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Informatica and Hortonworks Talk Analytics in Insurance

analytics

Informatica and Hortonworks Talk Analytics in Insurance

On March 25th, Josh Lee, Global Director for Insurance Marketing at Informatica and Cindy Maike, General Manager, Insurance at Hortonworks, will be joining the Insurance Journal in a webinar on “How to Become an Analytics Ready Insurer”.

Register for the Webinar on March 25th at 10am Pacific/ 1pm Eastern

Josh and Cindy exchange perspectives on what “analytics ready” really means for insurers, and today we are sharing some of our views (join the webinar to learn more). Josh and Cindy offer perspectives on the five questions posed here. Please join Insurance Journal, Informatica and Hortonworks on March 25th for more on this exciting topic.

See the Hortonworks site for a second posting of this blog and more details on exciting innovations in Big Data.

  1. What makes a big data environment attractive to an insurer?

CM: Many insurance companies are using new types of data to create innovative products that better meet their customers’ risk needs. For example, we are seeing insurance for “shared vehicles” and new products for prevention services. Much of this innovation is made possible by the rapid growth in sensor and machine data, which the industry incorporates into predictive analytics for risk assessment and claims management.

Customers who buy personal lines of insurance also expect the same type of personalized service and offers they receive from retailers and telecommunication companies. They expect carriers to have a single view of their business that permeates customer experience, claims handling, pricing and product development. Big data in Hadoop makes that single view possible.

JL: Let’s face it, insurance is all about analytics. Better analytics leads to better pricing, reduced risk and better customer service. But here’s the issue. Existing data sources are costly in storing vast amounts of data and inflexible to adapt to changing needs of innovative analytics. Imagine kicking off a simulation or modeling routine one evening only to return in the morning and find it incomplete or lacking data that requires a special request of IT.

This is where big data environments are helping insurers. Larger, more flexible data sets allowing longer series of analytics to be run, generating better results. And imagine doing all that at a fraction of the cost and time of traditional data structures. Oh, and heaven forbid you ask a mainframe to do any of this.

  1. So we hear a lot about Big Data being great for unstructured data.  What about traditional data types that have been used in insurance forever?

CM: Traditional data types are very important to the industry – it drives our regulatory reporting and much of the performance management reporting. This data will continue to play a very important role in the insurance industry and for companies.

However, big data can now enrich that traditional data with new data sources for new insights. In areas such as customer service and product personalization, it can make the difference between cross-selling the right products to meet customer needs and losing the business. For commercial and group carriers, the new data provides the ability to better analyze risk needs, price accordingly and enable superior service in a highly competitive market.

JL: Traditional data will always be around. I doubt that I will outlive a mainframe installation at an insurer; which makes me a little sad. And for many rote tasks like financial reporting, a sales report, or a commission statement, those are sufficient. However, the business of insurance is changing in leaps and bounds. Innovators in data science are interested in correlating those traditional sources to other creative data to find new products, or areas to reduce risk. There is just a lot of data that is either ignored or locked in obscure systems that needs to be brought into the light. This data could be structured or unstructured, it doesn’t matter, and Big Data can assist there.

  1. How does this fit into an overall data management function?

JL: At the end of the day, a Hadoop cluster is another source of data for an insurer. More flexible, more cost effective and higher speed; but yet another data source for an insurer. So that’s one more on top of relational, cubes, content repositories, mainframes and whatever else insurers have latched onto over the years. So if it wasn’t completely obvious before, it should be now. Data needs to be managed. As data moves around the organization for consumption, it is shaped, cleaned, copied and we hope there is governance in place. And the Big Data installation is not exempt from any of these routines. In fact, one could argue that it is more critical to leverage good data management practices with Big Data not only to optimize the environment but also to eventually replace traditional data structures that just aren’t working.

CM: Insurance companies are blending new and old data and looking for the best ways to leverage “all data”. We are witnessing the development of a new generation of advanced analytical applications to take advantage of the volume, velocity, and variety in big data. We can also enhance current predictive models, enriching them with the unstructured information in claim and underwriting notes or diaries along with other external data.

There will be challenges. Insurance companies will still need to make important decisions on how to incorporate the new data into existing data governance and data management processes. The Chief Data or Chief Analytics officer will need to drive this business change in close partnership with IT.

  1. Tell me a little bit about how Informatica and Hortonworks are working together on this?

JL: For years Informatica has been helping our clients to realize the value in their data and analytics. And while enjoying great success in partnership with our clients, unlocking the full value of data requires new structures, new storage and something that doesn’t break the bank for our clients. So Informatica and Hortonworks are on a continuing journey to show that value in analytics comes with strong relationships between the Hadoop distribution and innovative market leading data management technology. As the relationship between Informatica and Hortonworks deepens, expect to see even more vertically relevant solutions and documented ROI for the Informatica/Hortonworks solution stack.

CM: Informatica and Hortonworks optimize the entire big data supply chain on Hadoop, turning data into actionable information to drive business value. By incorporating data management services into the data lake, companies can store and process massive amounts of data across a wide variety of channels including social media, clickstream data, server logs, customer transactions and interactions, videos, and sensor data from equipment in the field.

Matching data from internal sources (e.g. very granular data about customers) with external data (e.g. weather data or driving patterns in specific geographic areas) can unlock new revenue streams.

See this video for a discussion on unlocking those new revenue streams. Sanjay Krishnamurthi, Informatica CTO, and Shaun Connolly, Hortonworks VP of Corporate Strategy, share their perspectives.

  1. Do you have any additional comments on the future of data in this brave new world?

CM: My perspective is that, over time, we will drop the reference to “big” or ”small” data and get back to referring simply to “Data”. The term big data has been useful to describe the growing awareness on how the new data types can help insurance companies grow.

We can no longer use “traditional” methods to gain insights from data. Insurers need a modern data architecture to store, process and analyze data—transforming it into insight.

We will see an increase in new market entrants in the insurance industry, and existing insurance companies will improve their products and services based upon the insights they have gained from their data, regardless of whether that was “big” or “small” data.

JL: I’m sure that even now there is someone locked in their mother’s basement playing video games and trying to come up with the next data storage wave. So we have that to look forward to, and I’m sure it will be cool. But, if we are honest with ourselves, we’ll admit that we really don’t know what to do with half the data that we have. So while data storage structures are critical, the future holds even greater promise for new models, better analytical tools and applications that can make sense of all of this and point insurers in new directions. The trend that won’t change anytime soon is the ongoing need for good quality data, data ready at a moment’s notice, safe and secure and governed in a way that insurers can trust what those cool analytics show them.

Please join us for an interactive discussion on March 25th at 10am Pacific Time/ 1pm Eastern Time.

Register for the Webinar on March 25th at 10am Pacific/ 1pm Eastern

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Big Data Innovation in Analytics (Hadoop) and Hand-coding (Informatica)

I recently had the pleasure of participating in a big data panel at the Pacific Crest investor’s conference (the replay available here.) I was joined on the panel by Hortonworks, MapR, Datastax and Microsoft. There is clearly a lot of interest in the world of big data and how the market is evolving. I came away from the panel with four fundamental thoughts: (more…)

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