Tag Archives: Hadoop

Best Kept Secrets for Successful Data Governance

data governance

Best Kept Secrets for a Successful Data Governance

If you’ve spent some time studying and practicing data governance, you would agree that data governance is a challenging yet rewarding endeavor.  Across industries, a growing number of organizations have put data governance programs in place so they can more effectively manage their data to drive the business value. But the reality is, data governance is a complex process, and most companies practicing data governance today are still at the early phase of this very long journey.  In fact, according to the result from over 240 completed data governance assessments on http://governyourdata.com/, a community website dedicated to everything data governance, the average score for data governance maturity is only 1.6 out of 5. It’s no surprise that data governance was a hot topic at last week’s Informatica World 2015.  Over a dozen presentations and panel discussions on data governance were delivered; practitioners across various industries shared their real-world stories on topics ranging from how to kick-start a data governance program, how to build business cases for data governance, frameworks and stewardship management, to the choice of technologies.  For me, the key takeaways are:

  1. Old but still true – To do data governance the right way, you must start small and focus on achieving tangible results. Leverage the small victories to advance to the next phase.
  1. Be prepared to fail more than once while building a data governance program. But don’t quit, because your data will not.
  1. Why doesn't it fit?!One-size doesn’t fit all when it comes to building a data governance framework, which is a challenge for organizations, as there is no magic formula that companies can immediately adopt. Should you build a centralized or federated data governance operation? Well, that really depends on what works within your existing environment.
    In fact, when asked “what’s the most challenging area for your data governance effort” in our recent survey conducted at Informatica World 2015, “Identify roles and responsibilities” got the most mentions. Basic principle? – Choose a framework that blends well with your company‘s culture.
  1. pptLet’s face it, data governance is not an IT project, nor is it about fixing data problems. It is a business function that calls for people, process and technology working together to obtain the most value from your data. Our seasoned practitioners recommend a systematic approach: Your first priority should be people gathering – identifying the right people with the right skills and most importantly, those who have a passion for data; next is figuring out the process. Things to consider include: What’s the requirement for data quality? What metrics and measurements should be used for examining the data; how to handle exceptions and remediate data issues? How to quickly identify and apply security measures to the various data sets?  Third priority is selecting the right technologies  to implement and facilitate those processes to transform the data so it can be used to help meet  business goals.
  1. Business & IT Collaboration“Engage your business early on” is another important tip from our customers who have achieved early success with their data governance program. A data governance program will not be sustainable without participation from the business. The reason is simple – the business owns the data, they are the consumers of the data and have specific requirements for the data they want to use. IT needs to work collaboratively with business to meet those requirements so the data is fit for use, and provides good value for the business.
  1. Scalability, flexibility and interoperability should be the key considerations when it comes to selecting data governance technologies. Your technology platform should be able to easily adapt to the new requirements arising from the changes in your data environment.  A Big Data project, for example, introduces new data types, increased data speed and volume. Your data management solution should be agile enough to address those new challenges with minimum disruption to your workflow.

Data governance is HOT! The well-attended sessions at Informatica World, as well as some of our previously hosted webinars is testimony of the enthusiasm among our customers, partners, and our own employees on this topic. It’s an exciting time for us at Informatica because we are in a great position to help companies build an effective data governance program. In fact, many of our customers have been relying on our industry-leading data management tools to support their data governance program, and have achieved results in many business areas such as meeting compliance requirements, improving customer centricity and enabling advanced analytics projects. To continue the dialogue and facilitate further learning, I’d like to invite you to an upcoming webinar on May 28, to hear some insightful, pragmatic tips and tricks for building a holistic data governance program from industry expert David Loshin, Principal at Knowledge Integrity, Inc,  and Informatica’s own data governance guru Rob Karel.

Get Ready!

Get Ready!

“Better data is everyone’s job” –  well said by Terri Mikol, director of Data Governance at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.  For companies striving to leverage data to deliver business value, everyone within the company should treat data as a strategic asset and take on responsibilities for delivering clean, connected and safe data. Only then can your organization be considered truly “Data Ready”.

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Visit Us at Hadoop Summit this Week!

Bonjour!

hadoop_summit_logo

Visit Us at Hadoop Summit this Week!

Informatica’s in Brussels this week for Hadoop Summit.  We’re looking forward to spending time with our European customers who are leading the way on repeatably delivering trusted and timely data for big data analytics.

If you’re attending Hadoop Summit Brussels, definitely stop by our session with Belgacom International Carrier Services and our very own Bert Oosterhof to learn how Belgacom is easily driving more predictive analytics and a better customer experience using Informatica and Hadoop.

Europe is clearly becoming a hotbed for increasing use of Hadoop, especially in Telecom, Financial Services, and Public Sector.  As organizations look to extend their information architectures with Hadoop, Informatica can help you repeatably deliver trusted and timely data for big data analytics.

Please stop by our booth at Hadoop Summit to learn more!

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Why Data Integration is Exploding Right Now

Data Integration

Mashing Up Our Business Data with External Data Sources Makes Our Data Even More Valuable.

In case you haven’t noticed, data integration is all the rage right now.  Why?  There are three major reasons for this trend that we’ll explore below, but a recent USA Today story focused on corporate data as a much more valuable asset than it was just a few years ago.  Moreover, the sheer volume of data is exploding.

For instance, in a report published by research company IDC, they estimated that the total count of data created or replicated worldwide in 2012 would add up to 2.8 zettabytes (ZB).  By 2020, IDC expects the annual data-creation total to reach 40 ZB, which would amount to a 50-fold increase from where things stood at the start of 2010.

But the growth of data is only a part of the story.  Indeed, I see three things happening that drive interest in data integration.

First, the growth of cloud computing.  The growth of data integration around the growth of cloud computing is logical, considering that we’re relocating data to public clouds, and that data must be synced with systems that remain on-premise.

The data integration providers, such as Informatica, have stepped up.  They provide data integration technology that can span enterprises, managed service providers, and clouds that dealing with the special needs of cloud-based systems.  Moreover, at the same time, data integration improves the ways we doing data governance, and data quality,

Second, the growth of big data.  A recent IDC forecast shows that the big data technology and services market will grow at a 26.4% compound annual growth rate to $41.5 billion through 2018, or, about six times the growth rate of the overall information technology market. Additionally, by 2020, IDC believes that line of business buyers will help drive analytics beyond its historical sweet spot of relational to the double-digit growth rates of real-time intelligence and exploration/discovery of the unstructured worlds.

The world of big data razor blades around data integration.  The more that enterprises rely on big data, and the more that data needs to move from place to place, the more a core data integration strategy and technology is needed.  That means you can’t talk about big data without talking about big data integration.

Data integration technology providers have responded with technology that keeps up with the volume of data that moves from place to place.  As linked to the growth of cloud computing above, providers also create technology with the understanding  that data now moves within enterprises, between enterprises and clouds, and even from cloud to cloud.  Finally, data integration providers know how to deal with both structured and unstructured data these days.

Third, better understanding around the value of information.  Enterprise managers always knew their data was valuable, but perhaps they did not understand the true value that it can bring.

With the growth of big data, we now have access to information that helps us drive our business in the right directions.  Predictive analytics, for instance, allows us to take years of historical data and determine patterns that allow us to predict the future.  Mashing up our business data with external data sources makes our data even more valuable.

Of course, data integration drives much of this growth.  Thus the refocus on data integration approaches and tech.  There are years and years of evolution still ahead of us, and much to be learned from the data we maintain.

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Posted in B2B, B2B Data Exchange, Big Data, Business/IT Collaboration, Data First, Data Integration, Data Integration Platform, Data Security, Data Services | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Top 5 Big Data Mistakes

Top 5 Big Data mistakes

Top 5 Big Data mistakes

I won’t say I’ve seen it all; I’ve only scratched the surface in the past 15 years. Below are some of the mistakes I’ve made or fixed during this time.

MongoDB as your Big Data platform

Ask yourself, why am I picking on MongoDB? The NoSQL database most abused at this point is MongoDB, while Mongo has an aggregation framework that tastes like MapReduce and even a very poorly documented Hadoop connector, its sweet spot is as an operational database, not an analytical system.

RDBMS schema as files

You dumped each table from your RDBMS into a file and stored that on HDFS, you now plan to use Hive on it. You know that Hive is slower than RDBMS; it’ll use MapReduce even for a simple select. Next, let’s look at row sizes; you have flat files measured in single-digit kilobytes.

Hadoop does best on large sets of relatively flat data. I’m sure you can create an extract that’s more de-normalized.

Data Ponds

Instead of creating a single Data Lake, you created a series of data ponds or a data swamp. Conway’s law has struck again; your business groups have created their own mini-repositories and data analysis processes. That doesn’t sound bad at first, but with different extracts and ways of slicing and dicing the data, you end up with different views of the data, i.e., different answers for some of the same questions.

Schema-on-read doesn’t mean, “Don’t plan at all,” but it means “Don’t plan for every question you might ask.”

Missing use cases

Vendors, to escape the constraints of departmental funding, are selling the idea of the data lake. The byproduct of this is the business lost sight of real use cases. The data-lake approach can be valid, but you won’t get much out of it if you don’t have actual use cases in mind.

It isn’t hard to come up with use cases, but that is always an afterthought. The business should start thinking of the use cases when their databases can’t handle the load.

SQL

You like SQL. Query languages and techniques have changed with time. Today, think of Pig as PL/SQL on steroids with maybe a touch of acid.

To do a larger bit of analytics, you may need a bigger tool set like that may include Hive, Pig, MapReduce, R, and more.

Twitter @bigdatabeat

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Informatica and Hortonworks Talk Analytics in Insurance

analytics

Informatica and Hortonworks Talk Analytics in Insurance

On March 25th, Josh Lee, Global Director for Insurance Marketing at Informatica and Cindy Maike, General Manager, Insurance at Hortonworks, will be joining the Insurance Journal in a webinar on “How to Become an Analytics Ready Insurer”.

Register for the Webinar on March 25th at 10am Pacific/ 1pm Eastern

Josh and Cindy exchange perspectives on what “analytics ready” really means for insurers, and today we are sharing some of our views (join the webinar to learn more). Josh and Cindy offer perspectives on the five questions posed here. Please join Insurance Journal, Informatica and Hortonworks on March 25th for more on this exciting topic.

See the Hortonworks site for a second posting of this blog and more details on exciting innovations in Big Data.

  1. What makes a big data environment attractive to an insurer?

CM: Many insurance companies are using new types of data to create innovative products that better meet their customers’ risk needs. For example, we are seeing insurance for “shared vehicles” and new products for prevention services. Much of this innovation is made possible by the rapid growth in sensor and machine data, which the industry incorporates into predictive analytics for risk assessment and claims management.

Customers who buy personal lines of insurance also expect the same type of personalized service and offers they receive from retailers and telecommunication companies. They expect carriers to have a single view of their business that permeates customer experience, claims handling, pricing and product development. Big data in Hadoop makes that single view possible.

JL: Let’s face it, insurance is all about analytics. Better analytics leads to better pricing, reduced risk and better customer service. But here’s the issue. Existing data sources are costly in storing vast amounts of data and inflexible to adapt to changing needs of innovative analytics. Imagine kicking off a simulation or modeling routine one evening only to return in the morning and find it incomplete or lacking data that requires a special request of IT.

This is where big data environments are helping insurers. Larger, more flexible data sets allowing longer series of analytics to be run, generating better results. And imagine doing all that at a fraction of the cost and time of traditional data structures. Oh, and heaven forbid you ask a mainframe to do any of this.

  1. So we hear a lot about Big Data being great for unstructured data.  What about traditional data types that have been used in insurance forever?

CM: Traditional data types are very important to the industry – it drives our regulatory reporting and much of the performance management reporting. This data will continue to play a very important role in the insurance industry and for companies.

However, big data can now enrich that traditional data with new data sources for new insights. In areas such as customer service and product personalization, it can make the difference between cross-selling the right products to meet customer needs and losing the business. For commercial and group carriers, the new data provides the ability to better analyze risk needs, price accordingly and enable superior service in a highly competitive market.

JL: Traditional data will always be around. I doubt that I will outlive a mainframe installation at an insurer; which makes me a little sad. And for many rote tasks like financial reporting, a sales report, or a commission statement, those are sufficient. However, the business of insurance is changing in leaps and bounds. Innovators in data science are interested in correlating those traditional sources to other creative data to find new products, or areas to reduce risk. There is just a lot of data that is either ignored or locked in obscure systems that needs to be brought into the light. This data could be structured or unstructured, it doesn’t matter, and Big Data can assist there.

  1. How does this fit into an overall data management function?

JL: At the end of the day, a Hadoop cluster is another source of data for an insurer. More flexible, more cost effective and higher speed; but yet another data source for an insurer. So that’s one more on top of relational, cubes, content repositories, mainframes and whatever else insurers have latched onto over the years. So if it wasn’t completely obvious before, it should be now. Data needs to be managed. As data moves around the organization for consumption, it is shaped, cleaned, copied and we hope there is governance in place. And the Big Data installation is not exempt from any of these routines. In fact, one could argue that it is more critical to leverage good data management practices with Big Data not only to optimize the environment but also to eventually replace traditional data structures that just aren’t working.

CM: Insurance companies are blending new and old data and looking for the best ways to leverage “all data”. We are witnessing the development of a new generation of advanced analytical applications to take advantage of the volume, velocity, and variety in big data. We can also enhance current predictive models, enriching them with the unstructured information in claim and underwriting notes or diaries along with other external data.

There will be challenges. Insurance companies will still need to make important decisions on how to incorporate the new data into existing data governance and data management processes. The Chief Data or Chief Analytics officer will need to drive this business change in close partnership with IT.

  1. Tell me a little bit about how Informatica and Hortonworks are working together on this?

JL: For years Informatica has been helping our clients to realize the value in their data and analytics. And while enjoying great success in partnership with our clients, unlocking the full value of data requires new structures, new storage and something that doesn’t break the bank for our clients. So Informatica and Hortonworks are on a continuing journey to show that value in analytics comes with strong relationships between the Hadoop distribution and innovative market leading data management technology. As the relationship between Informatica and Hortonworks deepens, expect to see even more vertically relevant solutions and documented ROI for the Informatica/Hortonworks solution stack.

CM: Informatica and Hortonworks optimize the entire big data supply chain on Hadoop, turning data into actionable information to drive business value. By incorporating data management services into the data lake, companies can store and process massive amounts of data across a wide variety of channels including social media, clickstream data, server logs, customer transactions and interactions, videos, and sensor data from equipment in the field.

Matching data from internal sources (e.g. very granular data about customers) with external data (e.g. weather data or driving patterns in specific geographic areas) can unlock new revenue streams.

See this video for a discussion on unlocking those new revenue streams. Sanjay Krishnamurthi, Informatica CTO, and Shaun Connolly, Hortonworks VP of Corporate Strategy, share their perspectives.

  1. Do you have any additional comments on the future of data in this brave new world?

CM: My perspective is that, over time, we will drop the reference to “big” or ”small” data and get back to referring simply to “Data”. The term big data has been useful to describe the growing awareness on how the new data types can help insurance companies grow.

We can no longer use “traditional” methods to gain insights from data. Insurers need a modern data architecture to store, process and analyze data—transforming it into insight.

We will see an increase in new market entrants in the insurance industry, and existing insurance companies will improve their products and services based upon the insights they have gained from their data, regardless of whether that was “big” or “small” data.

