Tag Archives: bad data

A Data-Driven Healthcare Culture is Foundational to Delivering Personalized Medicine in Healthcare

According to a recent article in the LA Times, healthcare costs in the United States far exceed costs in other countries. For example, heart bypass surgery costs an average of $75,345 in the U.S. compared to $15,742 in the Netherlands and $16,492 in Argentina. In the U.S. healthcare accounts for 18% of the U.S. GDP and is increasing. 

Michelle Blackmer is an healthcare industry expert at Informatica

Michelle Blackmer is an healthcare industry expert at Informatica

Michelle Blackmer is an healthcare industry expert at Informatica. In this interview, she explains why business as usual isn’t good enough anymore. Healthcare organizations are rethinking how they do business in an effort to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and comply with regulatory pressures such as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Michelle believes a data-driven healthcare culture is foundational to personalized medicine and discusses the importance of clean, safe and connected data in executing a successful transformation.

Q. How is the healthcare industry responding to the rising costs of healthcare?
In response to the rising costs of healthcare, regulatory pressures (i.e. Affordable Care Act (ACA)), and the need to better patient outcomes at lower costs, the U.S. healthcare industry is transforming from a volume-based to a value-based model. In this new model, healthcare organizations need to invest in delivering personalized medicine.

To appreciate the potential of personalized medicine, think about your own healthcare experience. It’s typically reactive. You get sick, you go to the doctor, the doctor issues a prescription and you wait a couple of days to see if that drug works. If it doesn’t, you call the doctor and she tries another drug. This process is tedious, painful and costly.

Now imagine if you had a chronic disease like depression or cancer. On average, any given prescription drug only works for half of those who take it. Among cancer patients, the rate of ineffectiveness jumps to 75 percent. Anti-depressants are effective in only 62 percent of those who take them.

Video: MD Anderson Cancer CenterOrganizations like MD Anderson and UPMC aim to put an end to cancer. They are combining scientific research with access to clean, safe and connected data (data of all types including genomic data). The insights revealed will empower personalized chemotherapies. Personalized medicine offers customized treatments based on patient history and best practices. Personalized medicine will transform healthcare delivery. Click on the links to watch videos about their transformational work.

Q. What role does data play in enabling personalized medicine?
Data is foundational to value-based care and personalized medicine. Not just any data will do. It needs to be clean, safe and connected data. It needs to be delivered rapidly across hallways and across networks.

As an industry, healthcare is at a stage where meaningful electronic data is being generated. Now you need to ensure that the data is accessible and trustworthy so that it can be rapidly analyzed. As data is aggregated across the ecosystem, married with financial and genomic data, data quality issues become more obvious. It’s vital that you can define the data issues so the people can spend their time analyzing the data to gain insights instead of wading through and manually resolving data quality issues.

The ability to trust data will differentiate leaders from the followers. Leaders will advance personalized medicine because they rely on clean, safe and connected data to:

1)      Practice analytics as a core competency
2)      Define evidence, deliver best practice care and personalize medicine
3)      Engage patients and collaborate to foster strong, actionable relationships

Healthcare e-bookTake a look at this Healthcare eBook for more on this topic: Potential Unlocked: Transforming Healthcare by Putting Information to Work.

Q. What is holding healthcare organizations back from managing their healthcare data like other mission-critical assets?
When you say other mission-critical assets, I think of facilitates, equipment, etc. Each of these assets has people and money assigned to manage and maintain them. The healthcare organizations I talk to who are highly invested in personalized medicine recognize that data is mission-critical. They are investing in the people, processes and technology needed to ensure data is clean, safe and connected. The technology includes data integration, data quality and master data management (MDM).

What’s holding other healthcare organizations back is that while they realize they need data governance, they wrongly believe they need to hire big teams of “data stewards” to be successful. In reality, you don’t need to hire a big team. Use the people you already have doing data governance. You may not have made this a formal part of their job description and they might not have data governance technologies yet, but they do have the skillset and they are already doing the work of a data steward.

So while a technology investment is required and you need people who can use the technology, start by formalizing the data stewardship work people are doing already as part of their current job. This way you have people who understand the data, taking an active role in the management of the data and they even get excited about it because their work is being recognized. IT takes on the role of enabling these people instead of having responsibility for all things data.

Q. Can you share examples of how immature information governance is a serious impediment to healthcare payers and providers?
Cost of Bad DataSure, without information governance, data is not harmonized across sources and so it is hard to make sense of it. This isn’t a problem when you are one business unit or one department, but when you want to get a comprehensive view or a view that incorporates external sources of information, this approach falls apart.

For example, let’s say the cardiology department in a healthcare organization implements a dashboard. The dashboard looks impressive. Then a group of physicians sees the dashboard, point out erroes and ask where the information (i.e. diagnosis or attending physician) came from. If you can’t answer these questions, trace the data back to its sources, or if you have data inconsistencies, the dashboard loses credibility. This is an example of how analytics fail to gain adoption and fail to foster innovation.

Q. Can you share examples of what data-driven healthcare organizations are doing differently?
Certainly, while many are just getting started on their journey to becoming data-driven, I’m seeing some inspiring  examples, including:

  • Implementing data governance for healthcare analytics. The program and data is owned by the business and enabled by IT and supported by technology such as data integration, data quality and MDM.
  • Connecting information from across the entire healthcare ecosystem including 3rd party sources like payers, state agencies, and reference data like credit information from Equifax, firmographics from Dun & Bradstreet or NPI numbers from the national provider registry.
  • Establishing consistent data definitions and parameters
  • Thinking about the internet of things (IoT) and how to incorporate device data into analysis
  • Engaging patients through non-traditional channels including loyalty programs and social media; tracking this information in a customer relationship management (CRM) system
  • Fostering collaboration by understanding the relationships between patients, providers and the rest of the ecosystem
  • Analyzing data to understand what is working and what is not working so  that they can drive out unwanted variations in care

Q. What advice can you give healthcare provider and payer employees who want access to high quality healthcare data?
As with other organizational assets that deliver value—like buildings and equipment—data requires a foundational investment in people and systems to maximize return. In other words, institutions and individuals must start managing their mission-critical data with the same rigor they manage other mission-critical enterprise assets.

Q. Anything else you want to add?
Yes, I wanted to thank our 14 visionary customer executives at data-driven healthcare organizations such as MD Anderson, UPMC, Quest Diagnostics, Sutter Health, St. Joseph Health, Dallas Children’s Medical Center and Navinet for taking time out of their busy schedules to share their journeys toward becoming data-driven at Informatica World 2014.  In our next post, I’ll share some highlights about how they are using data, how they are ensuring it is clean, safe and connected and a few data management best practices. InformaticaWorld attendees will be able to download presentations starting today! If you missed InformaticaWorld 2014, stay tuned for our upcoming webinars featuring many of these examples.

 

 

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Posted in Business Impact / Benefits, Business/IT Collaboration, Customers, Data Governance, Data Integration, Data Quality, Enterprise Data Management, Healthcare, Informatica World 2014, Master Data Management, Vertical | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Murphy’s First Law of Bad Data – If You Make A Small Change Without Involving Your Client – You Will Waste Heaps Of Money

I have not used my personal encounter with bad data management for over a year but a couple of weeks ago I was compelled to revive it.  Why you ask? Well, a complete stranger started to receive one of my friend’s text messages – including mine – and it took days for him to detect it and a week later nobody at this North American wireless operator had been able to fix it.  This coincided with a meeting I had with a European telco’s enterprise architecture team.  There was no better way to illustrate to them how a customer reacts and the risk to their operations, when communication breaks down due to just one tiny thing changing – say, his address (or in the SMS case, some random SIM mapping – another type of address).

Imagine the cost of other bad data (thecodeproject.com)

Imagine the cost of other bad data (thecodeproject.com)

In my case, I  moved about 250 miles within the United States a couple of years ago and this seemingly common experience triggered a plethora of communication screw ups across every merchant a residential household engages with frequently, e.g. your bank, your insurer, your wireless carrier, your average retail clothing store, etc.

For more than two full years after my move to a new state, the following things continued to pop up on a monthly basis due to my incorrect customer data:

  • In case of my old satellite TV provider they got to me (correct person) but with a misspelled last name at my correct, new address.
  • My bank put me in a bit of a pickle as they sent “important tax documentation”, which I did not want to open as my new tenants’ names (in the house I just vacated) was on the letter but with my new home’s address.
  • My mortgage lender sends me a refinancing offer to my new address (right person & right address) but with my wife’s as well as my name completely butchered.
  • My wife’s airline, where she enjoys the highest level of frequent flyer status, continually mails her offers duplicating her last name as her first name.
  • A high-end furniture retailer sends two 100-page glossy catalogs probably costing $80 each to our address – one for me, one for her.
  • A national health insurer sends “sensitive health information” (disclosed on envelope) to my new residence’s address but for the prior owner.
  • My legacy operator turns on the wrong premium channels on half my set-top boxes.
  • The same operator sends me a SMS the next day thanking me for switching to electronic billing as part of my move, which I did not sign up for, followed by payment notices (as I did not get my invoice in the mail).  When I called this error out for the next three months by calling their contact center and indicating how much revenue I generate for them across all services, they counter with “sorry, we don’t have access to the wireless account data”, “you will see it change on the next bill cycle” and “you show as paper billing in our system today”.

Ignoring the potential for data privacy law suits, you start wondering how long you have to be a customer and how much money you need to spend with a merchant (and they need to waste) for them to take changes to your data more seriously.  And this are not even merchants to whom I am brand new – these guys have known me and taken my money for years!

One thing I nearly forgot…these mailings all happened at least once a month on average, sometimes twice over 2 years.  If I do some pigeon math here, I would have estimated the postage and production cost alone to run in the hundreds of dollars.

However, the most egregious trespass though belonged to my home owner’s insurance carrier (HOI), who was also my mortgage broker.  They had a double whammy in store for me.  First, I received a cancellation notice from the HOI for my old residence indicating they had cancelled my policy as the last payment was not received and that any claims will be denied as a consequence.  Then, my new residence’s HOI advised they added my old home’s HOI to my account.

After wondering what I could have possibly done to trigger this, I called all four parties (not three as the mortgage firm did not share data with the insurance broker side – surprise, surprise) to find out what had happened.

It turns out that I had to explain and prove to all of them how one party’s data change during my move erroneously exposed me to liability.  It felt like the old days, when seedy telco sales people needed only your name and phone number and associate it with some sort of promotion (back of a raffle card to win a new car), you never took part in, to switch your long distance carrier and present you with a $400 bill the coming month.  Yes, that also happened to me…many years ago.  Here again, the consumer had to do all the legwork when someone (not an automatic process!) switched some entry without any oversight or review triggering hours of wasted effort on their and my side.

We can argue all day long if these screw ups are due to bad processes or bad data, but in all reality, even processes are triggered from some sort of underlying event, which is something as mundane as a database field’s flag being updated when your last purchase puts you in a new marketing segment.

Now imagine you get married and you wife changes her name. With all these company internal (CRM, Billing, ERP),  free public (property tax), commercial (credit bureaus, mailing lists) and social media data sources out there, you would think such everyday changes could get picked up quicker and automatically.  If not automatically, then should there not be some sort of trigger to kick off a “governance” process; something along the lines of “email/call the customer if attribute X has changed” or “please log into your account and update your information – we heard you moved”.  If American Express was able to detect ten years ago that someone purchased $500 worth of product with your credit card at a gas station or some lingerie website, known for fraudulent activity, why not your bank or insurer, who know even more about you? And yes, that happened to me as well.

Tell me about one of your “data-driven” horror scenarios?

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Posted in Banking & Capital Markets, Business Impact / Benefits, Business/IT Collaboration, Complex Event Processing, Customer Acquisition & Retention, Customer Services, Customers, Data Aggregation, Data Governance, Data Privacy, Data Quality, Enterprise Data Management, Financial Services, Governance, Risk and Compliance, Healthcare, Master Data Management, Retail, Telecommunications, Uncategorized, Vertical | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Queensland Police Service Case Study: Use Your Bad Data To Build A Compelling Data Quality Business Case

Some might think that building a data quality business case is difficult and complicated – but it doesn’t have to be.

Graeme Campbell, former manager of the client services group at Queensland Police Service (QPS) in Australia

At InformaticaWorld, I had the pleasure of meeting Graeme Campbell, ex manager of the client services group at Queensland Police Service (QPS) in Australia, where he delivered a compelling presentation titled, Queensland Police Drive Out Crime with Informatica. My key takeaway: build a simple, business-focused and results-oriented business case that inspires action. (more…)

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Posted in Business Impact / Benefits, Data Quality, Master Data Management, Public Sector | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

MDM – What’s The Cost Of Bad Data In Financial Services?

One of the most critical first steps for financial services firms looking to implement multidomain master data management (MDM) is to quantify the cost savings they could achieve.

Unfortunately, a thorough analysis of potential ROI is also one of the steps least followed (a key culprit being disconnects between business and IT).

This shortcoming is spotlighted in a new Informatica white paper, “Five Steps to Managing Reference Data More Effectively in Investment Banking,” which outlines key questions to ask in sizing up the cost implications of bad data and antiquated systems, such as:

  • How long does it take to introduce a new security to trade?
  • How many settlements need to be fixed manually?
  • How many redundant data feeds does your firm have to manage?
  • How accurate and complete are your end-of-day reports?
  • Do you have the data you need to minimize risk and exposure? (more…)
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Posted in Enterprise Data Management, Financial Services, Governance, Risk and Compliance, Master Data Management, Operational Efficiency | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment