Category Archives: Complex Event Processing

History Repeats Itself Through Business Intelligence (Part 2)

liftcar

In a previous blog post, I wrote about when business “history” is reported via Business Intelligence (BI) systems, it’s usually too late to make a real difference.  In this post, I’m going to talk about how business history becomes much more useful when combined operationally and in real time.

E. P. Thompson, a historian pointed out that all history is the history of unintended consequences.  His idea / theory was that history is not always recorded in documents, but instead is ultimately derived from examining cultural meanings as well as the structures of society  through hermeneutics (interpretation of texts) semiotics and in many forms and signs of the times, and concludes that history is created by people’s subjectivity and therefore is ultimately represented as they REALLY live.

The same can be extrapolated for businesses.  However, the BI systems of today only capture a miniscule piece of the larger pie of knowledge representation that may be gained from things like meetings, videos, sales calls, anecdotal win / loss reports, shadow IT projects, 10Ks and Qs, even company blog posts ;-)   – the point is; how can you better capture the essence of meaning and perhaps importance out of the everyday non-database events taking place in your company and its activities – in other words, how it REALLY operates.

One of the keys to figuring out how businesses really operate is identifying and utilizing those undocumented RULES that are usually underlying every business.  Select company employees, often veterans, know these rules intuitively. If you watch them, and every company has them, they just have a knack for getting projects pushed through the system, or making customers happy, or diagnosing a problem in a short time and with little fanfare.  They just know how things work and what needs to be done.

These rules have been, and still are difficult to quantify and apply or “Data-ify” if you will. Certain companies (and hopefully Informatica) will end up being major players in the race to datify these non-traditional rules and events, in addition to helping companies make sense out of big data in a whole new way. But in daydreaming about it, it’s not hard to imagine business systems that will eventually be able to understand the optimization rules of a business, accounting for possible unintended scenarios or consequences, and then apply them in the time when they are most needed.  Anyhow, that’s the goal of a new generation of Operational Intelligence systems.

In my final post on the subject, I’ll explain how it works and business problems it solves (in a nutshell). And if I’ve managed to pique your curiosity and you want to hear about Operational Intelligence sooner, tune in to to a webinar we’re having TODAY at 10 AM PST. Here’s the link.

http://www.informatica.com/us/company/informatica-talks/?commid=97187

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrintShare
Posted in Big Data, Business Impact / Benefits, Business/IT Collaboration, CIO, Complex Event Processing, Data Integration Platform, Operational Efficiency, Real-Time, SOA, Ultra Messaging | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Murphy’s First Law of Bad Data – If You Make A Small Change Without Involving Your Client – You Will Waste Heaps Of Money

I have not used my personal encounter with bad data management for over a year but a couple of weeks ago I was compelled to revive it.  Why you ask? Well, a complete stranger started to receive one of my friend’s text messages – including mine – and it took days for him to detect it and a week later nobody at this North American wireless operator had been able to fix it.  This coincided with a meeting I had with a European telco’s enterprise architecture team.  There was no better way to illustrate to them how a customer reacts and the risk to their operations, when communication breaks down due to just one tiny thing changing – say, his address (or in the SMS case, some random SIM mapping – another type of address).

Imagine the cost of other bad data (thecodeproject.com)

Imagine the cost of other bad data (thecodeproject.com)

In my case, I  moved about 250 miles within the United States a couple of years ago and this seemingly common experience triggered a plethora of communication screw ups across every merchant a residential household engages with frequently, e.g. your bank, your insurer, your wireless carrier, your average retail clothing store, etc.

For more than two full years after my move to a new state, the following things continued to pop up on a monthly basis due to my incorrect customer data:

  • In case of my old satellite TV provider they got to me (correct person) but with a misspelled last name at my correct, new address.
  • My bank put me in a bit of a pickle as they sent “important tax documentation”, which I did not want to open as my new tenants’ names (in the house I just vacated) was on the letter but with my new home’s address.
  • My mortgage lender sends me a refinancing offer to my new address (right person & right address) but with my wife’s as well as my name completely butchered.
  • My wife’s airline, where she enjoys the highest level of frequent flyer status, continually mails her offers duplicating her last name as her first name.
  • A high-end furniture retailer sends two 100-page glossy catalogs probably costing $80 each to our address – one for me, one for her.
  • A national health insurer sends “sensitive health information” (disclosed on envelope) to my new residence’s address but for the prior owner.
  • My legacy operator turns on the wrong premium channels on half my set-top boxes.
  • The same operator sends me a SMS the next day thanking me for switching to electronic billing as part of my move, which I did not sign up for, followed by payment notices (as I did not get my invoice in the mail).  When I called this error out for the next three months by calling their contact center and indicating how much revenue I generate for them across all services, they counter with “sorry, we don’t have access to the wireless account data”, “you will see it change on the next bill cycle” and “you show as paper billing in our system today”.

Ignoring the potential for data privacy law suits, you start wondering how long you have to be a customer and how much money you need to spend with a merchant (and they need to waste) for them to take changes to your data more seriously.  And this are not even merchants to whom I am brand new – these guys have known me and taken my money for years!

One thing I nearly forgot…these mailings all happened at least once a month on average, sometimes twice over 2 years.  If I do some pigeon math here, I would have estimated the postage and production cost alone to run in the hundreds of dollars.

However, the most egregious trespass though belonged to my home owner’s insurance carrier (HOI), who was also my mortgage broker.  They had a double whammy in store for me.  First, I received a cancellation notice from the HOI for my old residence indicating they had cancelled my policy as the last payment was not received and that any claims will be denied as a consequence.  Then, my new residence’s HOI advised they added my old home’s HOI to my account.

After wondering what I could have possibly done to trigger this, I called all four parties (not three as the mortgage firm did not share data with the insurance broker side – surprise, surprise) to find out what had happened.

It turns out that I had to explain and prove to all of them how one party’s data change during my move erroneously exposed me to liability.  It felt like the old days, when seedy telco sales people needed only your name and phone number and associate it with some sort of promotion (back of a raffle card to win a new car), you never took part in, to switch your long distance carrier and present you with a $400 bill the coming month.  Yes, that also happened to me…many years ago.  Here again, the consumer had to do all the legwork when someone (not an automatic process!) switched some entry without any oversight or review triggering hours of wasted effort on their and my side.

We can argue all day long if these screw ups are due to bad processes or bad data, but in all reality, even processes are triggered from some sort of underlying event, which is something as mundane as a database field’s flag being updated when your last purchase puts you in a new marketing segment.

Now imagine you get married and you wife changes her name. With all these company internal (CRM, Billing, ERP),  free public (property tax), commercial (credit bureaus, mailing lists) and social media data sources out there, you would think such everyday changes could get picked up quicker and automatically.  If not automatically, then should there not be some sort of trigger to kick off a “governance” process; something along the lines of “email/call the customer if attribute X has changed” or “please log into your account and update your information – we heard you moved”.  If American Express was able to detect ten years ago that someone purchased $500 worth of product with your credit card at a gas station or some lingerie website, known for fraudulent activity, why not your bank or insurer, who know even more about you? And yes, that happened to me as well.

Tell me about one of your “data-driven” horror scenarios?

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrintShare
Posted in Banking & Capital Markets, Business Impact / Benefits, Business/IT Collaboration, Complex Event Processing, Customer Acquisition & Retention, Customer Services, Customers, Data Aggregation, Data Governance, Data Privacy, Data Quality, Enterprise Data Management, Financial Services, Governance, Risk and Compliance, Healthcare, Master Data Management, Retail, Telecommunications, Uncategorized, Vertical | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

True Facts About Informatica RulePoint Real-Time Integration

Cabralia_computer_center

Shhhh… RulePoint Programmer Hard at Work

End of year.  Out with the old, in with the new.  A time where everyone gets their ducks in order, clears the pipe and gets ready for the New Year. For R&D, one of the gating events driving the New Year is the annual sales kickoff event where we present to Sales the new features so they can better communicate a products’ road map and value to potential buyers.  All well and good.  But part of the process is to fill out a Q and A that explains the product “Value Prop” and they only gave us 4 lines. I think the answer also helps determine speaking slots and priority.

So here’s the question I had to fill out -

FOR SALES TO UNDERSTAND THE PRODUCT BETTER, WE ASK THAT YOU ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTION:

WHAT IS THE PRODUCT VALUE PROPOSITION AND ARE THERE ANY SIGNIFICANT DEPLOYMENTS OR OTHER CUSTOMER EXPERIENCES YOU HAVE HAD THAT HAVE HELPED TO DEFINE THE PRODUCT OFFERING?

Here’s what I wrote:

Informatica RULEPOINT is a real-time integration and event processing software product that is deployed very innovatively by many businesses and vertical industries.  Its value proposition is that it helps large enterprises discover important situations from their droves of data and events and then enables users to take timely action on discovered business opportunities as well as stop problems while or before they happen.

Here’s what I wanted to write:

RulePoint is scalable, low latency, flexible and extensible and was born in the pure and exotic wilds of the Amazon from the minds of natives that have never once spoken out loud – only programmed.  RulePoint captures the essence of true wisdom of the greatest sages of yesteryear. It is the programming equivalent and captures what Esperanto linguistically tried to do but failed to accomplish.

As to high availability, (HA) there has never been anything in the history of software as available as RulePoint. Madonna’s availability only pales in comparison to RulePoint’s availability.  We are talking 8 Nines cubed and then squared ( ;-) ). Oracle = Unavailable. IBM = Unavailable. Informatica RulePoint = Available.

RulePoint works hard, but plays hard too.  When not solving those mission critical business problems, RulePoint creates Arias worthy of Grammy nominations. In the wee hours of the AM, RulePoint single-handedly prevented the outbreak and heartbreak of psoriasis in East Angola.

One of the little known benefits of RulePoint is its ability to train the trainer, coach the coach and play the player. Via chalk talks? No, RulePoint uses mind melds instead.  Much more effective. RulePoint knows Chuck Norris.  How do you think Chuck Norris became so famous in the first place? Yes, RulePoint. Greenpeace used RulePoint to save dozens of whales, 2 narwhal, a polar bear and a few collateral penguins (the bear was about to eat the penguins).  RulePoint has been banned in 16 countries because it was TOO effective.  “Veni, Vidi, RulePoint Vici” was Julius Caesar’s actual quote.

The inspiration for Gandalf in the Lord of the Rings? RulePoint. IT heads worldwide shudder with pride when they hear the name RulePoint mentioned and know that they acquired it. RulePoint is stirred but never shaken. RulePoint is used to train the Sherpas that help climbers reach the highest of heights. RulePoint cooks Minute rice in 20 seconds.

The running of the bulls in Pamplona every year -  What do you think they are running from? Yes,  RulePoint. RulePoint put the Vinyasa back into Yoga. In fact, RulePoint will eventually create a new derivative called Full Contact Vinyasa Yoga and it will eventually supplant gymnastics in the 2028 Summer Olympic games.

The laws of physics were disproved last year by RulePoint.  RulePoint was drafted in the 9th round by the LA Lakers in the 90s, but opted instead to teach math to inner city youngsters. 5 years ago, RulePoint came up with an antivenin to the Black Mamba and has yet to ask for any form of recompense. RulePoint’s rules bend but never break. The stand-in for the “Mind” in the movie “A Beautiful Mind” was RulePoint.

RulePoint will define a new category for the Turing award and will name it the 2Turing Award.  As a bonus, the 2Turing Award will then be modestly won by RulePoint and the whole category will be retired shortly thereafter.  RulePoint is… tada… the most interesting software in the world.

But I didn’t get to write any of these true facts and product differentiators on the form. No room.

Hopefully I can still get a primo slot to talk about RulePoint.

 

And so from all the RulePoint and Emerging Technologies team, including sales and marketing, here’s hoping you have great holiday season and a Happy New Year!