JL: I’m sure that even now there is someone locked in their mother’s basement playing video games and trying to come up with the next data storage wave. So we have that to look forward to, and I’m sure it will be cool. But, if we are honest with ourselves, we’ll admit that we really don’t know what to do with half the data that we have. So while data storage structures are critical, the future holds even greater promise for new models, better analytical tools and applications that can make sense of all of this and point insurers in new directions. The trend that won’t change anytime soon is the ongoing need for good quality data, data ready at a moment’s notice, safe and secure and governed in a way that insurers can trust what those cool analytics show them.

Please join us for an interactive discussion on March 25th at 10am Pacific Time/ 1pm Eastern Time.

Register for the Webinar on March 25th at 10am Pacific/ 1pm Eastern

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Informatica Doubled Big Data Business in 2014 As Hadoop Crossed the Chasm

Big Data

Informatica Doubled Big Data Business in 2014 As Hadoop Crossed the Chasm

2014 was a pivotal turning point for Informatica as our investments in Hadoop and efforts to innovate in big data gathered momentum and became a core part of Informatica’s business. Our Hadoop related big data revenue growth was in the ballpark of leading Hadoop startups – more than doubling over 2013.

In 2014, Informatica reached about 100 enterprise customers of our big data products with an increasing number going into production with Informatica together with Hadoop and other big data technologies.  Informatica’s big data Hadoop customers include companies in financial services, insurance, telcommunications, technology, energy, life sciences, healthcare and business services.  These innovative companies are leveraging Informatica to accelerate their time to production and drive greater value from their big data investments.

These customers are in-production or implementing a wide range of use cases leveraging Informatica’s great data pipeline capabilities to better put the scale, efficiency and flexibility of Hadoop to work.  Many Hadoop customers start by optimizing their data warehouse environments by moving data storage, profiling, integration and cleansing to Hadoop in order to free up capacity in their traditional analytics data warehousing systems. Customers that are further along in their big data journeys have expanded to use Informatica on Hadoop for exploratory analytics of new data types, 360 degree customer analytics, fraud detection, predictive maintenance, and analysis of massive amounts of Internet of Things machine data for optimization of energy exploration, manufacturing processes, network data, security and other large scale systems initiatives.

2014 was not just a year of market momentum for Informatica, but also one of new product development innovations.  We shipped enhanced functionality for entity matching and relationship building at Hadoop scale (a key part of Master Data Management), end-to-end data lineage through Hadoop, as well as high performance real-time streaming of data into Hadoop. We also launched connectors to NoSQL and analytics databases including Datastax Cassandra, MongoDB and Amazon Redshift. Informatica advanced our capabilities to curate great data for self-serve analytics with a connector to output Tableau’s data format and launched our self-service data preparation solution, Informatica Rev.

Customers can now quickly try out Informatica on Hadoop by downloading the free trials for the Big Data Edition and Vibe Data Stream that we launched in 2014.  Now that Informatica supports all five of the leading Hadoop distributions, customers can build their data pipelines on Informatica with confidence that no matter how the underlying Hadoop technologies evolve, their Informatica mappings will run.  Informatica provides highly scalable data processing engines that run natively in Hadoop and leverage the best of open source innovations such as YARN, MapReduce, and more.   Abstracting data pipeline mappings from the underlying Hadoop technologies combined with visual tools enabling team collaboration empowers large organizations to put Hadoop into production with confidence.

As we look ahead into 2015, we have ambitious plans to continue to expand and evolve our product capabilities with enhanced productivity to help customers rapidly get more value from their data in Hadoop. Stay tuned for announcements throughout the year.

Try some of Informatica’s products for Hadoop on the Informatica Marketplace here.

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Informatica and Pivotal Delivering Great Data to Customers

Informatica and Pivotal Delivering Great Data to Customers

Delivering Great Data to Customers

As we head into Strata + Hadoop World San Jose, Pivotal has made some interesting announcements that are sure to be the talk of the show. Pivotal’s move to open-source some of their advanced products (and to form a new organization to foster Hadoop community cooperation) are signs of the dynamism and momentum of the Big Data market.

