Tag Archives: enterprise architect

Why Enterprise Architects Need to Think About Data First

Enterprise Architects Need to Think About Data First

Enterprise Architects: Think “Data First”

Enterprise Architects (EAs) are increasingly being asked to think 3-5 years out.  This means that they need to take an even more active part in the strategy process, and to help drive business transformation.  A CIO that we talked to recently said;

 “Enterprise Architecture needs to be the forward, business facing component of IT.  Architects need to create a regular structure for IT based on the service and product line functions/capabilities. They need to be connected to their business counterparts. They need to be so tied to the product and service road map that they can tie changes directly to the IT roadmap. Often times, I like to pair a Chief Business Strategist with a Chief Enterprise Architect”.

To get there, Enterprise Architects are going to have to think differently about enterprise architecture. Specifically, they need think “data first” to break through the productivity barrier and deliver business value in the time frame that business requires it.

IT is Not Meeting the Needs of the Business

A study by McKinsey and Company has found that IT is not delivering in the time frame that business requires.  Even worse, the performance ratings have been dropping over the past three years.  And even worse than that, 20% of the survey respondents are calling for a change in IT leadership.

Our talks with CIOs and Enterprise Architects tell us that the ability to access, manage and deliver data on a timely basis is the biggest bottleneck in the process of delivering business initiatives.  Gartner predicts that by 2018, more than half the cost of implementing new large systems will be spent on integration.

The Causes: It’s Only Going to Get Worse

Data needs to be easily discoverable and sharable across multiple uses.  Today’s application-centric architectures do not provide that flexibility. This means any new business initiative is going to be slowed by issues relating to finding, accessing, and managing data.  Some of the causes of problems will include:

  • Data Silos: Decades of applications-focused architecture have left us with unconnected “silos of data.”
  • Lack of Data Management Standards: The fact is that most organizations do not manage data as a single system. This means that they are dealing with a classic “spaghetti diagram” of data integration and data management technologies that are difficult to manage and change.
  • Growth of Data Complexity: There is a coming explosion of data complexity: partner data, social data, mobile data, big data, Internet of Things data.
  • Growth of Data Users: There is also a coming explosion of new data users, who will be looking to self-service.
  • Increasing Technology Disruption:  Gartner predicts that we are entering a period of increased technology disruption.

Looking forward, organizations are increasingly running on the same few enterprise applications and those applications are rapidly commoditizing.  The point is that there is little competitive differentiation to be had from applications.  The only meaningful and sustainable competitive differentiation will come from your data and how you use it.

Recommendations for Enterprise Architects

  1. Think “data first” to accelerate business value delivery and to drive data as your competitive advantage. Designing data as a sharable resource will dramatically accelerate your organization’s ability to produce useful insights and deliver business initiatives.
  2. Think about enterprise data management as a single system.  It should not be a series of one-off, custom, “works of art.”  You will reduce complexity, save money, and most importantly speed the delivery of business initiatives.
  3. Design your data architecture for speed first.  Do not buy into the belief that you must accept trade-offs between speed, cost, or quality. It can be done, but you have to design your enterprise data architecture to accomplish that goal from the start.
  4. Design to know everything about your data. Specifically, gather and carefully manage all relevant metadata.  It will speed up data discovery, reduce errors, and provide critical business context.  A full compliment of business and technical metadata will enable recommendation #5.
  5. Design for machine-learning and automation. Your data platform should be able to automate routine tasks and intelligently accelerate more complex tasks with intelligent recommendations.  This is the only way you are going to be able to meet the demands of the business and deal with the growing data complexity and technology disruptions.

Technology disruption will bring challenges and opportunities.  For more on this subject, see the Informatica eBook, Think ‘Data First’ to Drive Business Value.

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Posted in Data Services, Enterprise Data Management | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Enterprise Architects as Strategists

Data Architecture

The conversation at the Gartner Enterprise Architecture Summit was very interesting last week. They central them for years had been idea of closely linking enterprise architecture with the goals and strategy.  This year, Gartner added another layer to that conversation.  They are now actively promoting the idea of enterprise architects as strategists.

The reason why is simple.  The next wave of change is coming and it will significantly disrupt everybody.  Even worse, your new competitors may be coming from other industries.

Enterprise architects are in a position to take a leading role within the strategy process. This is because they are the people who best understand both business strategy and technology trends.

Some of the key ideas discussed included:

  • The boundaries between physical and digital products will blur
  • Every organization will need a technology strategy to survive
  • Gartner predicts that by 2017: 60% of the Global 1,000 will execute on at least one revolutionary and currently unimaginable business transformation effort.
  • The change is being driven by trends such as mobile, social, the connectedness of everything, cloud/hybrid, software-defined everything, smart machines, and 3D printing.

Observations

I agree with all of this.  My view is that this means that it is time for enterprise architects to think very differently about architecture.  Enterprise applications will come and go.  They are rapidly being commoditized in any case.  They need to think like strategists; in terms of market differentiation.  And nothing will differentiate an organization more than their data.    Example: Google autonomous cars.  Google is jumping across industry boundaries to compete in a new market with data as their primary differentiator. There will be many others.

Thinking data-first

Years of thinking of architecture from an application-first or business process-first perspective have left us with silos of data and the classic ‘spaghetti diagram” of data architecture. This is slowing down business initiative delivery precisely at the time organizations need to accelerate and make data their strategic weapon.  It is time to think data-first when it comes to enterprise architecture.

You will be seeing more from Informatica on this subject over the coming weeks and months.

Take a minute to comment on this article.  Your thoughts on how we should go about changing to a data-first perspective, both pro and con are welcomed.

Also, remember that Informatica is running a contest to design the data architecture of the year 2020.  Full details are here.

http://www.informatica.com/us/architects-challenge/

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Posted in Architects, CIO, Data Integration, Data Integration Platform, Enterprise Data Management | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Data Architect: A Role Whose Time Has Finally Arrived

Is data architect a role that’s interchangeable with enterprise architect? Many observers see the two roles are overlapping to some degree. However, perhaps it’s time that data architecture be recognized for having a distinct role in today’s enterprises.

With the rise of service oriented architecture and distributed computing, enterprise architects have been emerging as key players in their organizations – assuring that applications and systems are designed within a coherent framework and follow a roadmap designed with the business in mind. Now, the same discipline needs to apply to an enterprise’s data resources. (more…)

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Posted in Business/IT Collaboration, Data Governance, Data Integration, Data Services, Enterprise Data Management, Integration Competency Centers, SOA | Tagged | 4 Comments

Five Things to Look For When Hiring an Enterprise Architect (Part 1)

Judy Ko recently discussed the difficulties business users have communicating with technical staff, and visa-versa. “How many of us have spent days or even weeks in tedious requirements gathering sessions, asking what the business wants, and getting very fuzzy answers back?” she asked, taking the technical side. Conversely, business people frequently complain that technical folks speak a different, strange language. This makes key enterprise projects such as data warehousing, SOA, or data integration that much more difficult, if not impossible, to implement. (more…)

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Posted in Data Integration, Integration Competency Centers | Tagged | 3 Comments