 

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrintShare
Posted in Big Data, Business Impact / Benefits, Business/IT Collaboration, CIO, Complex Event Processing, Data Integration Platform, Operational Efficiency, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Understand Customer Intentions To Manage The Experience

I recently had a lengthy conversation with a business executive of a European telco.  His biggest concern was to not only understand the motivations and related characteristics of consumers but to accomplish this insight much faster than before.  Given available resources and current priorities this is something unattainable for many operators.

Unlike a few years ago – remember the time before iPad – his organization today is awash with data points from millions of devices, hundreds of device types and many applications.

What will he do next?

What will he do next?

One way for him to understand consumer motivation; and therefore intentions, is to get a better view of a user’s network and all related interactions and transactions.  This includes his family household, friends and business network (also a type of household).  The purpose of householding is to capture social and commercial relationships in a grouping of individuals (or businesses or both mixed together) in order to identify patterns (context), which can be exploited to better serve a customer a new individual product or bundle upsell, to push relevant apps, audio and video content.

Let’s add another layer of complexity by understanding not only who a subscriber is, who he knows and how often he interacts with these contacts and the services he has access to via one or more devices but also where he physically is at the moment he interacts.  You may also combine this with customer service and (summarized) network performance data to understand who is high-value, high-overhead and/or high in customer experience.  Most importantly, you will also be able to assess who will do what next and why.

Some of you may be thinking “Oh gosh, the next NSA program in the making”.   Well, it may sound like it but the reality is that this data is out there today, available and interpretable if cleaned up, structured and linked and served in real time.  Not only do data quality, ETL, analytical and master data systems provide the data backbone for this reality but process-based systems dealing with the systematic real-time engagement of consumers are the tool to make it actionable.  If you add some sort of privacy rules using database or application-level masking technologies, most of us would feel more comfortable about this proposition.

This may feel like a massive project but as many things in IT life; it depends on how you scope it.  I am a big fan of incremental mastering of increasingly more attributes of certain customer segments, business units, geographies, where lessons learnt can be replicated over and over to scale.  Moreover, I am a big fan of figuring out what you are trying to achieve before even attempting to tackle it.

The beauty behind a “small” data backbone – more about “small data” in a future post – is that if a certain concept does not pan out in terms of effort or result, you have just wasted a small pile of cash instead of the $2 million for a complete throw-away.  For example: if you initially decided that the central lynch pin in your household hub & spoke is the person, who owns the most contracts with you rather than the person who pays the bills every month or who has the largest average monthly bill, moving to an alternative perspective does not impact all services, all departments and all clients.  Nevertheless, the role of each user in the network must be defined over time to achieve context, i.e. who is a contract signee, who is a payer, who is a user, who is an influencer, who is an employer, etc.

Why is this important to a business? It is because without the knowledge of who consumes, who pays for and who influences the purchase/change of a service/product, how can one create the right offers and target them to the right individual.

However, in order to make this initial call about household definition and scope or look at the options available and sensible, you have to look at social and cultural conventions, what you are trying to accomplish commercially and your current data set’s ability to achieve anything without a massive enrichment program.  A couple of years ago, at a Middle Eastern operator, it was very clear that the local patriarchal society dictated that the center of this hub and spoke model was the oldest, non-retired male in the household, as all contracts down to children of cousins would typically run under his name.  The goal was to capture extended family relationships more accurately and completely in order to create and sell new family-type bundles for greater market penetration and maximize usage given new bandwidth capacity.

As a parallel track aside from further rollout to other departments, customer segments and geos, you may also want to start thinking like another European operator I engaged a couple of years ago.  They were trying to outsource some data validation and enrichment to their subscribers, which allowed for a more accurate and timely capture of changes, often life-style changes (moves, marriages, new job).  The operator could then offer new bundles and roaming upsells. As a side effect, it also created a sense of empowerment and engagement in the client base.

I see bits and pieces of some of this being used when I switch on my home communication systems running broadband signal through my X-Box or set-top box into my TV using Netflix and Hulu and gaming.  Moreover, a US cable operator actively promotes a “moving” package to help make sure you do not miss a single minute of entertainment when relocating.

Every time now I switch on my TV, I get content suggested to me.  If telecommunication services would now be a bit more competitive in the US (an odd thing to say in every respect) and prices would come down to European levels, I would actually take advantage of the offer.  And then there is the log-on pop up asking me to subscribe (or throubleshoot) a channel I have already subscribed to.  Wonder who or what automated process switched that flag.

Ultimately, there cannot be a good customer experience without understanding customer intentions.  I would love to hear stories from other practitioners on what they have seen in such respect

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrintShare
Posted in Business Impact / Benefits, Complex Event Processing, Customer Acquisition & Retention, Customer Services, Customers, Data Integration, Data Quality, Master Data Management, Profiling, Real-Time, Telecommunications, Vertical | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

History Repeats Itself Through Business Intelligence (Part 1)

History repeats

Unlike some of my friends, History was a subject in high school and college that I truly enjoyed.   I particularly appreciated biographies of favorite historical figures because it painted a human face and gave meaning and color to the past. I also vowed at that time to navigate my life and future under the principle attributed to Harvard professor Jorge Agustín Nicolás Ruiz de Santayana y Borrás that goes, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

So that’s a little ditty regarding my history regarding history.

Forwarding now to the present in which I have carved out my career in technology, and in particular, enterprise software, I’m afforded a great platform where I talk to lots of IT and business leaders.  When I do, I usually ask them, “How are you implementing advanced projects that help the business become more agile or effective or opportunistically proactive?”  They usually answer something along the lines of “this is the age and renaissance of data science and analytics” and then end up talking exclusively about their meat and potatoes business intelligence software projects and how 300 reports now run their business.

Then when I probe and hear their answer more in depth, I am once again reminded of THE history quote and think to myself there’s an amusing irony at play here.  When I think about the Business Intelligence systems of today, most are designed to “remember” and report on the historical past through large data warehouses of a gazillion transactions, along with basic, but numerous shipping and billing histories and maybe assorted support records.

But when it comes right down to it, business intelligence “history” is still just that.  Nothing is really learned and applied right when and where it counted – AND when it would have made all the difference had the company been able to react in time.

So, in essence, by using standalone BI systems as they are designed today, companies are indeed condemned to repeat what they have already learned because they are too late – so the same mistakes will be repeated again and again.

This means the challenge for BI is to reduce latency, measure the pertinent data / sensors / events, and get scalable – extremely scalable and flexible enough to handle the volume and variety of the forthcoming data onslaught.

There’s a part 2 to this story so keep an eye out for my next blog post  History Repeats Itself (Part 2)

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrintShare
Posted in Big Data, Complex Event Processing, Data Integration, Data Integration Platform, Data Warehousing, Real-Time, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Integration Gives You Muscle. Data Integration with Event Processing Gives You 6-Pack Abs.

6Packabs

Everyone knows that Informatica is the Data Integration company that helps organizations connect their disparate software into a cohesive and synchronous enterprise information system.  The value to business is enormous and well documented in the form of use cases, ROI studies and loyalty / renewal rates that are industry-leading.

Event Processing, on the other hand is a technology that has been around only for a few years now and has yet to reach Main Street in Systems City, IT.  But if you look at how event processing is being used, it’s amazing that more people haven’t heard about it.  The idea at its core (pun intended) is very simple – monitor your data / events – those things that happen on a daily, hourly, minute-ly basis and then look for important patterns that are positive or negative indicators, and then set up your systems to automatically take action when those patterns come up – like notify a sales rep when a pattern indicates a customer is ready to buy, or stop that transaction, your company is about to be defrauded.

Since this is an Informatica blog, then you probably have a decent set of “muscles” in place already and so why, you ask, would you need 6 pack abs?  Because 6 packs abs are a good indication of a strong musculature core and are the basis of a stable and highly athletic body.  It’s the same parallel for companies because in today’s competitive business environment, you need strength, stability, and agility to compete.  And since IT systems increasingly ARE the business, if your company isn’t performing as strong, lean, and mean as possible, then you can be sure your competitors will be looking to implement every advantage they can.

You may also be thinking why would you need something like Event Processing when you already have good Business Intelligence systems in place?  The reality is that it’s not easy to monitor and measure useful but sometimes hidden data /event / sensor / social media sources and also to discern which patterns have meaning and which patterns may be discovered as false negatives.  But the real difference is that BI usually reports to you after the fact when the value of acting on the situation has diminished significantly.

So while muscles are important to be able to stand up and run, and good quality, strong muscles are necessary to do heavy lifting, it’s those 6 pack abs on top of it all that give you the mean lean fighting machine to identify significant threats and opportunities amongst your data, and in essence, to better compete and win.

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrintShare
Posted in CIO, Complex Event Processing, Data Integration, Data Integration Platform, Operational Efficiency, Real-Time | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Usefulness of Things

As a Tesla owner, I recently had the experience of calling Tesla service after a yellow warning message appeared on the center console of my car.” Check tire pressure system.  Call Tesla Service.” While still on the freeway, I voice dialed Tesla with my iPhone and was in touch with a service representative within minutes.

Me: A yellow warning message just appeared on my dash and also the center console.

Tesla rep: Yes, I see – is it the tire pressure warning?

Me: Yes – do I need to pull into a gas station?  I haven’t had to visit a gas station since I purchased the car.

Tesla rep:  Well, I also see that you are traveling on a freeway that has some steep elevation – it’s possible the higher altitude is affecting your car’s tires temporarily until the pressure equalizes.  Let me check your tire pressure monitoring sensor in a half hour.  If the sensor still detects a problem, I will call you and give further instructions.

As it turned out, the warning message disappeared after ten minutes and everything was fine for the rest of the trip. However, the episode served as a reminder that the world will be much different with the advent of the Internet of Things. Just as humans connected with mobile phones become more productive, machines and devices connected to the network become more useful. In this case, a connected automobile allowed the remote service rep to remotely access vehicle data, read the tire pressure sensor as well as the vehicle location/elevation and was able to suggest a course of action. This example is fairly basic compared to the opportunities afforded by networked devices/machines.

In addition to remote servicing, there are several other use case categories that offer great potential, including:

  • Preventative Maintenance – monitor usage data and increase the overall uptime for machines/devices while decreasing the cost of upkeep. e.g., Tesla runs remote diagnostics on vehicles and has the ability to identify vehicle problems before they occur.
  • Realtime Product Enhancements – analyze product usage data and deliver improvements quickly in response. e.g., Tesla delivers software updates that improve the usability of the vehicle based on analysis of owner usage.
  • Higher Efficiency in Business Operations – analyze consolidated enterprise transaction data with machine data to identify opportunities to achieve greater operational efficiency. e.g., Tesla deployed waves of new fast charging stations (known as superchargers) based upon analyzing the travel patterns of its vehicle owners.
  • Differentiated Product/Service Offerings – deliver new class of applications that operate on correlated data across a broad spectrum of sources (HINT for Tesla: a trip planning application that estimates energy consumption and recommends charging stops would be really cool…)

In each case, machine data is integrated with other data (traditional enterprise data, vehicle owner registration data, etc.) to create business value. Just as important to the connectivity of the devices and machines is the ability to integrate the data. Several Informatica customers have begun investing in M2M (aka Internet of Things) infrastructure and Informatica technology has been critical to their efforts. US Xpress utilizes mobile censors on its vast fleet of trucks and Informatica delivers the ability to consolidate, cleanse and integrate the data they collect.

My recent episode with Tesla service was a simple, yet eye-opening experience. With increasingly more machines and devices getting wireless connected and the ability to integrate the tremendous volumes of data being generated, this example is only a small hint of more interesting things to come.

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrintShare
Posted in Cloud Computing, Complex Event Processing, Data Aggregation, Data Integration | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Get Your Data Butt Off The Couch and Move It

Data is everywhere.  It’s in databases and applications spread across your enterprise.  It’s in the hands of your customers and partners.  It’s in cloud applications and cloud servers.  It’s on spreadsheets and documents on your employee’s laptops and tablets.  It’s in smartphones, sensors and GPS devices.  It’s in the blogosphere, the twittersphere and your friends’ Facebook timelines. (more…)

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrintShare
Posted in Application ILM, B2B, Big Data, Cloud Computing, Complex Event Processing, Data Governance, Data Integration, Data Migration, Data Quality, Data Services, Data Transformation, Data Warehousing, Enterprise Data Management, Integration Competency Centers | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Informatica World Healthcare Path

Join us this year at Informatica World!

We have a great line up of speakers and events to help you become a data driven healthcare organization… I’ve provided a few highlights below:

Participate in the Informatica World Keynote sessions with Sohaib Abbasi and Rick Smolan who wrote “The Human Face of Big Data”  — learn more via this quick YouTube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7K5d9ArRLJE&feature=player_embedded

With more than 100 interactive and in-depth breakout sessions, spanning 6 different tracks, (Platform & Products, Architecture, Best Practices, Big Data, Hybrid IT and Tech Talk), Informatica World is an excellent way to ensure you are getting the most from your Informatica investment. Learn best practices from organizations who are realizing the potential of their data like: Ochsner Health, Sutter Health, UMass Memorial, Qualcomm and Paypal.

Finally, we want you to balance work with a little play… we invite you to network with industry peers at our Healthcare Cocktail Reception on the evening of Wednesday, June 5th and again during our Data Driven Healthcare Breakfast Roundtable on Thursday, June 6th.

See you there!

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrintShare
Posted in Application Retirement, B2B, Complex Event Processing, Data Integration, Data Integration Platform, Data masking, Data Migration, Data Warehousing, Healthcare, Informatica Events, Master Data Management, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Some Things Change and Some Things Stay the Same

I joined Informatica five months ago — it didn’t seem like the “I’m new here card” kept things slow for very long and now, being four weeks from HIMSS, I’m in the middle of a familiar flurry activity. Each year, I am reminded that times change, the location changes, where I am working may shift but some things stay the same. At the top of the stay the same list is the passion we all have for healthcare IT… oh, and the familiar faces I look forward to reconnecting with!

Let me tell you a bit about what we have planned for HIMSS 2013. In the coming weeks, we will make exciting product announcements so watch this space. As a precursor, download our latest whitepaper on Healthcare Data Management.

Next, and probably the highlight that I am most excited about, we have one of our customers joining us during the conference. With a prominent NOLA presence, Jonathan Stevenson, Director of Analytics at Ochsner Health System, will be in our booth. Jonathan will share the Ochsner analytics vision and accomplishments. Ochnser relied on the Informatica Platform to migrate data from 38 clinical applications into Epic and then designated Informatica as their enterprise integration platform. As they enter the next phase of their analytics journey, the platform plays a key role in enabling business, clinical and IT collaboration with the ability to streamline development and improve confidence through improved data quality.

We are also excited to increase our booth presence this year and with two partners joining us to exhibit their solutions. The first being HighPoint Solutions and the second being announced closer to the show. Together we will demonstrate joint offerings and examples of innovations in healthcare.

 HIMSS would not be complete without social events. One in particular that I want to mention is a meet and greet reception, Monday, March 4th 6:00pm-8:00pm; we are co-sponsoring with dbMotion. If you’d like to attend, contact us via jshafer@informatica.com. If you can’t meet us at our booth, please let us know and we’ll be happy to arrange a separate time to meet.

Watch this Ochnsner YouTube video and then stop by booth 5005 and learn how Informatica can help you to unlock the potential of your data. Stop by to find out how you can win daily cash prize giveaways.

As always, please feel free to post comments or questions.

FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrintShare
Posted in Big Data, Complex Event Processing, Customers, Data Integration, Data Integration Platform, Data Migration, Healthcare | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment