Tag Archives: CFO

CFO Checklist to Owning Enterprise Analytics

Frank-FriedmanLast month, the CEO of Deloitte said that CFOs are “the logical choice to own analytics and put them to work to serve the organization’s needs”. In my discussions with CFOs, they have expressed similar opinions.  Given this, the question becomes what does a CFO need to do to be effective leader of their company’s analytics agenda? To answer this, I took a look at what Tom Davenport suggests in his book “Analytics at Work”. In this book, Tom suggests that an analytical leader need to do the following twelve things to be effective:

12 Ways to Be an Effective Analytics Leader

1)      Develop their people skills. This is not just about managing analytical people which has its own challenges. It is, also, about CFOs establishing the “the credibility and trust needed when analytics produce insights that effectively debunk currently accepted wisdom”.
2)      Push for fact based decision making. You need to, as a former boss of mine like to say, become the lightening rod and in this case, set the expectation that people will make decisions based upon data and analysis.
3)      Hire and retain smart people. You need to provide a stimulating and supportive work environment for analysts and give them credit when they do something great.
4)      Be the analytical example. You need to lead by example. This means you need to use data and analysis in making your own decisions
5)      Signup for improved results. You need to commit to driving improvements in a select group of business processes by using analytics. Pick something meaningful ike reducing the cost of customer acquisition or optimizing your company’s supply chain management.
6)      Teach the organization how to use analytic methods. Guide employees and other stakeholders into using more rigorous thinking and decision making.
7)      Set strategies and performance expectations. Analytics and fact-based decisions cannot happen in a vacuum. They need strategies and goals that analytics help achieve.
8)      Look for leverage points. Look for the business problems where analytics can make a real difference. Look for places where a small improvement in a process driven by analytics can make a big difference.
9)      Demonstrate persistence. Work doggedly and persistently to apply analytics to decision making, business processes, culture, and business strategy.
10)   Build an analytics ecosystem with your CIO. Build an ecosystem consisting of other business leaders, employees, external analytics suppliers, and business partners. Use them to help you institutionalize analytics at your company.
11)    Apply analytics on more than one front. No single initiative will make the company more successful—no single analytics initiative will do so either.
12)   Know the limits to analytics. Know when it is appropriate to use intuition instead of analytics. As a professor of mine once said not all elements of business strategy can be solved by using statistics or analytics. You should know where and when analytics are appropriate.

Data AnalyticsFollowing these twelve items will help strategic oriented CFOs lead the analytics agenda at their companies. As I indicated in “Who Owns the Analytics Agenda?”, CFOs already typically act as data validators at their firms, but taking this next step matters to their enterprise because “if we want to make better decisions and take the right actions, we have use analytics” (Analytics at Work, Tom Davenport, Harvard Business Review Press, page 1). Given this, CFOs really need to get analytics right. The CFOs that I have talked to say they already “rely on data and analytics and they need them to be timely and accurate”.

One CFO, in fact, said that data is potentially the only competitive advantage left for his firm”. And while implementing the data side of this depends on the CIO. It is clear from the CFOs that I have talked to that they believe a strong business relationship with their CIO is critical to the success of their business.

Enterprise DataSo the question remains are you ready as a financial leader to lead on the analytics agenda? If you are and you want to learn more about setting the analytics agenda, please consider yourself invited to webinar that I am doing with the CFO of RoseRyan in January.

The Webinar is entitled “Analytics and Data for the Strategic CFO”. And by clicking this link you can register to attend. See you there.

Related Blogs

CFOs Move to Chief Profitability Officer
CFOs Discuss Their Technology Priorities
The CFO Viewpoint upon Data
How CFOs can change the conversation with their CIO?
New type of CFO represents a potent CIO ally
Competing on Analytics
The Business Case for Better Data Connectivity

Twitter: @MylesSuer

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CFO Rising: CFO’s Show They Are Increasingly Business Oriented

The Rising CFO is Increasingly Business Oriented

CFO risingAt the CFO Rising West Conference on October 30th and 31st, there were sessions on managing capital expenditures, completing an IPO, and even managing margin and cash flow. However, the keynote presenters did not spend much of time on these topics. Instead, they focused on how CFOs need to help their firms execute better. Here is a quick summary of the suggestions made from CFOs in broadcasting, consumer goods, retail, healthcare, and medical devices.

The Modern CFO is Strategic

CFO risingThe Broadcasting CFO started his talk by saying he was not at the conference to share why CFOs need to move from being “bean counters to strategic advisors”. He said “let’s face it the modern CFO is a strategic CFO”. Agreeing with this viewpoint, the Consumer Goods CFO said that finance organizations have a major role to play in business transformation. He said that finance after all is the place to drive corporate improvement as well as business productivity and business efficiency.

CFOs Talked About Their Business’ Issues

CFO risingThe Retailer CFO talked like he was a marketing person. He said retail today is all about driving a multichannel customer experience. To do this, finance increasingly needs to provide real business value. He said, therefore, that data is critical to the retailer’s ability to serve customers better. He claimed that customers are changing how they buy, what they want to buy, and when they want to buy. We are being disrupted and it is better to understand and respond to these trends. We are trying, therefore, to build a better model of ecommerce.

Meanwhile, the Medical Devices CFO said that as a supplier to medical device vendors “what we do is compete with our customers engineering staffs”. And the Consumer Goods CFO added the importance of finance driving sustained business transformation.

CFOs Want To Improve Their Business’ Ability To Execute

CFO risingThe Medical Devices CFO said CFOs need to look for “earlier execution points”. They need to look for the drivers of behavior change. As a key element of this, he suggested that CFOs need to develop “early warning indicators”. He said CFOs need to actively look at the ability to achieve objectives. With sales, we need to ask what deals do we have in the pipe? At what size are these deals? And at what success rate will these deals be closed? Only with this information, can the CFO derive an expected company growth rate. He then asked CFOs in the room to identify themselves. With their hands in the air, he asked them are they helping to create a company that executes or not. He laid down the gauntlet for the CFOs in the room by then asserting that if you are not creating a company that executes then are going to be looking at cutting costs sooner rather than later.

The retailer CFO agreed with this CFO. He said today we need to focus on how to win a market. We need to be asking business questions including:

  • How should we deploy resources to deliver against our firm’s value proposition?
  • How do we know when we win?

CFOs Claim Ownership For Enterprise Performance Measurement

Data AnalysisThe Retail CFO said that finance needs to own “the facts for the organization”—the metrics and KPIs. This is how he claims CFOs will earn their seat at the CEOs table. He said in the past the CFO have tended to be stoic, but this now needs to change.

The Medical Devices CFO agreed and said enterprises shouldn’t be tracking 150 things—they need to pare it down to 12-15 things. They need to answer with what you measure—who, what, and when. He said in an execution culture people need to know the targets. They need measurable goals. And he asserted that business metrics are needed over financial metrics. The Consumer Goods CFO agreed by saying financial measures alone would find that “a house is on fire after half the house had already burned down”. The Healthcare CFO picked up on this idea and talked about the importance of finance driving value scorecards and monthly benchmarks of performance improvement. The broadcaster CFO went further and suggested the CFO’s role is one of a value optimizer.

CFOs Own The Data and Drive a Fact-based, Strategic Company Culture

FixThe Retail CFOs discussed the need to drive a culture of insight. This means that data absolutely matters to the CFO. Now, he honestly admits that finance organizations have not used data well enough but he claims finance needs to make the time to truly become data centric. He said I do not consider myself a data expert, but finance needs to own “enterprise data and the integrity of this data”. He said as well that finance needs to ensure there are no data silos. He summarized by saying finance needs to use data to make sure that resources are focused on the right things; decisions are based on facts; and metrics are simple and understandable. “In finance, we need use data to increasingly drive business outcomes”.

CFOs Need to Drive a Culture That Executes for Today and the Future

Honestly, I never thought that I would hear this from a group of CFOs. The Retail CFO said we need to ensure that the big ideas do not get lost. We need to speed-up the prosecuting of business activities. We need to drive more exponential things (this means we need to position our assets and resources) and we need, at the same time, to drive the linear things which can drive a 1% improvement in execution or a 1% reduction in cost. Meanwhile, our Medical Device CFO discussed the present value, for example, of a liability for rework, lawsuits, and warranty costs. He said that finance leaders need to ensure things are done right today so the business doesn’t have problems a year from today. “If you give doing it right the first time a priority, you can reduce warranty reserve and this can directly impact corporate operating income”.

CFOs need to lead on ethics and compliance

The Medical Devices CFO said that CFOs, also, need to have high ethics and drive compliance. The Retail CFO discussed how finance needs to make the business transparent. Finance needs to be transparent about what is working and what is not working. The role of the CFO, at the same time, needs to ensure the integrity of the organization. The Broadcaster CFO asserted the same thing by saying that CFOs need to take a stakeholder approach to how they do business.

Final remarks

In whole, CFOs at CFO Rising are showing the way forward for the modern CFOs. This CFO is all about the data to drive present and future performance, ethics and compliance, and business transparency. This is a big change from the historical controller approach and mentality. I once asked a boss about what I needed to be promoted to a Vice President; my boss said that I needed to move from a technical specialist to a business person. Today’s CFOs clearly show that they are a business person first.

Related links

Solution Brief: The Intelligent Data Platform

Related Blogs
CFOs Move to Chief Profitability Officer
CFOs Discuss Their Technology Priorities
The CFO Viewpoint upon Data
How CFOs can change the conversation with their CIO?
New type of CFO represents a potent CIO ally
Competing on Analytics
The Business Case for Better Data Connectivity
Twitter: @MylesSuer

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Gambling With Your Customer’s Financial Data

CIOs and CFOs both dig data security

Financial dataIn my discussions with CIOs over the last couple of months, I asked them about the importance of a series of topics. All of them placed data security at the top of their IT priority list. Even their CFO counterparts, with whom they do not always see eye to eye, said they were very concerned about the business risk for corporate data. These CFOs said that they touch, as a part of owning business risk, security — especially from hacking. One CFO said that he worried, as well, about the impact of data security for compliance issues, including HIPAA and SOX. Another said this: “The security of data is becoming more and more important. The auditors are going after this. CFOs, for this reason, are really worried about getting hacked. This is a whole new direction, but some of the highly publicized recent hacks have scared a lot of folks and they combined represent to many of us a watershed event.”

Editor of CFO Magazine

According to David W. Owens the editor of CFO Magazine, even if you are using “secure” storage, such as internal drives and private clouds, the access to these areas can be anything but secure. Practically any employee can be carrying around sensitive financial and performance data in his or her pocket, at any time.” Obviously, new forms of data access have created new forms of data risk.

Are some retailers really leaving the keys in the ignition?

If I only hadGiven the like mind set from CIOs and CFOs, I was shocked to learn that some of the recently hacked retailers had been using outdated security software, which may have given hackers easier access company payment data systems. Most amazingly, some retailers had not even encrypted their customer payment data. Because of this, hackers were able to hide on the network for months and steal payment data, as customers continued to use their credit cards at the company’s point of sale locations.

Why weren’t these transactions encrypted or masked? In my 1998 financial information start-up, we encrypted our databases to protect against hacks of our customers’ personal financial data. One answer came from a discussion with a Fortune 100 Insurance CIO. This CIO said “CIO’s/CTO’s/CISO’s struggle with selling the value of these investment because the C Suite is only interested in hearing about investments with a direct impact on business outcomes and benefits”.

Enterprise security drives enterprise brand today

Brand ValueSo how should leaders better argue the business case for security investments? I want to suggest that the value of IT is its “brand promise”. For retailers, in particular, if a past purchase decision creates a perceived personal data security risk, IT becomes a liability to their corporations brand equity and potentially creates a negative impact on future sales. Increasingly how these factors are managed either supports or not the value of a company’s brand.

My message is this: Spend whatever it takes to protect your brand equity; Otherwise a security issue will become a revenue issue.

In sum, this means organizations that want to differentiate themselves and avoid becoming a brand liability need to further invest in their data centric security strategy and of course, encryption. The game is no longer just about securing particular applications. IT organizations need to take a data centric approach to securing customer data and other types of enterprise data. Enterprise level data governance rules needs to be a requirement. A data centric approach can mitigate business risk by helping organizations to understand where sensitive data is and to protect it in motion and at rest. 

Related links

Solutions: Enterprise Level Data Security
The State of Data Centric Security
How Is The CIO Role Starting To Change?
The CFO viewpoint on data
CFOs discuss their technology priorities
Twitter: @MylesSuer

 

 

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CFO Move to Chief Profitability Officer

30% or higher of each company’s businesses are unprofitable

cfoAccording to Jonathan Brynes at the MIT Sloan School, “the most important issue facing most managers …is making more money from their existing businesses without costly new initiatives”. In Brynes’ cross industry research, he found that 30% or higher of each company’s businesses are unprofitable. Brynes claims these business losses are offset by what are “islands of high profitability”. The root cause of this issue is asserted to be the inability of current financial and management control systems to surface profitability problems and opportunities. Why is this the case? Byrnes believes that management budgetary guidance by its very nature assumes the continuation of the status quo. For this reason, the response to management asking for a revenue increase is to increase revenues for businesses that are profitable and unprofitable. Given this, “the areas of embedded unprofitability remain embedded and largely invisible”. At the same time to be completely fair, it should be recognized that it takes significant labor to accurately and completely put together a complete picture on direct and indirect costs.

The CFO needs to become the point person on profitability issues

cfo

Byrnes believes, nevertheless, that CFOs need to become the corporate point person for surfacing profitability issues. They, in fact, should act as the leader of a new and important role, the chief profitability officer. This may seem like an odd suggestion since virtually every CFO if asked would view profitability as a core element of their job. But Byrnes believes that CFOs need to move beyond broad, departmental performance measures and build profitability management processes into their companies’ core management activities. This task requires the CFO to determine two things.

  1. Which product lines, customers, segments, and channels are unprofitable so investments can be reduced or even eliminated?
  2. Which product lines, customers, segments, and channels are the most profitable so management can determine whether to expand investments and supporting operations?

Why didn’t portfolio management solve this problem?

cfoNow as a strategy MBA, Byrnes’ suggestion leave me wondering why the analysis proposed by strategy consultants like Boston Consulting Group didn’t solve this problem a long time ago. After all portfolio analysis has at its core the notion that relative market share and growth rate will determine profitability and which businesses a firm should build share, hold share, harvest share, or divest share—i.e. reduce, eliminate, or expand investment. The truth is getting at these figures, especially profitability, is a time consuming effort.

KPMG finds 91% of CFOs are held back by financial and performance systems

KPMG

As financial and business systems have become more complex, it has become harder and harder to holistically analyze customer and product profitability because the relevant data is spread over a myriad of systems, technologies, and locations. For this reason, 91% of CFO respondents in a recent KPMG survey said that they want to improve the quality of their financial and performance insight from the data they produce. An amazing 51% of these CFOs, also, admitted that the “collection, storage, and retrieval financial and performance data at their company is primarily a manual and/or spreadsheet-based exercise”. Think about it — a majority of these CFOs teams time is spent collecting financial data rather than actively managing corporate profitability.

How do we fix things?

FixWhat is needed is a solution that allows financial teams to proactively produce trustworthy financial data from each and every financial system and then reliably combine and aggregate the data coming from multiple financial systems. Having accomplished this, the solution needs to allow financial organizations to slice and dice net profitability for product lines and customers.

This approach would not only allow financial organizations to cut their financial operational costs but more importantly drive better business profitability by surfacing profitability gaps. At the same time, it would enable financial organizations to assist business units in making more informed customer and product line investment decisions. If a product line or business is narrowly profitable and lacks a broader strategic context or ability to increase profitability by growing market share, it is a candidate for investment reduction or elimination.

Strategic CFOs need to start asking questions of their business counterparts starting with their justification for their investment strategy. Key to doing this involves consolidating reliable profitability data across customers, products, channel partners, suppliers. This would eliminate the time spent searching for and manually reconciling data in different formats across multiple systems. It should deliver ready analysis across locations, applications, channels, and departments.

Some parting thoughts

Strategic CFOs tell us they are trying to seize the opportunity “to be a business person versus a bean counting historically oriented CPA”. I believe a key element of this is seizing the opportunity to become the firm’s chief profitability officer. To do this well, CFOs need dependable data that can be sliced and diced by business dimensions. Armed with this information, CFOs can determine the most and least profitability, businesses, product lines, and customers. As well, they can come to the business table with the perspective to help guide their company’s success.

Related links
Solution Brief: The Intelligent Data Platform
Related Blogs
CFOs Discuss Their Technology Priorities
The CFO Viewpoint upon Data
How CFOs can change the conversation with their CIO?
New type of CFO represents a potent CIO ally
Competing on Analytics
The Business Case for Better Data Connectivity

Twitter: @MylesSuer

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Posted in Business Impact / Benefits, Business/IT Collaboration, CIO, Data Governance, Data Quality | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

CFOs Discuss Their Technology Priorities

Recently, I had the opportunity to talk to a number of CFOs about their technology priorities. These discussions represent an opportunity for CIOs to hear what their most critical stakeholder considers important. The CFOs did not hesitate or need to think much about this question. They said three things make their priority list. They are better financial system reliability, better application integration, and better data security and governance. The top two match well with a recent KPMG study which found the biggest improvement finance executives want to see—cited by 91% of survey respondents—is in the quality of financial and performance insight obtained from the data they produce, followed closely by the finance and accounting organization’s ability to proactively analyze that information before it is stale or out of date”

TrustBetter financial system reliability

CFOs want to know that their systems work and are reliable. They want the data collected from their systems to be analyzed in a timely fashion. Importantly, CFOs say they are worried not only about the timeliness of accounting and financial data. This is because they increasingly need to manage upward with information.  For this reason, they want timely, accurate information produced for financial and business decision makers. Their goal is to drive out better enterprise decision making.

In manufacturing, for example, CFOs say they want data to span from the manufacturing systems to the distribution system. They want to be able to push a button and get a report. These CFOs complain today about the need to manually massage and integrate data from system after system before they get what they and their business decision makers want and need.

IntegrationBetter Application Integration

CFOs really feel the pain of systems not talking to each other. CFOs know firsthand that they have “disparate systems” and that too much manual integration is going on. For them, they see firsthand the difficulties in connecting data from the frontend to backend systems. They personally feel the large number of manual steps required to pull data. They want their consolidation of account information to be less manual and to be more timely. One CFO said that “he wants the integration of the right systems to provide the right information to be done so they have the right information to manage and make decisions at the right time”.

Data Security and Governance

securityCFOs, at the same time, say they have become more worried about data security and governance. Even though CFOs believe that security is the job of the CIO and their CISO, they have an important role to play in data governance. CFOs say they are really worried about getting hacked. One CFO told me that he needs to know that systems are always working properly. Security of data matters today to CFOs for two reasons. First, data has a clear material impact. Just take a look at the out of pocket and revenue losses coming from the breach at Target. Second, CFOs, which were already being audited for technology and system compliance, feel that their audit firms will be obligated to extend what they were doing in security and governance and go as a part of regular compliance audits. One CFO put it this way. “This is a whole new direction for us. Target scared a lot of folks and will be to many respects a watershed event for CFOs”.

Take aways

So the message here is that CFOs prioritize three technology objectives for their CIOs– better IT reliability, better application integration, and improved data security and governance. Each of these represents an opportunity to make the CFOs life easier but more important to enable them to take on a more strategic role. The CFOs, that we talked to, want to become one of the top three decision makers in the enterprise. Fixing these things for CFOs will enable CIOs to build a closer CFO and business relationships.

Related links

Solution Brief: The Intelligent Data Platform

Solution Brief: Secure at Source

Related Blogs

The CFO Viewpoint upon Data

How CFOs can change the conversation with their CIO?

New type of CFO represents a potent CIO ally

Competing on Analytics

The Business Case for Better Data Connectivity

Twitter: @MylesSuer

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Posted in CIO, Data Security, Governance, Risk and Compliance | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

The CFO Viewpoint upon Data

According to the Financial Executives Institute, CFOs say their second highest priority this year is to harness business intelligence and big data. Their highest priority is to improve cash flow and working capital efficiency and effectiveness. This means CFOs highest two priorities are centered around data. At roughly the same time, KPMG has found in their survey of CFOs that 91% want to improve the quality of their financial and performance insight obtained from the data that they produce. Even more amazing 51% of CFO admitted that “collecting, storing, and retrieving financial and performance data at their company is primarily accomplished through a manual and/or spreadsheet-based exercise”. From our interviews of CFOs, we believe this number is much higher.

automationDigitization increasing but automation is limited for the finance department

Your question at this point—if you are not a CFO—should be how can this be the case? After all strategy consultants like Booz and Company, actively measure the degree of digitization and automation taking place in businesses by industry and these numbers year after year have shown a strong upward bias. How can the finance organization be digitized for data collection but still largely manual in its processes for putting together the figures that management and the market needs?
 
 
TrustCFOs do not trust their data

In our interviews of CFOs, one CFO answered this question bluntly by saying “If the systems suck, then you cannot trust the numbers when you get them.” And this reality truly limits CFOs in how they respond to their top priorities. Things like management of the P&L, Expense Management, Compliance, and Regulatory all are impacted by the CFOs data problem. Instead of doing a better job at these issues, CFOs and their teams remain largely focused on “getting the numbers right”. And even worse, the answering of business questions like how much revenue is this customer providing or how profitable this customer is, involves manual pulls of data today from more than one system. And yes, similar data issues exist in financial services organizations which close the books nightly.

ProblemCFOs share openly their data problem

The CFOs, that I have talked to, admit without hesitation that data is a big issue for them. These CFOs say that they worry about data from the source and the ability to do meaningful financial or managerial analysis. They say they need to rely on data in order to report but as important they need it to help drive synergies across businesses. This matters because CFOs say they want to move from being just “bean counters” to being participants in the strategy of their enterprises.

To succeed, CFOs say that they need timely, accurate data. However, they are the first to discuss how disparate systems get in their way. CFOs believe that making their lives easier starts with the systems that support them. What they believe is needed is real integration and consolidation of data. One CFO said what is needed this way, “we need the integration of the right systems to provide the right information so we can manage and make decisions at the right time”. CFOs clearly want to know that the accounting systems are working and reliable. At the same time, CFOs want, for example, a holistic view of customer. When asked why this isn’t a marketing activity, they say this is business issue that CFOs need to help manage. “We want to understand the customer across business units.  It is a finance objective because finance is responsible for business metrics and there are gaps in business metrics around customer. How much cross sell opportunities is the business as a whole pursuing?”

Chief Profitability Officers?                                               

Jonathan Brynes at the MIT Sloan School confirms this viewpoint is becoming a larger trend when he suggests that CFOs need to take on the function of “Chief Profitability Officers”. With this hat, CFOs, in his view, need to determine which product lines, customers, segments, and channels are the most and the least profitable. Once again, this requires that CFOs tackle their data problem to have relevant, holistic information.

CIOs remain responsible for data delivery

Data DeliveryCFOs believe that CIOs remain responsible for how data is delivered. CFOs, say that they need to lead in creating validated data and reports. Clearly, if data delivery remains a manual process, then the CFO will be severely limited in their ability to adequately support their new and strategic charter. Yet CFOs when asked if they see data as a competitive advantage say that “every CFO would view data done well as a competitive advantage”. Some CFOs even suggest that data is the last competitive advantage. This fits really well with the view of Davenport in “Competing on Analytics”. The question is how soon will CIOs and CFOs work together to get the finance organization out of its mess of manually massaging and consolidating financial and business data.

Related links

Solution Brief: The Intelligent Data Platform

Related Blogs

How CFOs can change the conversation with their CIO?

New type of CFO represents a potent CIO ally

Competing on Analytics

The Business Case for Better Data Connectivity

Is Big Data Destined To Become Small And Vertical?

What is big data and why should your business care?

Twitter: @MylesSuer

 

 

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Posted in Business/IT Collaboration, Enterprise Data Management, Governance, Risk and Compliance | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

How CFOs can change the conversation with their CIO?

Recently, I had the opportunity to interview half dozen CIOs and half dozen CFOs. Kind of like a marriage therapist, I got to see each party’s story about the relationship. CFOs, in particular, felt that the quality of the relationship could impact their businesses’ success. Armed with this knowledge, I wanted to see if I could help each leader build a better working relationship. Previously, I let CIO’s know about the emergence and significance of the strategic CFO.  In today’s post, l will start by sharing the CIOs perspective on the CFO relationship and then I will discuss how CFOs can build better CIO relationships.

CIOs feel under the gun these days!

Under the gunIf you don’t know, CIOs feel under the gun these days. CIOs see their enterprises demanding ubiquitous computing. Users want to use their apps and expect corporate apps to look like their personal apps such as Facebook. They want to bring their own preferred devices. Most of all, , they want all their data on any device when they need it. This means CIOs are trying to manage a changing technical landscape of mobile, cloud, social, and big data. These are all vying for both dollars and attention. As a result, CIOs see their role in a sea change. Today, they need to focus less on building things and more on managing vendors. CIOs say that they need to 1) better connect what IT is doing to support the business strategy;  2) improve technical orchestration; and 3) improve process excellence. This is a big and growing charter.

CIOs see the CFO conversation being just about the numbers

Only about the numbersCIOs worry that you don’t understand how many things are now being run by IT and that historical percentages of revenue may no longer appropriate. Think about healthcare, which used to be a complete laggard in technology but today it is having everything digitalized. Even a digital thermometer plugs into an iPad so it directly communicates with a patient record. The world has clearly changed. And CIOs worry that you view IT as merely a cost center and that you do not see the value generated through IT investment or the asset that information provides to business decision makers. However, the good news is that I believe that a different type of discussion is possible. And that CFOs have the opportunity to play an important role in helping to shape the value that CIOs deliver to the business.

CFOs should share their experience and business knowledge

Business ExperienceCFOs that I talked to said that they believe the CFO/CIO relationship needs to be complimentary and that the roles have the most concentric rings. These CFOs believe that the stronger the relationship the better it is for their business. One area that you can help the CIO is in sharing your knowledge of the business and business needs. CIOs are trying to get closer to the business and you can help build this linkage and to support requests that come out of this process. Clearly, an aligned CFO can be “one of the biggest advocates of the CIO”. Given this, make sure that you are on your CIOs Investment Committee.

 Tell your CIO about your data pains

Manual data movementCFOs need to be good customers too. CFOs that I talked to told me that they know their business has “a data issue”. They worry about the integrity of data from the source. CFOs see their role as relying increasingly on timely, accurate data. They, also, know they have disparate systems and too much manual stuff going on in the back office. For them, integration needs to exist from the frontend to the backend. Their teams personally feel the large number of manual steps.

For this reasons, CFOs, we talked to, believe that the integration of data is a big issue whether they are in a small or large business. Have you talked to your CIO about data integration or quality projects to change the ugliness that you have to live with day in day out? It will make you and the business more efficient. One CFO was blunt here saying “making life easier is all about the systems. If the systems suck then you cannot trust the numbers when you get them. You want to access the numbers easily, timely, and accurately. You want to make easier to forecast so you can set expectations with the business and externally”.

At the same time, CFOs that I talked to worried about the quality of financial and business data analysis. Once he had data, he worried about being able to analyze information effectively. Increasingly, CFOs say that they need to help drive synergies across their businesses. At the same time, CFOs increasingly need to manage upward with information.  They want information for decision makers so they can make better decisions.

Changing the CIO Dialog

So it is clear that CFOs like you see data as a competitive advantage in particular financial data. The question is, as your unofficial therapist, why aren’t you having a discussion with your CIO not just about the numbers or financial justification for this or that system and instead, asking about the+ integration investment that can make your integration problems go away.

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New type of CFO represents a potent CIO ally

The strategic CFO is different than the “1975 Controller CFO”

CFOTraditionally, CIOs have tended to work with what one CIO called a “1975 Controller CFO”. For this reason, the relationship between CIOs and CFOs was expressed well in a single word “contentious”. But a new type of CFO is emerging that offers the potential of different type of relationship. These so called “strategic CFOs” can be an effective ally for CIOs. The question is which type of CFO do you have? In this post, I will provide you with a bit of a litmus test so you can determine what type of CFO you have but more importantly, I will share how you can take maximum advantage of having a strategic-oriented CFO relationship. But first let’s hear a bit more of the CIOs reactions to CFOs.

Views of CIOs according to CIO interviews

downloadClearly, “the relationship…with these CFOs is filled with friction”. Controller CFOs “do not get why so many things require IT these days. They think that things must be out of whack. One CIO said that they think technology should only cost 2-3% of revenue while it can easily reach 8-9% of revenue these days.” Another CIO complained by saying their discussion with a Controller CFOs is only about IT productivity and effectiveness. In their eyes, this has limited the topics of discussion to IT cost reduction, IT produced business savings, and the soundness of the current IT organization. Unfortunately, this CIO believe that Controller CFOs are not concerned with creating business value or sees information as an asset. Instead, they view IT as a cost center. Another CIO says Controller CFOs are just about the numbers and see the CIO role as being about signing checks. It is a classic “demand versus supply” issue. At the same times, CIOs say that they see reporting to Controller CFO as a narrowing function. As well, they believe it signals to the rest of the organization “that IT is not strategic and less important than other business functions”.

What then is this strategic CFO?

bean counterIn contrast to their controller peers, strategic CFOs often have a broader business background than their accounting and a CPA peers. Many have, also, pursued an MBA. Some have public accounting experience. Others yet come from professions like legal, business development, or investment banking.

More important than where they came from, strategic CFOs see a world that is about more than just numbers. They want to be more externally facing and to understand their company’s businesses. They tend to focus as much on what is going to happen as they do on what has happened. Remember, financial accounting is backward facing. Given this, strategic CFOs spend a lot of time trying to understand what is going on in their firm’s businesses. One strategic CFO said that they do this so they can contribute and add value—I want to be a true business leader. And taking this posture often puts them in the top three decision makers for their business. There may be lessons in this posture for technology focused CIOs.

Why is a strategic CFO such a game changer for CIO?

Business DecisionsOne CIO put it this way. “If you have a modern day CFO, then they are an enabler of IT”. Strategic CFO’s agree. Strategic CFOs themselves as having the “the most concentric circles with the CIO”. They believe that they need “CIOs more than ever to extract data to do their jobs better and to provide the management information business leadership needs to make better business decisions”. At the same time, the perspective of a strategic CFO can be valuable to the CIO because they have good working knowledge of what the business wants. They, also, tend to be close to the management information systems and computer systems. CFOs typically understand the needs of the business better than most staff functions. The CFOs, therefore, can be the biggest advocate of the CIO. This is why strategic CFOs should be on the CIOs Investment Committee. Finally, a strategic CFO can help a CIO ensure their technology selections meet affordability targets and are compliant with the corporate strategy.

Are the priorities of a strategic CFO different?

Strategic CFOs still care P&L, Expense Management, Budgetary Control, Compliance, and Risk Management. But they are also concerned about performance management for the enterprise as whole and senior management reporting. As well they, they want to do the above tasks faster so finance and other functions can do in period management by exception. For this reason they see data and data analysis as a big issue.

Strategic CFOs care about data integration

In interviews of strategic CFOs, I saw a group of people that truly understand the data holes in the current IT system. And they intuit firsthand the value proposition of investing to fix things here. These CFOs say that they worry “about the integrity of data from the source and about being able to analyze information”. They say that they want the integration to be good enough that at the push of button they can get an accurate report. Otherwise, they have to “massage the data and then send it through another system to get what you need”.

These CFOs say that they really feel the pain of systems not talking to each other. They understand this means making disparate systems from the frontend to the backend talk to one another. But they, also, believe that making things less manual will drive important consequences including their own ability to inspect books more frequently. Given this, they see data as a competitive advantage. One CFO even said that they thought data is the last competitive advantage.

Strategic CFOs are also worried about data security. They believe their auditors are going after this with a vengeance. They are really worried about getting hacked. One said, “Target scared a lot of folks and was to many respects a watershed event”. At the same time, Strategic CFOs want to be able to drive synergies across the business. One CFO even extolled the value of a holistic view of customer. When I asked why this was a finance objective versus a marketing objective, they said finance is responsible for business metrics and we have gaps in our business metrics around customer including the percentage of cross sell is taking place between our business units. Another CFO amplified on this theme by saying that “increasingly we need to manage upward with information. For this reason, we need information for decision makers so they can make better decisions”. Another strategic CFO summed this up by saying “the integration of the right systems to provide the right information needs to be done so we and the business have the right information to manage and make decisions at the right time”.

So what are you waiting for?

If you are lucky enough to have a Strategic CFO, start building your relationship. And you can start by discussing their data integration and data quality problems. So I have a question for you. How many of you think you have a Controller CFO versus a Strategic CFO? Please share here.

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Posted in Data Governance, Informatica Feature | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment