Bad Asset Data

 Our panel of utility data experts:

  • Reveal the five toughest business challenges facing utility industry executives;
  • Explain how bad asset data could be costing you millions of dollars in operating costs;
  • Share three best practices for optimizing asset management / equipment maintenance and regulatory reporting with accurate, consistent, and connected asset information; and
  • Show you how to implement these best practices with a demonstration.

 

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Posted in Data Governance, Data Integration, Data Quality, Enterprise Data Management, Master Data Management, Partners, Utilities & Energy, Vertical | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rich On Data, Poor On Actionable Insight

InformationWeek says companies lack Real-Time Insight

Many companies have built out their data infrastructure, composed of large data warehouses, varying data marts, integration processes, quality controls and much more.  And, it has driven tremendous value in the form of stronger business intelligence, better views of the customer, faster business processes and more.  But, with all the help on the analysis side, where’s the evolution in putting those findings into operational practice. Like quickly identifying that a premium/platinum-level client was put on hold by a customer care agent for more than 5 minutes (and no, the “we are experiencing unusually high call volume” does not let anyone off the hook).

InformationWeek’s May 24, 2010 cover story was titled “Are your Apps Smart Enough” and it prominently featured a BI report card.  Here were the grades: (more…)

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Posted in Business/IT Collaboration, Complex Event Processing, Operational Efficiency, Real-Time | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment