Category Archives: Data Security

3 Ways to Sell Data Integration Internally

3 Ways to Sell Data Integration Internally

Selling data integration internally

So, you need to grab some budget for a data integration project, but know one understands what data integration is, what business problems it solves, and it’s difficult to explain without a white board and a lot of time.  I’ve been there.

I’ve “sold” data integration as a concept for the last 20 years.  Let me tell you, it’s challenging to define the benefits to those who don’t work with this technology every day.  That said, most of the complaints I hear about enterprise IT are around the lack of data integration, and thus the inefficiencies that go along with that lack, such as re-keying data, data quality issues, lack of automation across systems, and so forth.

Considering that most of you will sell data integration to your peers and leadership, I’ve come up with 3 proven ways to sell data integration internally.

First, focus on the business problems.  Use real world examples from your own business.  It’s not tough to find any number of cases where the data was just not there to make core operational decisions that could have avoided some huge mistakes that proved costly to the company.  Or, more likely, there are things like ineffective inventory management that has no way to understand when orders need to be place.  Or, there’s the go-to standard: No single definition of what a “customer” or a “sale” is amongst the systems that support the business.  That one is like back pain, everyone has it at some point.

Second, define the business case in practical terms with examples.  Once you define the business problems that exist due to lack of a sound data integration strategy and technologies, it’s time to put money behind those numbers.  Those in IT have a tendency to either way overstate, or way understate the amount of money that’s being wasted and thus could be saved by using data integration approaches and technology.  So, provide practical numbers that you can back-up with existing data.

Finally, focus on a phased approach to implementing your data integration solution.  The “Big Bang Theory” is a great way to define the beginning of the universe, but it’s not the way you want to define the rollout of your data integration technology.  Define a workable plan that moves from one small grouping of systems and databases to another, over time, and with a reasonable amount of resources and technology.  You do this to remove risk from the effort, as well as manage costs, and insure that you can dial lessons learned back into the efforts.  I would rather roll out data integration within an enterprises using small teams and more problem domains, than attempt to do everything within a few years.

The reality is that data integration is no longer optional for enterprises these days.  It’s required for so many reasons, from data sharing, information visibility, compliance, security, automation…the list goes on and on.  IT needs to take point on this effort.  Selling data integration internally is the first and most important step.  Go get ‘em.

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Posted in Data Integration, Data Integration Platform, Data Quality, Data Security | Tagged | Leave a comment

Master Data and Data Security …It’s Not Complicated

Master Data and Data Security…It’s Not Complicated

Master Data and Data Security…It’s Not Complicated

The statement on Master Data and Data security was well intended.  I can certainly understand the angst around data security.  Especially after Target’s data breach, it is top of mind for all IT and now business executives.  But the root of the statement was flawed.  And it got me thinking about master data and data security.

“If I use master data technology to create a 360-degree view of my client and I have a data breach, then someone could steal all the information about my client.”

Um, wait, what?  Insurance companies take personally identifiable information very seriously.  The statement is flawed in the relationship between client master data and securing your client data.  Let’s dissect the statement and see what master data and data security really mean for insurers.  We’ll start by level setting a few concepts.

What is your Master Client Record?

Your master client record is your 360-degree view of your client.  It represents everything about your client.  It uses Master Data Management technology to virtually integrate and syndicate all of that data into a single view.  It leverages identifiers to ensure integrity in the view of the client record.  And finally it makes an effort through identifiers to correlate client records for a network effect.

There are benefits to understanding everything about your client.  The shape and view of each client is specific to your business.  As an insurer looks at their policyholders, the view of “client” is based on relationships and context that the client has to the insurer.  This are policies, claims, family relationships, history of activities and relationships with agency channels.

And what about security?

Naturally there is private data in a client record.  But there is nothing about the consolidated client record that contains any more or less personally identifiable information.  In fact, most of the data that a malicious party would be searching for can likely be found in just a handful of database locations.  Additionally breaches happen “on the wire”.  Policy numbers, credit card info, social security numbers, and birth dates can be found in less than five database tables.  And they can be found without a whole lot of intelligence or analysis.

That data should be secured.  That means that the data should be encrypted or masked so that any breach will protect the data.  Informatica’s data masking technology allows this data to be secured in whatever location.  It provides access control so that only the right people and applications can see the data in an unsecured format.  You could even go so far as to secure ALL of your client record data fields.  That’s a business and application choice.  Do not confuse field or database level security with a decision to NOT assemble your golden policyholder record.

What to worry about?  And what not to worry about?

Do not succumb to fear of mastering your policyholder data.  Master Data Management technology can provide a 360-degree view.  But it is only meaningful within your enterprise and applications.  The view of “client” is very contextual and coupled with your business practices, products and workflows.  Even if someone breaches your defenses and grabs data, they’re looking for the simple PII and financial data.  Then they’re grabbing it and getting out. If the attacker could see your 360-degree view of a client, they wouldn’t understand it.  So don’t over complicate the security of your golden policyholder record.  As long as you have secured the necessary data elements, you’re good to go.  The business opportunity cost of NOT mastering your policyholder data far outweighs any imagined risk to PII breach.

So what does your Master Policyholder Data allow you to do?

Imagine knowing more about your policyholders.  Let that soak in for a bit.  It feels good to think that you can make it happen.  And you can do it.  For an insurer, Master Data Management provides powerful opportunities across everything from sales, marketing, product development, claims and agency engagement.  Each channel and activity has discreet ROI.  It also has direct line impact on revenue, policyholder satisfaction and market share.  Let’s look at just a few very real examples that insurers are attempting to tackle today.

  1. For a policyholder of a certain demographic with an auto and home policy, what is the next product my agent should discuss?
  2. How many people live in a certain policyholder’s household?  Are there any upcoming teenage drivers?
  3. Does this personal lines policyholder own a small business?  Are they a candidate for a business packaged policy?
  4. What is your policyholder claims history?  What about prior carriers and network of suppliers?
  5. How many touch points have your agents and had with your policyholders?  Were they meaningful?
  6. How can you connect with you policyholders in social media settings and make an impact?
  7. What is your policyholder mobility usage and what are they doing online that might interest your Marketing team?

These are just some of the examples of very streamlined connections that you can make with your policyholders once you have your 360-degree view. Imagine the heavy lifting required to do these things without a Master Policyholder record.

Fear is the enemy of innovation.  In mastering policyholder data it is important to have two distinct work streams.  First, secure the necessary data elements using data masking technology.  Once that is secure, gain understanding through the mastering of your policyholder record.  Only then will you truly be able to take your clients’ experience to the next level.  When that happens watch your revenue grow in leaps and bounds.

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Takeaways from the Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit (2014)

Last week I had the opportunity to attend the Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit. At this event, Gartner analysts and security industry experts meet to discuss the latest trends, advances, best practices and research in the space. At the event, I had the privilege of connecting with customers, peers and partners. I was also excited to learn about changes that are shaping the data security landscape.

Here are some of the things I learned at the event:

  • Security continues to be a top CIO priority in 2014. Security is well-aligned with other trends such as big data, IoT, mobile, cloud, and collaboration. According to Gartner, the top CIO priority area is BI/analytics. Given our growing appetite for all things data and our increasing ability to mine data to increase top-line growth, this top billing makes perfect sense. The challenge is to protect the data assets that drive value for the company and ensure appropriate privacy controls.
  • Mobile and data security are the top focus for 2014 spending in North America according to Gartner’s pre-conference survey. Cloud rounds out the list when considering worldwide spending results.
  • Rise of the DRO (Digital Risk Officer). Fortunately, those same market trends are leading to an evolution of the CISO role to a Digital Security Officer and, longer term, a Digital Risk Officer. The DRO role will include determination of the risks and security of digital connectivity. Digital/Information Security risk is increasingly being reported as a business impact to the board.
  • Information management and information security are blending. Gartner assumes that 40% of global enterprises will have aligned governance of the two programs by 2017. This is not surprising given the overlap of common objectives such as inventories, classification, usage policies, and accountability/protection.
  • Security methodology is moving from a reactive approach to compliance-driven and proactive (risk-based) methodologies. There is simply too much data and too many events for analysts to monitor. Organizations need to understand their assets and their criticality. Big data analytics and context-aware security is then needed to reduce the noise and false positive rates to a manageable level. According to Gartner analyst Avivah Litan, ”By 2018, of all breaches that are detected within an enterprise, 70% will be found because they used context-aware security, up from 10% today.”

I want to close by sharing the identified Top Digital Security Trends for 2014

  • Software-defined security
  • Big data security analytics
  • Intelligent/Context-aware security controls
  • Application isolation
  • Endpoint threat detection and response
  • Website protection
  • Adaptive access
  • Securing the Internet of Things
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Posted in Big Data, CIO, Data Governance, Data Privacy, Data Security, Governance, Risk and Compliance | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Data Obfuscation and Data Value – Can They Coexist?

Data Obfuscation and Data Value

Data Obfuscation and Data Value

Data is growing exponentially. New technologies are at the root of the growth. With the advent of big data and machine data, enterprises have amassed amounts of data never before seen. Consider the example of Telecommunications companies. Telco has always collected large volumes of call data and customer data. However, the advent of 4G services, combined with the explosion of the mobile internet, has created data volume Telco has never seen before.

In response to the growth, organizations seek new ways to unlock the value of their data. Traditionally, data has been analyzed for a few key reasons. First, data was analyzed in order to identify ways to improve operational efficiency. Secondly, data was analyzed to identify opportunities to increase revenue.

As data expands, companies have found new uses for these growing data sets. Of late, organizations have started providing data to partners, who then sell the ‘intelligence’ they glean from within the data. Consider a coffee shop owner whose store doesn’t open until 8 AM. This owner would be interested in learning how many target customers (Perhaps people aged 25 to 45) walk past the closed shop between 6 AM and 8 AM. If this number is high enough, it may make sense to open the store earlier.

As much as organizations prioritize the value of data, customers prioritize the privacy of data. If an organization loses a customer’s data, it results in a several costs to the organization. These costs include:

  • Damage to the company’s reputation
  • A reduction of customer trust
  • Financial costs associated with the investigation of the loss
  • Possible governmental fines
  • Possible restitution costs

To guard against these risks, data that organizations provide to their partners must be obfuscated. This protects customer privacy. However, data that has been obfuscated is often of a lower value to the partner. For example, if the date of birth of those passing the coffee shop has been obfuscated, the store owner may not be able to determine if those passing by are potential customers. When data is obfuscated without consideration of the analysis that needs to be done, analysis results may not be correct.

There is away to provide data privacy for the customer while simultaneously monetizing enterprise data. To do so, organizations must allow trusted partners to define masking generalizations. With sufficient data masking governance, it is indeed possible for data obfuscation and data value to coexist.

Currently, there is a great deal of research around ensuring that obfuscated data is both protected and useful. Techniques and algorithms like ‘k-Anonymity’ and ‘l-Diversity’ ensure that sensitive data is safe and secure. However, these techniques have have not yet become mainstream. Once they do, the value of big data will be unlocked.

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Posted in Application ILM, B2B Data Exchange, Data masking, Data Privacy, Data Security, Telecommunications | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

New type of CFO represents a potent CIO ally

The strategic CFO is different than the “1975 Controller CFO”

CFOTraditionally, CIOs have tended to work with what one CIO called a “1975 Controller CFO”. For this reason, the relationship between CIOs and CFOs was expressed well in a single word “contentious”. But a new type of CFO is emerging that offers the potential of different type of relationship. These so called “strategic CFOs” can be an effective ally for CIOs. The question is which type of CFO do you have? In this post, I will provide you with a bit of a litmus test so you can determine what type of CFO you have but more importantly, I will share how you can take maximum advantage of having a strategic-oriented CFO relationship. But first let’s hear a bit more of the CIOs reactions to CFOs.

Views of CIOs according to CIO interviews

downloadClearly, “the relationship…with these CFOs is filled with friction”. Controller CFOs “do not get why so many things require IT these days. They think that things must be out of whack. One CIO said that they think technology should only cost 2-3% of revenue while it can easily reach 8-9% of revenue these days.” Another CIO complained by saying their discussion with a Controller CFOs is only about IT productivity and effectiveness. In their eyes, this has limited the topics of discussion to IT cost reduction, IT produced business savings, and the soundness of the current IT organization. Unfortunately, this CIO believe that Controller CFOs are not concerned with creating business value or sees information as an asset. Instead, they view IT as a cost center. Another CIO says Controller CFOs are just about the numbers and see the CIO role as being about signing checks. It is a classic “demand versus supply” issue. At the same times, CIOs say that they see reporting to Controller CFO as a narrowing function. As well, they believe it signals to the rest of the organization “that IT is not strategic and less important than other business functions”.

