Tag Archives: firewalls

Data Security from the Inside—Out

Earlier this week I met with security leaders at some of the largest organizations in the San Francisco Bay Area.  They highlighted disturbing trends, in addition to the increased incidence of breaches they see increased:

-          Numbers of customer who want to do security audits of their company

-          Number of RFPs in which information is required about data security

-          Litigation from data security breaches— and occurrences of class action lawsuits—as opposed to regulatory fines driving concerns

So much attention has been placed on defending the perimeter that many organizations feel they are in an arms race. Part of the problem is that it’s not clear how effective the firewalls are. While firewalls may be a part of the solution, organizations are increasingly looking at how to make their applications bulletproof and centralize controls. One of the high risk areas are systems where people have more access than they need to.

For example, many organizations have created copies of production environments for test, development and training purposes. As a result this data can be completely exposed and the confidential aspects are at risk of being leaked intentionally or unintentionally. I spoke to a customer a couple of weeks ago who had tried to change the email addresses in their test database. But they missed a few.  As a result, during a test run, they sent their customers emails. Their customers called back and asked what was going on. That was when we started talking to them about a masking solution that would permanently mask the data in these environments. In this way they would have the best data to test with and all sensitive details obliterated.

Another high risk area is with certain users, for example cloud administrators, who have access to all data in the clear. As a result, the administrators have access to account numbers and social security numbers that they don’t need in order to do their jobs. Here, masking these values would enable them to still see the passwords they need to do their jobs. But it would prevent the breach of the other confidential data.

Going back to the concerns the security leaders had, how do you prove to your customers that you have data security? Especially, if it’s difficult to prove the effectiveness of a firewall? This is where reports on what data was masked and what it was masked to comes in. Yes, you can pay for cyberinsurance to cover your losses for when you have a breach. But wouldn’t it be better to prevent the breaches in the first place and showing how you’ve done it? Try looking at the problem from the inside—out.

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Posted in Application ILM, Big Data, Data masking, Data Privacy, Financial Services, Governance, Risk and Compliance, Healthcare, SaaS | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment