Tag Archives: EIM

The Five C’s of Data Management

The Five C’s of Data Management

The Five C’s of Data Management

A few days ago, I came across a post, 5 C’s of MDM (Case, Content, Connecting, Cleansing, and Controlling), by Peter Krensky, Sr. Research Associate, Aberdeen Group and this response by Alan Duncan with his 5 C’s (Communicate, Co-operate, Collaborate, Cajole and Coerce). I like Alan’s list much better. Even though I work for a product company specializing in information management technology, the secret to successful enterprise information management (EIM) is in tackling the business and organizational issues, not the technology challenges. Fundamentally, data management at the enterprise level is an agreement problem, not a technology problem.

So, here I go with my 5 C’s: (more…)

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Posted in Application ILM, Big Data, Data Governance, Data Integration, Enterprise Data Management, Integration Competency Centers, Master Data Management | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Does Your Organization Have the Data Architecture to Succeed?

Does Your Organization Have the Data Architecture to Succeed

Does Your Org Have the Data Architecture to Succeed?

Adrian Gates was facing a major career challenge. Auditors hired by his company, Major Healthcare, to assess the risks the company faces, came back with “data quality” as the #1 risk. Adrian had been given the job of finding out exactly what the “data quality” issue was and how to address it.

Adrian gathered experts and built workgroups to dig into the issue and do root cause analysis.  The workgroups came back with some pretty surprising results. 

  • Most people expected  that “incorrect data” (missing, out of date, incomplete, or wrong data) would be the main problem.  What they found was that this was only #5 on the list of issues.
  • The #1 issue was “Too much data.”  People working with the data could not find the data they needed because there was too much data available, and it was hard to figure out which was the data they needed.
  • The #2 issue was that people did not know the meaning of data.  And because people had different interpretations of the data, the often produced analyses with conflicting results.  For example, “claims paid date” might mean the date the claim was approved, the date the check was cut or the date the check cleared. These different interpretations resulted in significantly different numbers.
  • In third place was the difficulty in accessing the data.  Their environment was a forest of interfaces, access methods and security policies.   Some were documented and some not.

In one of the workgroups, a senior manager put the problem in a larger business context;

 “Not being able to leverage the data correctly allows competitors to break ground in new areas before we do. Our data in my opinion is the ‘MOST’ important element for our organization.”

What started as a relatively straightforward data quality project became a more comprehensive enterprise data management initiative that could literally change the entire organization.  By the project’s end, Adrian found himself leading the data strategy of the organization. 

This kind of story is happening with increasing frequency across all industries as all businesses become more digital, the quantity and complexity of data grows, and the opportunities to offer differentiated services based on data grow.  We are entering an era of data-fueled organizations where the competitive advantage will go to those who use their data ecosystem better than their competitors.

Gartner is predicting that we are entering an era of increased technology disruption.  Organizations that focus on data as their competitive edge will have the advantage.  It has become clear that a strong enterprise data architecture is central to the strategy of any industry-leading organization.

For more future-thinking on the subject of enterprise data management and data architecure see Think ‘Data First” to Drive Business Value                

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Posted in Architects, CIO, Data Integration Platform, Enterprise Data Management | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

To Engage Business, Focus on Information Management rather than Data Management

Focus on Information Management

Focus on Information Management

IT professionals have been pushing an Enterprise Data Management agenda for decades rather than Information Management and are frustrated with the lack of business engagement. So what exactly is the difference between Data Management and Information Management and why does it matter? (more…)

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Posted in Architects, Business Impact / Benefits, Business/IT Collaboration, CIO, Data Governance, Data Integration, Enterprise Data Management, Integration Competency Centers, Master Data Management | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Enterprise Architects as Strategists

Data Architecture

The conversation at the Gartner Enterprise Architecture Summit was very interesting last week. They central them for years had been idea of closely linking enterprise architecture with the goals and strategy.  This year, Gartner added another layer to that conversation.  They are now actively promoting the idea of enterprise architects as strategists.

The reason why is simple.  The next wave of change is coming and it will significantly disrupt everybody.  Even worse, your new competitors may be coming from other industries.

Enterprise architects are in a position to take a leading role within the strategy process. This is because they are the people who best understand both business strategy and technology trends.

Some of the key ideas discussed included:

  • The boundaries between physical and digital products will blur
  • Every organization will need a technology strategy to survive
  • Gartner predicts that by 2017: 60% of the Global 1,000 will execute on at least one revolutionary and currently unimaginable business transformation effort.
  • The change is being driven by trends such as mobile, social, the connectedness of everything, cloud/hybrid, software-defined everything, smart machines, and 3D printing.

Observations

I agree with all of this.  My view is that this means that it is time for enterprise architects to think very differently about architecture.  Enterprise applications will come and go.  They are rapidly being commoditized in any case.  They need to think like strategists; in terms of market differentiation.  And nothing will differentiate an organization more than their data.    Example: Google autonomous cars.  Google is jumping across industry boundaries to compete in a new market with data as their primary differentiator. There will be many others.

Thinking data-first

Years of thinking of architecture from an application-first or business process-first perspective have left us with silos of data and the classic ‘spaghetti diagram” of data architecture. This is slowing down business initiative delivery precisely at the time organizations need to accelerate and make data their strategic weapon.  It is time to think data-first when it comes to enterprise architecture.

You will be seeing more from Informatica on this subject over the coming weeks and months.

Take a minute to comment on this article.  Your thoughts on how we should go about changing to a data-first perspective, both pro and con are welcomed.

Also, remember that Informatica is running a contest to design the data architecture of the year 2020.  Full details are here.

http://www.informatica.com/us/architects-challenge/

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Posted in Architects, CIO, Data Integration, Data Integration Platform, Enterprise Data Management | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Three Ingredients of Enterprise Information Management

Information Management

Enterprise Information Management

There is no shortage of buzzwords that speak to the upside and downside of data.  Big Data, Data as an Asset, the Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, One Version of the Truth, Data Breach, Black Hat Hacking, and so on. Clearly we are in the Information Age as described by Alvin Toffler in The Third Wave. But yet, most organizations are not effectively dealing with the risks of a data-driven economy nor are they getting the full benefits of all that data. They are stuck in a fire-fighting mode where each information management opportunity or problem is a one-time event that is man-handled with heroic efforts. There is no repeatability. The organization doesn’t learn from prior lessons and each business unit re-invents similar solutions. IT projects are typically late, over budget, and under delivered. There is a way to break out of this rut. (more…)

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Posted in CIO, Data Integration, Enterprise Data Management, Integration Competency Centers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Announcing the Informatica Architect’s Challenge

Informatica Architect Challenge

What would the ideal data architecture of the year 2020 look like?

Informatica want’s to know how YOU would answer that question. For this reason, we’ve created the Informatica Architect’s Challenge, a chance for YOU to share how you would approach enterprise data architecture differently. Send us your proposal and you could win 100 iPad Minis for the school of your choice.

There are a lot of challenges to think about here, but let’s start with these:

  • Organizations are requiring dramatically faster delivery of business initiatives and are unhappy with the current performance of IT.  Think this is “marketing hyperbole?” See the McKinsey survey
  • Data in most organizations is highly fragmented and scattered across dozens or hundreds of different systems.  Simply finding and prepping data is becoming the majority of the work in any IT project.
  • The problem is only going to get worse as cloud, 3rd party data, social, mobile, big data, and the Internet of Things dramatically increase the complexity of enterprise data environments.

Data is the one thing that uniquely differentiates your organization from its competitors.  The question is:  How you are going to architect to deliver the data to fuel your future business success?  How will you manage the challenges of increasing complexity while delivering with the speed your organization requires?

It’s a chance make a positive contribution for education, while at the same time gaining some professional visibility for yourself as a thought leader.  We can’t wait to see what you’ll create!

For additional details, please visit the Informatica Architect’s Challenge official page.

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Posted in Data Integration, Data Integration Platform, Enterprise Data Management | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

If you Want Business to “Own” the Data, You Need to Build An Architecture For the Business

If you build an IT Architecture, it will be a constant up-hill battle to get business users and executives engaged and take ownership of data governance and data quality. In short you will struggle to maximize the information potential in your enterprise. But if you develop and Enterprise Architecture that starts with a business and operational view, the dynamics change dramatically. To make this point, let’s take a look at a case study from Cisco. (more…)

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Posted in Business Impact / Benefits, Business/IT Collaboration, CIO, Data Governance, Data Integration, Enterprise Data Management, Governance, Risk and Compliance, Integration Competency Centers | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

One-Click Data Management

There are three reasons why we haven’t achieved 1-click data management in a corporate data marketplace. First, it wasn’t a problem until recently.  The signs that we really needed to manage data as an asset across the enterprise only appeared about 20 years ago.  Prior to that, data management occurred at the application system level and we didn’t need a separate focus on Information Asset Management (IAM) at the enterprise level.  The past five years however have a seen a strong growing awareness of the challenges and need for IAM; to a large degree driven by big-data opportunities and data privacy and confidentiality concerns. (more…)

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Posted in Business/IT Collaboration, Data Governance, Data Integration, Data Integration Platform, Enterprise Data Management, Integration Competency Centers | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

CIO Top 5×2: Part 1

I was cleaning up my office last week, and I started flipping through my rather large backlog of CIO magazines.  I hadn’t touched the stack in months, since I usually read the online version.  But luckily I took a moment to scan the headlines, as I came across a couple items I hadn’t spent enough time on earlier:  their annual State of the CIO survey, as well as a January survey regarding their “top tech priorities”.

These two surveys provided some interesting insights into the top day-to-day priorities for CIOs, as well as the future things they are keeping their eyes on.  In this posting, I’ll talk about the lynchpin role enterprise information management (EIM) plays in the day-to-day running of the ship. In my next post I’ll talk about how EIM interplays with the various technologies that are at the top of the list for future investment.
From the 2010 State of the CIO survey, the top five management priorities were:
1.    Aligning IT and business goals
2.    Controlling IT costs
3.    IT governance and portfolio management
4.    Business process redesign
5.    Leadership development/staff training (more…)

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Posted in Business/IT Collaboration, CIO, Cloud Computing, Data Governance, Data Integration Platform, Operational Efficiency | Tagged , | Leave a comment