What then is this strategic CFO?

bean counterIn contrast to their controller peers, strategic CFOs often have a broader business background than their accounting and a CPA peers. Many have, also, pursued an MBA. Some have public accounting experience. Others yet come from professions like legal, business development, or investment banking.

More important than where they came from, strategic CFOs see a world that is about more than just numbers. They want to be more externally facing and to understand their company’s businesses. They tend to focus as much on what is going to happen as they do on what has happened. Remember, financial accounting is backward facing. Given this, strategic CFOs spend a lot of time trying to understand what is going on in their firm’s businesses. One strategic CFO said that they do this so they can contribute and add value—I want to be a true business leader. And taking this posture often puts them in the top three decision makers for their business. There may be lessons in this posture for technology focused CIOs.

Why is a strategic CFO such a game changer for CIO?

Business DecisionsOne CIO put it this way. “If you have a modern day CFO, then they are an enabler of IT”. Strategic CFO’s agree. Strategic CFOs themselves as having the “the most concentric circles with the CIO”. They believe that they need “CIOs more than ever to extract data to do their jobs better and to provide the management information business leadership needs to make better business decisions”. At the same time, the perspective of a strategic CFO can be valuable to the CIO because they have good working knowledge of what the business wants. They, also, tend to be close to the management information systems and computer systems. CFOs typically understand the needs of the business better than most staff functions. The CFOs, therefore, can be the biggest advocate of the CIO. This is why strategic CFOs should be on the CIOs Investment Committee. Finally, a strategic CFO can help a CIO ensure their technology selections meet affordability targets and are compliant with the corporate strategy.

Are the priorities of a strategic CFO different?

Strategic CFOs still care P&L, Expense Management, Budgetary Control, Compliance, and Risk Management. But they are also concerned about performance management for the enterprise as whole and senior management reporting. As well they, they want to do the above tasks faster so finance and other functions can do in period management by exception. For this reason they see data and data analysis as a big issue.

Strategic CFOs care about data integration

In interviews of strategic CFOs, I saw a group of people that truly understand the data holes in the current IT system. And they intuit firsthand the value proposition of investing to fix things here. These CFOs say that they worry “about the integrity of data from the source and about being able to analyze information”. They say that they want the integration to be good enough that at the push of button they can get an accurate report. Otherwise, they have to “massage the data and then send it through another system to get what you need”.

These CFOs say that they really feel the pain of systems not talking to each other. They understand this means making disparate systems from the frontend to the backend talk to one another. But they, also, believe that making things less manual will drive important consequences including their own ability to inspect books more frequently. Given this, they see data as a competitive advantage. One CFO even said that they thought data is the last competitive advantage.

Strategic CFOs are also worried about data security. They believe their auditors are going after this with a vengeance. They are really worried about getting hacked. One said, “Target scared a lot of folks and was to many respects a watershed event”. At the same time, Strategic CFOs want to be able to drive synergies across the business. One CFO even extolled the value of a holistic view of customer. When I asked why this was a finance objective versus a marketing objective, they said finance is responsible for business metrics and we have gaps in our business metrics around customer including the percentage of cross sell is taking place between our business units. Another CFO amplified on this theme by saying that “increasingly we need to manage upward with information. For this reason, we need information for decision makers so they can make better decisions”. Another strategic CFO summed this up by saying “the integration of the right systems to provide the right information needs to be done so we and the business have the right information to manage and make decisions at the right time”.

So what are you waiting for?

If you are lucky enough to have a Strategic CFO, start building your relationship. And you can start by discussing their data integration and data quality problems. So I have a question for you. How many of you think you have a Controller CFO versus a Strategic CFO? Please share here.

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The Power and Security of Exponential Data

The Power and Security of Exponential Data

The Power and Security of Exponential Data

I recently heard a couple different analogies for data. The first is that data is the “new oil.” Data is a valuable resource that powers global business. Consequently, it is targeted for theft by hackers. The thinking is this: People are not after your servers, they’re after your data.

The other comparison is that data is like solar power. Like solar power, data is abundant. In addition, it’s getting cheaper and more efficient to harness. The juxtaposition of these images captures the current sentiment around data’s potential to improve our lives in many ways. For this to happen, however, corporations and data custodians must effectively balance the power of data with security and privacy concerns.

Many people have a preconception of security as an obstacle to productivity. Actually, good security practitioners understand that the purpose of security is to support the goals of the company by allowing the business to innovate and operate more quickly and effectively. Think back to the early days of online transactions; many people were not comfortable banking online or making web purchases for fear of fraud and theft. Similar fears slowed early adoption of mobile phone banking and purchasing applications. But security ecosystems evolved, concerns were addressed, and now Gartner estimates that worldwide mobile payment transaction values surpass $235B in 2013. An astute security executive once pointed out why cars have brakes: not to slow us down, but to allow us to drive faster, safely.

The pace of digital change and the current proliferation of data is not a simple linear function – it’s growing exponentially – and it’s not going to slow down. I believe this is generally a good thing. Our ability to harness data is how we will better understand our world. It’s how we will address challenges with critical resources such as energy and water. And it’s how we will innovate in research areas such as medicine and healthcare. And so, as a relatively new Informatica employee coming from a security background, I’m now at a crossroads of sorts. While Informatica’s goal of “Putting potential to work” resonates with my views and helps customers deliver on the promise of this data growth, I know we need to have proper controls in place. I’m proud to be part of a team building a new intelligent, context-aware approach to data security (Secure@SourceTM).

We recently announced Secure@SourceTM during InformaticaWorld 2014. One thing that impressed me was how quickly attendees (many of whom have little security background) understood how they could leverage data context to improve security controls, privacy, and data governance for their organizations. You can find a great introduction summary of Secure@SourceTM here.

I will be sharing more on Secure@SourceTM and data security in general, and would love to get your feedback. If you are an Informatica customer and would like to help shape the product direction, we are recruiting a select group of charter customers to drive and provide feedback for the first release. Customers who are interested in being a charter customer should register and send email to SecureCustomers@informatica.com.

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The Business Case for Better Data Connectivity

andyAfter I graduated from business school, I started reading Fortune Magazine. I guess that I became a regular reader because each issue largely consists of a set of mini-business cases. And over the years, I have even started to read the witty remarks from the managing editor, Andy Serwer. However, this issue’s comments were even more evocative than usual.

Connectivity is perhaps the biggest opportunity of our time

Andy wrote, “Connectivity is perhaps the biggest opportunity of our time. As technology makes the world smaller, it is clear that the countries and companies that connect the best—either in terms of, say traditional infrastructure or through digital networks are in the drivers’ seat”. Andy sees differentiated connectivity as involving two elements–access and content. This is important to note because Andy believes the biggest winners going forward are going to be the best connectors to each.

Enterprises need to evaluate how the collect, refine, and make useful data

But how do enterprises establish world class connectivity to content? I would argue–whether you are talking about large or small data—it comes from improving an data connectivityenterprise’s abiity collect, refine, and create useful data. In recent CFO research, the importance of enterprise data gathering capabilities was stressed. CFOs said that their enterprises need to “get data right” at the same time as they confirmed that their enterprises in fact have a data issue. The CFOs said that they are worried about the integrity of data from the source forward. And once they manually create clean data, they worry about making this data useful to their enterprises. Why does this data matter so much to the CFO? Because as CFOs get more strategic, they are trying to make sure their firms drive synergies across their businesses.

Business need to make sense of data and get it to business users faster

One CFO said it this way, “data is potentially the only competitive advantage left”. Yet another said, “our businesses needs to make better decisions from data. We need to make sense of data faster.” At the same time leading edge thinkers like Geoffrey Moore has been mooresuggesting that businesses need to move from “systems of record” applications to “system of engagement” applications. This notion suggests the importance of providing more digestible apps, but also the importance of recognizing that the most important apps for business users will provide relevant information for decision making. Put another way, data is clearly becoming fuel to the enterprise decision making.

“Data Fueled Apps” will provide a connectivity advantage

For this reason, “data fueled” apps will be increasingly important to the business. Decision makers these days want to practice “management by walking around” to quote Tom Walking aroundPeter’s Book, “In Search of Excellence”. And this means having critical, fresh data at their fingertips for each and every meeting. And clearly, organizations that provide this type of data connectivity will establish the connectivity advantage that Serwer suggested in his editor comments. This of course applies to consumer facing apps as well. Server, also, comments on the impacts of Apple and Facebook. Most consumers today are far better informed before they make a purchase.  The customer facing apps, for example Amazon, that have led the way have provided the relevant information for the consumer to inform them on their purchase journey.

Delivering “Data Fueled Apps” to the Enterprise

But how do you create the enterprise wide connectivity to power the “Data Fueled Apps?”  It is clear from the CFOs comments work is needed here. That work involves creating data which is systematically clean, safe, and connected. Why does this data need to be clean? The CFOs we talked to said that when the data is not clean then they have to manually massage the data and then move from system to system. This is not providing the kind of system of engagement envisioned by Geoffrey Moore. What this CFO wants to move to a world where he can access the numbers easily, timely, and accurately”.

Data, also, needs to be safe. This means that only people with access should be able to see data whether we are talking about transactional or analytical data. This may sound obvious, but very few isolate and secure data as it moves from system to system. And lastly, data needs to be connected. Yet another CFO said, “the integration of the right systems to provide the right information needs to be done so we have the right information to manage and make decisions at the right time”. He continued by saying “we really care about technology integration and getting it less manual. It means that we can inspect the books half way through the cycle. And getting less manual means we can close the books even faster. However, if systems don’t talk (connect) to one another, it is a big issue”.

Finally, whether we are discussing big data or small data, we need to make sure the data collected is more relevant and easier to consume.  What is needed here is a data intelligence layer provides easy ways to locate useful data and recommend or guide ways to improve the data. This way analysts and leaders can spend less time on searching or preparing data and more time on analyzing the data to connect the business dots. This can involve mapping data relationship across all applications and being able to draw inferences from data to drive real time responses.

So in this new connected world, we need to first set up a data infrastructure to continuously make data clean, safe, and connected regardless of use case. It might not be needed to collect data, but the data infrastructure may be needed to define the connectivity (in the shape of access and content). We also need to make sure that the infrastructure for doing this is reusable so that the time from concept to new data fueled app is minimized. And then to drive informational meaning, we need to layer on top the intelligence. With this, we can deliver “data fueled apps” that enable business users the access and content to drive better business differentiation and decisioning!

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The Case for Data Centric Security

The Case for Data Centric Security

It’s 10:00 – Do you know where your data is?

If your job is securing data, it’s growing harder to get a good night’s sleep. According to Forbes, the financial cost of last year’s Target data breach “may reach as much as $18 billion, once all is said and done.”

The frequency of data breach incidents continues to increase. The cost per lost record is rising as well. But none of these concerns (total cost, breach frequency, cost per record) is the main worry of IT staff: Instead, IT professions wonder WHERE their sensitive data is.

It’s 10:00 – Do you know where your data is?

According to recent research by the Ponemon Institute, there is a specific concern that robs IT security professionals of a peaceful night’s rest: They don’t know where their organization’s sensitive or confidential data resides.

After surveying more than 1,500 responders, across 16 industries, Ponemon discovered the following:

  • 57% say the unknown location of their sensitive or confidential data keeps them awake.
  • Only 23% say their company data access levels are appropriate.
  • Only 16% know where sensitive structured data is located.
  • Only 7% know where sensitive unstructured data resides.

To explore these fascinating findings, read “Ponemon Report: Hidden Data is Your Biggest Nightmare“.

A lack of visibility into data workflow creates excessive risk. This is why organizations must consider the power of data centric security. Data centric security allows you to assign a policy, when data is created, that follows that data, wherever it proliferates. If you work in data security, what would help you sleep better? Would you rest easy if you knew you could:

  1. Discover all instances of sensitive data?
  2. Visualize the risk?
  3. Map the common source of proliferation?

If you could secure data at its source, throughout its life-cycle, why wouldn’t you? After all, if I had $18 billion dollars in my wallet, I’d sleep better if I knew where I set it down.

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