Informatica applauds these initiatives by Pivotal and we hope that they will contribute to the accelerating maturity of Hadoop and its expansion beyond early adopters into mainstream industry adoption. By contributing HAWQ, GemFire and the Greenplum Database to the open source community, Pivotal creates further open options in the evolving Hadoop data infrastructure technology. We expect this to be well received by the open source community.

As Informatica has long served as the industry’s neutral data connector for more than 5,500 customers and have developed a rich set of capabilities for Hadoop, we are also excited to see efforts to try to reduce fragmentation in the Hadoop community.

Even before the new company Pivotal was formed, Informatica had a long history working with the Greenplum team to ensure that joint customers could confidently use Informatica tools to include the Greenplum Database in their enterprise data pipelines. Informatica has mature and high-performance native connectivity to load data in and out of Greenplum reliably using Informatica’s codeless, visual data pipelining tools. In 2014, Informatica expanded out Hadoop support to include Pivotal HD Hadoop and we have joint customers using Informatica to do data profiling, transformation, parsing and cleansing using Informatica Big Data Edition running on Pivotal HD Hadoop.

We expect these innovative developments driven by Pivotal in the Big Data technology landscape to help to move the industry forward and contribute to Pivotal’s market progress. We look forward to continuing to support Pivotal technology and to an ever increasing number of successful joint customers. Please reach out to us if you have any questions about how Informatica and Pivotal can help your organization to put Big Data into production. We want to ensure that we can help you answer the question … Are you Big Data Ready?

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Data Streams, Data Lakes, Data Reservoirs, and Other Large Data Bodies

data lake

Data Lake is a catchment area for data entering the organization

A Data Lake is a simple concept. They are a catchment area for data entering the organization. In the past, most businesses didn’t need to organize such a data store because almost all data was internal. It traveled via traditional ETL mechanisms from transactional systems to a data warehouse and then was sprayed around the business, as required.

When a good deal of data comes from external sources, or even from internal sources like log files, which never previously made it into the data warehouse, there is a need for an “operational data store.” This has definitely become the premier application for Hadoop and it makes perfect sense to me that such technology be used for a data catchment area. The neat thing about Hadoop for this application is that:

  1. It scales out “as far as the eye can see,” so there’s no likelihood of it being unable to manage the data volumes even when they grow beyond the petabyte level.
  2. It is a key-value store, which means that you don’t need to expend much effort in modeling data when you decide to accommodate a new data source. You just define a key and define the metadata at leisure.
  3. The cost of the software and the storage is very low.

So let’s imagine that we have a need for a data catchment area, because we have decided to collect data from log-files, mobile devices, social networks, from public data sources, or whatever. So let us also imagine that we have implemented Hadoop and some of its useful components and we have begun to collect data.

Is it reasonable to describe this as a data lake?

A Hadoop implementation should not be a set of servers randomly placed at the confluence of various data flows. The placement needs to be carefully considered and if the implementation is to resemble a “data lake” in any way, then it must be a well-engineered man-made lake. Since the data doesn’t just sit there until it evaporates but eventually flows to various applications, we should think of this as a “data reservoir” rather than a “data lake.”

There is no point in arranging all that data neatly along the aisles because when we get it, we may not know what we want to do with it at the time we get it. We should organize the data when we know that.

Another reason we should think of this as more like a reservoir than a lake is that we might like to purify the data a little before sending it down the pipes to applications or users that want to use it.

Twitter @bigdatabeat

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Big Data Is Neither-Part II

Big_DataYou Say Big Dayta, I say Big Dahta

Some say Big Data is a great challenge while others say Big Data creates new opportunities. Where do you stand?  For most companies concerned with their Big Data challenges, it shouldn’t be so difficult – at least on paper. Computing costs (both hardware and software) have vastly shrunk. Databases and storage techniques have become more sophisticated and scale massively, and companies such as Informatica have made connecting and integrating all the “big” and disparate data sources much easier and have helped companies achieve a sort of “big data synchronicity”. As it is.

In the process of creating solutions to Big Data problems, humans (and the supra-species known as IT Sapiens) have a tendency to use theories based on linear thinking and the scientific method. There is data as our systems know it and data as our systems don’t. The reality, in my opinion, is that “Really Big Data” problems now and in the future will have complex correlations and unintuitive relationships that need to utilize mathematical disciplines, data models and algorithms that haven’t even been discovered or invented yet and when eventually discovered, will make current database science positively primordial.

At some point in the future, machines will be able to predict, based on big, perhaps unknown data types when someone is having a bad day or a good day, or more importantly whether a person may behave in a good or bad way. Many people do this now when they take a glance at someone across a room and infer how that person is feeling or what they will do next. They see eyes that are shiny or dull, crinkles around eyes or sides of mouths, then hear the “tone” in a voice and then their neurons put it altogether that this is a person that is having a bad day and needs a hug. Quickly. No one knows exactly how the human brain does this, but it does what it does and we go with it and we are usually right.

U.S._Air_Force_Senior_Airman__130429-F-ZX232-013

And some day, Big Data will be able to derive this and it will be an evolution point and it will also be a big business opportunity. Through bigger and better data ingestion and integration techniques and more sophisticated math and data models, a machine will do this fast and relatively speaking, cheaply. The vast majority won’t understand why or how it’s done, but it will work and it will be fairly accurate.

And my question to you all is this.

Do you see any other alternate scenarios regarding the future of big data? Is contextual computing an important evolution and will big data integration be more or less of a problem in the future.

PS. Oh yeah, one last thing to chew on concerning Big Data… If Big Data becomes big enough, does that spell the end of modelling as we know it?

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Big Data Is Neither-Part I

humongdataI’ve been having some interesting conversations with work colleagues recently about the Big Data hubbub and I’ve come to the conclusion that “Big Data” as hyped is neither, really. In fact, both terms are relative. “Big” 20 years ago to many may have been 1 terabyte. “Data” 20 years ago may have been Flat files, Sybase, Oracle, Informix, SQL Server or DB2 tables. Fast forward to today and “Big” is now Exabytes (or millions of terabytes). “Data” are now expanded to include events, sensors, messages, RFID, telemetry, GPS, accelerometers, magnetometers, IoT / M2M and other new and evolving data classifications.

And then there’s social and search data.

Surely you would classify Google data as really really big data – I can tell when I do a search, and get 487,464,685 answers within fractions of a second that they appear to have gotten a handle on their big data speeds and feeds. However, it’s also telling that nearly all of those bazillion results are actually not relevant to what I am searching for.

My conclusion is that if you have the right algorithms, invest in and use the right hardware and software technology and make sure to measure the pertinent data sources, harnessing big data can yield speedy &“big”results.

So what’s the rub then?

It usually boils down to having larger and more sophisticated data stores and still not understanding its structure, OR it can’t be integrated into cohesive formats, OR there is important hidden meaning in the data that we don’t have the wherewithal to derive, see or understand a la Google? So how DO you find the timely and important information out of your company’s big data (AKA the needle in the haystack)?

needlehaystack-Big Data

More to the point, how do you better ingest, integrate, parse, analyze, prepare, and cleanse your data to get the speed, but also the relevancy in a Big Data world?

Hadoop related tools are one of the current technologies of choice when it comes to solving Big Data related problems, and as an Informatica customer, you can leverage these tools, regardless of whether it’s Big Data or Not So Big Data, fast data or slow data. In fact, it actually astounds me that many IT professionals would want to go back to hand coding with a Hadoop tool just because they don’t know that the tools to do so are right under their nose, installed and running in their familiar Informatica User Interface (AND that work with Hadoop right out of the box.)

So what does your company get out of using Informatica in conjunction with Hadoop tools? Namely, better customer service and responsiveness, better operational efficiencies, more effective supply chains, better governance, service assurance, and the ability to discover previously unknown opportunities as well as stopping problems when they are an issue – not after the fact. In other words, Big Data done right can be a great advantage to many of today’s organizations.

Much more to say on this this subject as I delve into the future of Big Data. For more, see Part 2.

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