Category Archives: Retail

Data Driven Retail: The Path to Maximize Shopper Experience

Retail

Data Driven Retail: The Path to Maximize Shopper Experience

On our recent webinar with Omer Minkara from Aberdeen Group , we learnt that“94% of companies are not satisfied with their use of customer data”, yet retailers still want more data to gain valuable customer insights to drive improvements in the shopper experience. But the top challenge they face when managing customer data as part of their business activities is the quality of the data.  Data-Driven retailers are characterized by their ability to balance quantity and quality of data effectively.

Shoppers expect consistency in their interactions with you, whether it’s the same price across channels, accurate shipping information or when they are calling a contact center. However, one of the top frustrations for consumers is the need to provide the same information over and over as they interact with the retailer. This data is already captured in multiple systems but is not connected or clean. Fragmented views of customer data across multiple systems makes it harder to personalize shopper interaction and enhance the overall customer experience.

Bring your data management to today’s omni-channel world

By standardizing customer data across the organization and having a centralized repository of product and service information available to all customer facing roles, data- driven retailers have enjoyed increased margins, higher returns on marketing investments, shorter delivery times and improved time to market for products and services.

Data-driven retailers are not just meeting customer expectations, they are exceeding them.

In my next blog I will look at some of the questions we did not get to answer during this session. In the meantime, why not register for our next webinar “Calculating Omni-Channel Customer Experience – March 19 Webinar” with Arkady Kleyner, Solution Architect, Intricity.

Don’t to follow us on twitter @INFARetail.

Share
Posted in CMO, Customer Acquisition & Retention, Customer Services, Customers, Retail | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Four Ways Retailers Turn Away Customers

retailers

Four Ways Retailers Turn Away Customers

If you take a company that is already delivering a great customer experience and add time to the equation, what do you get?

For the answer, take a look at this observation from Shoebuy’s SVP of Customer Experience and Retention, Kavita Baball (published in this new article):

“Customer expectations change over time, so even though you may deliver a good experience now, you have to always consider the customer and their changing needs and expectations.”

In all areas of their business, Shoebuy’s MVP is their customers. One more interesting thing about Shoebuy: They offer over 1 million products on their website.

A study reported in Multichannel Merchant magazine analyzed numerous products sold online by retailers. It found that when a new product is added to an ecommerce website, it directly contributes to growth in gross merchandise value. Today, more products (and more unique selections for the customer to choose from) create more revenue overall.

The rules of inventory, selection, price, and placement are bent and broken by changing customer preferences and innovations from the rise of online retailing. It wasn’t so long ago that retailers started creating niche options in their stores and online to appeal to changing consumer preferences. In retail, the unique, personalized, special option is highly valued by consumers today.

Limitless options are available online, so a consumer can find nearly anything he or she wants from a variety of sources. What can retailers do when customers want something unique, just for them, and can get it anywhere?

The only answer is adding value by providing a great customer experience. An amazing thing to note here: Gartner predicts that by 2016, companies in all industries will be competing on customer experience alone.

Until then, retailers should assess how they lose customers over time because of a poor experience. As Shoebuy knows, customer preferences continue to change. What works now may not always be a solid strategy. Fewer than 50% of companies in a Gartner survey said their customer service was exceptional today. If you aren’t putting customers at the center of everything, throughout your business, Gartner’s prediction shows that you are essentially turning away customers. Here are four ways this can happen:

1. Not being able to contact customers. If your contact data is invalid, including email addresses, phone numbers, and postal addresses, it can be really tough to call yourself customer-centric. Bounced emails, returned packages, and wrong numbers hurt the customer experience. When e-receipts aren’t received, or a customer service call isn’t successfully made, or an order is sent to the wrong address, customers are unlikely to be loyal and come back for what they believe will be the same experience.

2. Not providing a single experience across channels. When customers contact you for service or support in your call center, the representative should be able to pull up a full contact record, including past buying histories and other contextual information that helps make the interaction a success. The same applies to your ecommerce site, in-store at point-of-sale, and any other channel. According to Forrester Research, 42% of customer service representatives said they were not able to resolve customer issues effectively due to disconnected systems across multiple applications with outdated interfaces.

3. Offer no additional value. Part of a great customer experience is adding stand-out services, conveniences, and speed to every interaction. Customization options, online support and knowledge centers, and membership for exclusive perks are just a few ways to help your customers while building your authority in the market. Loyalty memberships are a great way in particular for marketers to use, as they provide great perks to customers while giving retailers insight into who their customers are. Add-ons may be perceived as expensive to provide, but 86% of buyers said that they would pay more for a better customer experience, according to survey results from Harris Interactive.

4. Not increasing investments in your marketing technology. More and more, improving every customer interaction throughout all channels is becoming part of the job description for marketers. According to eMarketer, the top reason marketers said they needed new technology investments was to improve customer service and satisfaction. See more on steps you can take to avoid wasting your marketing budget in 2015 in this blog post.

—-

Being faster, more reliable, innovative, and being there for your customers are all going to be important for retailers in 2015. For more on this topic for retailers, check out this new infographic, “4 Ways Retailers Can Improve Customer Centricity” on the Retail TouchPoints website.

Share
Posted in Customers, DaaS, Retail | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Asia-Pacific Ecommerce surpassed Europe and North America

With a total B2C e-commerce turnover of $567.3bn in 2013, Asia-Pacific was the strongest e-commerce region in the world in 2013, as it surpassed Europe ($482.3bn) and North America ($452.4bn). Online sales in Asia-Pacific expected to have reached $799.2 billion in 2014, due to latest report from the Ecommerce Foundation.

Revenue: China, followed by Japan and Australia
As a matter of fact, China was the second-largest e-commerce market in the world, only behind the US ($419.0 billion), and for 2014 it is estimated that China even surpassed the US ($537.0 billion vs. $456.0 billion). In terms of B2C e-commerce turnover, Japan ($136.7 billion) ranked second, followed by Australia ($35.7 billion), South Korea ($20.2 billion) and India ($10.7 billion).

On average, Asian-Pacific e-shoppers spent $1,268 online in 2013
Ecommerce Europe’s research reveals that 235.7 million consumers in Asia-Pacific purchased goods and services online in 2013. On average, APAC online consumers each spent $1,268 online in 2013. This is slightly lower than the global average of $1,304. At $2,167, Australian e-shopper were the biggest spenders online, followed by the Japanese ($1,808) and China ($1,087).

Mobile: Japan and Australia lead the pack
In the frequency of mobile purchasing Japan shows the highest adoption, followed by Japan. An interesting fact is that 50% of transactions are done at home, 20% at work and 10% on the go.

frequency mobile shopping APAC

You can download the full report here. What does this mean for your business opportunity? Read more on the omnichannel trends 2015, which are driving customer experience. Happy to discuss @benrund.

Share
Posted in CMO, Customer Acquisition & Retention, DaaS, Data Quality, Manufacturing, Master Data Management, PiM, Product Information Management, Retail | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Lovenomics: The Price of Love This Valentine’s Day, Cash In on the Hopeless Romantics

retailers

Lovenomics: The Price of Love This Valentine’s Day, Cash In on the Hopeless Romantics

This blog post was originally featured on Business.com here: Lovenomics: The Price of Love This Valentine’s Day.

After the Blue Cross sales that dominate January, Valentine’s Day offers welcome relief to the high street. Valentine’s Day marks the end of Christmas sales and the first of the year’s seasonal hooks providing retailers with an opportunity to upsell. According to the National Retail Federation’s Valentine’s Day Consumer Spending Survey, American consumers plan to spend a total of $4.8 billion on jewelry and a survey high of nearly $2 billion on clothing this year. However, to successfully capture customers, retailers need to develop an omni-channel strategy designed to sell the right product.

Target the indecisive

For the most part, the majority of Valentine’s Day shoppers will be undecided when they begin their purchasing journey. Based on this assumption, a targeted sales approach at the point of interest (POI) and point of sale (POS) will be increasingly important. Not only do retailers need to track and understand the purchasing decision of every customer as they move between channels, but they also need to have a real-time view of the product lines, pricing and content that the competition is using. Once armed with this information, retailers can concentrate on delivering personalized ads or timely product placements that drive consumers to the checkout as they move across different channels.

Related Article: 11 Cheeky Business Valentine’s Day Cards for the BFF In Your Office

Start with search

Consumers will start their shopping journey with a search engine and will rarely scroll past the first page. So brands need to be prepared by turning Valentine’s Day product lines into searchable content. To capture a greater share of online traffic, retailers should concentrate on making relevant products easy to find by managing meta-information, optimizing media assets with the keywords that consumers are using, deploying rich text and automatically sending products to search engines.

Next generation loyalty

Retailers and restaurants can now integrate loyalty schemes into specialized smartphone apps, or maybe integrate customer communication to automatically deliver personalized ads (e.g., offers for last minute gifts for those who forget). However, to ensure success, brands need to know as much about their customers as consumers know about their products. By being able to monitor customers’ behavior, the information that they are looking at and the channels that they are using to interact with brands, loyalty programs can be used to deliver timely special offers or information at the right moment.

Digital signage

Valentine’s Day represents an opportunity to reinvent the in-store experience. By introducing digital signage for special product promotions, retailers can showcase a wide range of eclectic merchandise to showroom consumers. This could be done by targeting any smartphone consumers (who have allowed geo-located ads on their phones) with a personalized text message when they enter the store. Use this message to direct them to the most relevant areas for Valentine’s Day gifts or present them with a customized offer based on previous buying history.

Related Article: Small Business Marketing Tips for Valentine’s Day

Quick fulfillment

supermarkets have become established as the one-stop shop for lovers in a rush. Last year, Tesco, a British multinational grocery and general merchandise retailer, revealed that 85 percent of all Valentine’s Day bouquets were bought on the day itself, with three-quarters of all Valentine’s Day chocolates sold on February 14.

To tap into the last-minute attitude of panicked couples searching for a gift, retailers should have a dedicated Valentine’s Day section online and provide timely offers that come with the promise of delivery in time for Valentine’s Day. For example, BCBGMAXAZRIA is using data quality services to ensure its email list is clean and updated, keeping its sender reputation high so that when they need to reach customers during critical times like Valentine’s Day, they have confidence in their data.

Alternatively, retailers can help customers by closely managing local inventory levels to offer same-day click-and-collect initiatives or showing consumers the number of items that are currently in-stock and in-store across all channels.

Valentine’s Day may seem like a minor holiday after Christmas, but for retailers it generates billions of dollars in annual spending and presents a tremendous opportunity to boost their customer base. With these tips, retailers will hopefully be able to sweeten their sales by effectively targeting customers looking for the perfect gift for their special someone.

Share
Posted in Business Impact / Benefits, Business/IT Collaboration, Data Services, Retail | Tagged , | Leave a comment

A Date with Data

A Date with DataAs Valentine’s Day approaches and retailers & restaurants prepare to sell millions of cards, teddy bears, bottles of champagne and for the lucky few, some expensive jewels, I started to think about my love affair with data and the many ups and downs we had over the years!

Our first date together was arranged by a third party and everything I was told was from their perspective. I had many questions; could I trust data, was I getting the complete picture from the third party, would we be compatible and ultimately “fit for purpose” or would data break my heart!

As we shared information we were both apprehensive, not everything was fitting together, there were gaps in data’s story, and I just could not make an informed decision, this lead to mistrust between the two of us. I stated to ask other friends and associates for their information and tried to reconcile with my view of data. I wanted it to work but what could I do?

A close friend, Stewart, recommended I get some professional advice to help with my issues with data and pointed me towards Doctor Rob, one of the leading authorities on data, specialising in data governance.

The first bit of advice Doctor Rob gave me was; it should never have been about data, the dream must be about your long term goals together, your commitment to get it right, your interactions with others in your circle of friends and dependents.

The second piece of advice was to decide what roles and responsibilities each of us would take on in the relationship. Evaluate if we have the right skills or do we need external support or training to succeed.

While we are still on our journey together data and I are now in a long term committed relationship and look forward to many years on Cloud 9.

Now all I have to decide is will I go to Tiffany’s or Claire’s for that piece of jewellery!

 

 

Share
Posted in Data Governance, Retail | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Magnificent Seven Facts on B2C eCommerce in North America

The latest North American B2C e-commerce market report is out now. For my followers I took the freedom to summarize some “Magnificent Seven Facts on B2C eCommerce in North America” in a short blog.  The report covers United States, Canada and Mexico, but as well comparisons to Europe and Asia. According to this report, North American B2C e-commerce market is expected to reach $494.0 billion in 2014.

The Magnificent Seven Facts

  1. 122.5 million households in North America
  2. 336 million internet users in North America
  3. North America makes up 29.2% of the total global online sales ($1,552.0bn) in 2013.
  4. In terms of global B2C e-commerce, North America ranked third in 2013, behind Asia-Pacific and Europe
  5. North American consumers spent on average$2,116 online in2013. This is significantly above the global average of €1,280.
  6. With an average spending per e-shopper of $2,216, American consumers spent most online in2013. Canadians ranked second with an average spending of $1,577, while Mexican e-shoppers on average spent $1,133 online in2013.
  7. Canadians are more likely to shop mobile

Mobile Commerce: Canada Leads the Pack

Within North America, mobile commerce is most popular in Canada, with more than half of the online purchases per week being made through a mobile device. At 38.2%, US Americans still make their mobile purchases in the safe surroundings of their homes.

What are the barriers preventing mobile purchasing?

barriers mobile shopping north america

Free downloads available now

Would you like to find out more about global e-commerce? The free light versions of our Regional/Continental Reports can be downloaded here.

 

Share
Posted in Data Governance, PiM, Product Information Management, Retail | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Executive Tour – Retail Innovation in NYC

MF-Executive-NewYork-468x60p

Working with executives in retail, distribution and CPG has always been a passion for me and our team. Our MDM in NYC (February 24) is dedicated the theme of “Driving Value from Business Critical Information” and comes with special break out room from 10.30 am – 5.00 pm focussing on “Omnichannel & Product Information Management”.

Customer speakers include:

  1. How product information in ecommerce improved Geiger’s ability to promote and sell promotional products (Triple Award Winner) – Speaker: Mike Plourde, IT Director of Data and Analytics
  2. Harrods: Improving Customer Experience with Product Information – Speaker: Peter Rush, Head of Governance Planning

Informatica & Management Forum present:

Executive Tour – Retail Innovation in NYC

This time, I am proud to have a special partnership in place which allows you to visit an attractive list of retail stores in Manhattan: The list includes Bloomingdale’s, Target, Glossybox, This is Store, Indochino and much more. Did you know, re-inventing the store, was one of the hot topics at NRF, retailers big show early January.

Business partners of Informatica will get a discount for this Executive Tour and will also get free access to Informatica’s MDM Day. If you are interested in the store-tour using the discount for Informatica, please drop me an email.

 

Share
Posted in Data Governance, Master Data Management, PiM, Product Information Management, Retail | Tagged | Leave a comment

Digital Signage helps Reinventing the Store

Reinventing the store was one of the key topics at NRF. Over the last three to four years we have been seeing a lot push and invest for ecommerce innovation and replatforming ecommerce strategies. Now the retail, CPG and brand manufacturers are working on a renaissance of the store and show room, driven by digital. And there is still way to go.

Incremental part of the omnichannel strategy of our PIM customer Murdoch’s Ranch and Home Supply is digital signage for in-store product promotions. This selfie was shot with my dear colleague Thomas Kasemir (VP RnD PIM & Procurement) at the NRF booth of Four Winds Interactive.

IMG_5517

Four Winds serves about 5,000 companies worldwide and I would consider them as one of the market leaders. Alison Rank and her team did show case how static product promotions work and how dynamic personalized product promotions can look like, when John Doe enters the store.

John Doe’s Personalized Purchase Journey

John Doe and his wife are out and about in the city; with the advice from his son, John has created a pro-file on Facebook and Foursquare with his new generation smartphone enabling him to receive any special offers in his vicinity. Mr. Doe has voluntarily agreed to share his data for the specific purpose of allowing retailers to call to his attention any special offers in the area. As both of them have interest in visiting the store they respond to the offer.

At the entrance to the store he is advised to start up the special store app and is promised a “personalized shopping” experience. As John Doe enters the store, a friendly greeting appears on his digital signage screen: “Welcome Mr. Doe, the men’s suits are on the 3rd floor and we have the following offers for you.” Upon reaching the 3rd floor, the salesperson is already standing there with the right suit. The suit is one size smaller than usual, but it fits John Doe. After the fitting, the salesperson even points out the new women’s hat collection in the women’s department. Satisfied with their purchases, Mr. and Mrs. Doe leave the store.

For me it is clear assuming that the future of shopping will look something like this, due to the fact that all of these technologies are already available. But what has taken place? The reason why John Doe receives location-based offers has already been explained above; the point that needs to be made is that there is now the ability to link personal and statistical data to customers. By means of the app, the store already knows whom they are dealing with as soon as they enter the store. Or can messaging services be used to send an alert to a shop assistant that a A-Customer with high value shopping carts has just entered the store.

To this point, stores can leverage both personal information as well as location-based information to generate a personal greeting for the customer.

  • What did he buy? In which department was he and for how long?
  • When did he purchase his last suit(s)?
  • What sizes were these?
  • Does he have an online profile?
  • What does he order online and does he finish the transaction?

All of this analytical data can be stored and retrieved behind the scenes. 

Catch Me if I Want

The targeted sales approach at the point of interest (POI) and point of sale (POS) is considered to be increasingly important.  This type of communication is becoming dynamic and is taking precedent over traditional forms of advertising.

When entering the store today, customers are for the most part undecided. Based on this assumption, they can be influenced by ads and targeted product placement.  Customers are now willing to disclose their location data and personal information provided there is added value for them to do so.

Example from Vapiano Restaurant

A good example is the Vapiano restaurant chain. Vapiano restaurants take an extra step further than the tradi-tional loyalty card by utilizing a special smartphone app where the customer can not only choose the nearest restau-rant along with special offers and menu, but also receive a kind of credit after payment via barcode. After collecting 10 credits, the restaurant guest receives a main course for free on the 11th visit. Sound good? It sure does, and from the company’s perspective this is a win-win situation. These obvious benefits move the customer to disclose his or her eating habits and personal data. The restaurant chain now has access to their birth dates, which is rewarded as well. This data aggregation is definitely recommendable, since it requires the guest’s explicit consent and assumes a certain degree of active participation from the guest to be eligible for the rewards offered by the restaurant.

Summary

If John Doe allowed my as brand manufacturer in my showroom or as a retailer to catch him, companies will need to ensure that they are really able to identity John Doe wit this all channel customer profile to come up with a personalized offer on digital signage. But this needs to be covered in an additional blogs…

Share
Posted in Data Governance, Manufacturing, Master Data Management, PiM, Product Information Management, Real-Time, Retail, Ultra Messaging | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Getting Personal with Data as a Service (DaaS)

Getting Personal with Data as a Service (DaaS)

Getting Personal with Data as a Service (DaaS)

Last week, I spent three days at Retail’s Big Show hosted by the National Retail Federation (NRF) in New York City. This annual event gives retailers the opportunity to network with their colleagues from all over the world. In addition, they get the chance to interact with technology vendors that can help them improve their business.

From marketing automation to analytics software, there were countless technology offerings showcasing how to best assist the modern marketer in making every customer interaction personal. Throughout the week, I had numerous conversations with retail professionals about the importance of personalization in marketing and what it means to their organization’s future plans.

At the heart of their plans was the need to understand the data that they have today, and how to verify the data that they will inevitably acquire in the future. If it’s accurate, if it’s reliable, if it’s complete – customer data can fuel your ability to engage and interact.

The data driven marketer derives insight and ultimately provides a personalized experience by leveraging this valuable data for each customer.

And why is this important?

Well, according to McMurrayTMG, 78% of buyers believe that organizations providing a personalized experience are interested in building good relationships. But it all starts with accurate data.

Knowing who your customers are, how you can contact them, and what they are interested in are essential in order to engage with your customers. With the abundance of data available today, you have to figure that if you aren’t ensuring that your customer interactions are personalized, then your competitors are gaining ground. Every interaction, every correspondence counts towards a positive perception as well as increased sales and customer satisfaction.

By fueling your interactions with Data as a Service (DaaS) for accurate customer data, you will ensure that your customers have a personalized experience with your brand and ultimately accelerate your business.

Share
Posted in CMO, Customer Acquisition & Retention, Customers, DaaS, Data Quality, Retail, Total Customer Relationship | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Smarter Dummies, Connected Hangers and Personalized Mirrors!

Smarter Dummies, Connected Hangers and Personalized Mirrors

Smarter Dummies, Connected Hangers and Personalized Mirrors

With CES and the NRF Big Show just over and many exhibitors talking about the “Internet of Things” below I take a quick look at what is happening for retailers with the “Internet of Things”.

Consumer demand is driving the adoption of IoT as they embrace the new technology to improve health (Garmin Vívoactive), energy savings (NEST), safety (BeClose) and a better overall experience including shopping (beacons?). However, getting the balance between privacy, intrusion and relevance can be tricky for both the retailer and shopper.

While shoppers are willing to give up some level of privacy in return for personalization, I am not convinced most are ready of what the “Internet of Things” brings. I recently purchased a smart TV and was surprised when I was asked to accept terms and conditions before using, what are they capturing, how will it be used, will I see any benefits?  Retailers need to demonstrate value and trust to the consumer.

While RFID has been around for many years the next wave of intelligent “things” bring both opportunities and challenges. Retailers need to decide which ones truly enhance the shopping experience.

“Psst! It’s Me, the Mannequin. This Would Look Great on You.” (Rachel Abrams, NY Times)

Smart Dummies (mannequins) – Last year House of Fraser started rolling out beacon-enabled mannequins to engage directly with shoppers and passers-by. Shoppers within a 50-metre range will receive information from the mannequins, which may include details about the clothes on display, with links to make a purchase from a website, or details of where the outfit can be found in the store. The next step could link customer preferences, profile and past purchases and suggest matching accessories, check customers size availability or monitor how long they browsed and offer a digital coupon.

Connected Hangers – While you browse through the racks, real-time reviews are displayed on the hanger, size availability or images & videos displayed on screens showing the garment in use. Retailers can capture how popular an item is but never purchased.  Taking the clothes and hanger try on could provide personalized recommendation on shoes and accessories.

Personalized Mirrors – I recently read an article in Time (Dec 29th) about Rebecca Minkoff’s new store in Manhattan, where they installed a giant mirrored panel showing images of models walking down the runway. The panel acts as a mirror and touchscreen, where shoppers can order up a personalized fitting room, offering style tips based on their selection. This is connected to a mobile app that saves their browsing history and style preferences for their next visit. When a customer is ready to purchase a sales assistant takes payment on an iPad.

In future blog I will discuss how location based services are machine-to-machine technologies are impacting retailers and consumers.

Data Privacy

With so many devices connected and larger volumes of data captured this raises concerns around data privacy and security. In the past year we have seen too many stores on data breaches and retailers. While shoppers are prepared to share more information for relevance they expect you to keep it safe and secure. Retailers must have a solid data governance framework and process in place or risk losing the trust and loyalty of their customers.

Sensor Driven Analytics

The Internet of Things presents retailers with a wonderfully opportunity to understand and engage the customer like never before. However, retailers need to manage the explosion of data available through smarter devices to gain insight into shopper behaviours and preferences and turn into a more rewarding experience for the consumer.

However, before loading an analytics engine they need to ensure the data is clean, connected and safe. Without this any decisions made are flawed and will impact their brand and ultimately the bottom line.

Share
Posted in Customer Acquisition & Retention, Customers, Retail | Tagged , , | Leave a comment