Category Archives: Cloud Data Integration

Cloud Data Integration

5 Ways Hybrid Integration Redefines Your Cloud Strategy

Hybrid CloudThe mainstream use of SaaS applications as part of the cloud strategies in many enterprises continues to rise. Initially led by LOB IT (lines of business, apps IT), SaaS deployments now have central IT (such as Integration Competency Centers) personnel extensively involved. This shift stems from the need to develop strategies around hybrid application deployments – environments that include integrations between cloud and on-premise applications.

The entire breadth of cloud-to-cloud and cloud-to-ground integration scenarios necessitates interacting with the publicly available APIs, cloud services, and internal web services. The end goal is to enable secure, consistent data access on enterprise apps wherein any cloud, or on-premise application is accessible through a tablet or smartphone, in an intuitive, easy-to-use interface.

A key necessity for hybrid application deployments is the concept of “adaptive integration” within any integration platform-as-a-service (iPaaS). Any cloud service integration that claims to have iPaaS capabilities needs to have integration features that connect data, applications, and processes, as well as have governance and API management functionality. The iPaaS must also run on a multi-tenant infrastructure and be available on-premise at times.

You can learn more about adaptive integration, how the iPaaS impacts it, and hybrid application strategies in our recorded webinar, Enabling Hybrid Application Strategies through Cloud Service Integration, featuring Gartner Vice-President and Fellow, Massimo Pezzini, and Informatica Senior Vice-President of Data Integration, Ash Kulkarni. Key topics covered will include:

  • How SaaS adoption is driving the need for hybrid integration
  • Why the mobilization of the enterprise means a stricter criteria for an iPaaS
  • How Everton Football Club in the English Premier League gained major customer insights by using Informatica Cloud
  • What “Adaptive Integration” and the Internet of Things have in store for us
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Posted in Cloud, Cloud Application Integration, Cloud Data Integration, Cloud Data Management | Leave a comment

The State of Salesforce Report: Trends, Data, and What’s Next

A guest post by Jonathan Staley, Product Marketing Manager at Bluewolf Beyond, a consulting practice focused on innovating live cloud environments.

Guest blogger Jonathan Staley

Guest blogger Jonathan Staley

Now in its third year (2012, 2013), The State of Salesforce Annual Review continues to be the most comprehensive report on the Salesforce ecosystem. Based on the data from over 1,000 global Salesforce users, this report highlights how companies are using the Salesforce platform, where resources are being allocated, and where industry hype meets reality. Over the past three years, the report has evolved much like the technology, shifting and transforming to address recent advancements, and well as tracking longitudinal trends in the space.

We’ve found that key integration partners like Informatica Cloud continue to grow in importance within the Salesforce ecosystem. Beyond the core platform offerings from Salesforce, third-party apps and integration technologies have received considerable attention as companies look to extend the value of their initial investments and unite systems. The need to sync multiple platforms and applications is an emerging need in the Salesforce ecosystem—which will be highlighted in the 2014 report.

As Salesforce usage expands, so does our approach to survey execution. In line with this evolution, here’s what we’ve learned over the last three years from data collection:

Functions, Departments Make a Difference

Sales, Marketing, IT, and Service all have their own needs and pain points. As Salesforce moves quickly across the enterprise, we want to recognize the values, priorities, and investments by each department. Not only are the primary clouds for each function at different stages of maturity, but the ways in which each department uses their cloud are unique. We anticipate discovery of how enterprises are collaborating across functions and clouds.

Focus on Region

As our international data set continues to grow we are investing in regionalized reports for the US, UK, France, and Australia. While we saw indications of differences between each region in last year’s survey, they were not statistically significant.

Customer Engagement is a Top Priority

Everyone agrees that customer engagement is important, but what are companies actually doing about it? A section on predictive analytics and questions about engagement specific to departments has been included in this year’s survey. We suspect that the recent trend of companies empowering employees with a combination of data and mobile will be validated in the survey results.

Variation Across Industries

As an added bonus, we will build a report targeting specific insights from the Financial Services industry.

We Need Your Help

Our dataset depends on input from Salesforce users spanning all functions, roles, industries, and regions. Every response matters. Please take 15 minutes to share your Salesforce experiences, and you will receive a personalized report, comparing your responses to the aggregate survey results.

Click the Banner to take the Survey

Click the Banner to take the Survey

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Posted in Cloud, Cloud Application Integration, Cloud Computing, Cloud Data Integration, Cloud Data Management, SaaS | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

From the Ashes of SOA: Service-Oriented Integration for the Hybrid App World

Service-Oriented Integration

Service-Oriented Integration for the Hybrid App World

History is full of instances where a new technology or idea seemingly arrives before its time and has difficulty taking hold because the organizational, cultural or technological foundation simply isn’t there to support it. One such infamous case I keep coming back to is the spectacular rise and gradual fall from grace of SOA. It’s been over five years since Ann Thomas Manes put a nail in its coffin with her provocative (and widely interpreted) SOA obituary. Ann’s point was simple: SOA as “an acronym” got in the way. Too much time was devoted to technology debates (e.g., ‘what’s the best ESB?’ or ‘WS-* vs. REST’), and everyone missed the important issue: architecture and services.

SOA was born out of purposeful intent, to solve a specific problem in a particularly novel way: standards-based and interoperable service-based integration driven by the WS-* standardization efforts. It foreshadowed the fragmentation of the monolithic on-premise software providers and pre-dated the rise of a new cloud-centric world – and it arguably arrived too fast for many organizations to take advantage of it on-premise. The constant churn of WS-* specifications didn’t help the cause either.

Some IT shops got bogged down in religious arguments over WS-* vs. REST while others pushed on, bolting on service interfaces to existing application stacks and protocols and building new service infrastructure as an investment for the future. The result, as we all know, was a lot of hype and dashed expectations for some.

Fast forward five years, and the future foreshadowed by SOA is almost a reality. And while SOA (the acronym) may be dead, the need for a service-oriented architecture is very much alive.

We now live in a hybrid world, populated by cloud, social and on-premise applications, and the move to the cloud for business is a fait accompli — or at the least, inevitable. Cloud initiatives are fueling a new type of service-oriented integration – one where, unlike in the past, the approach is no longer strictly defined by protocols but rather by application services and event-based integration.

In this new world, IT no longer controls the architecture of the apps its business users use (or where they execute), and so consumers and providers – cloud apps, on-premise apps and systems – need to interact in loosely-coupled service-oriented ways. This evolution forces new integration realities that had for many been hidden from sight and kept within the domain of application owners.

Eight or nine years ago, when SOA fever was at its height, everyone was running around trying to transform their internal systems and build new and complex infrastructure to meet an incomplete technological imperative.

Today, the landscape has completely changed. The need for ESBs and tightly coupled integrations that expose the innards of your infrastructure no longer apply. Eventually, as applications move to the Cloud, there will no longer be much infrastructure left to expose. Instead, the integrations are and will increasingly be occurring in the cloud, over an open framework, through high-level service-centric APIs.

At Informatica, we’ve taken the lessons and imperatives of SOA – simplicity, data consistency and accessibility and security – and incorporated it into a platform that makes the promise of service-oriented, hybrid, event-driven integration a reality.

We’ve innovated, and now deliver tooling that both enables technically savvy application owners to implement integrations themselves and IT to assist. And we’ve also made it possible for application owners to consume data and business services and processes in an intuitive user interface that abstracts the underlying details of our hybrid integration platform.

The result is an integration platform that empowers application owners. This is what makes what we’re currently doing at Informatica Cloud so particularly exciting, and potentially disruptive.

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How Parallel Data Loading and Amazon Redshift Redefine Data Warehousing Performance

As Informatica Cloud product managers, we spend a lot of our time thinking about things like relational databases. Recently, we’ve been considering their limitations, and, specifically, how difficult and expensive it is to provision an on-premise data warehouse to handle the petabytes of fluid data generated by cloud applications and social media.  As a result, companies have to often make tradeoffs and decide which data is worth putting into their data warehouse.

Certainly, relational databases have enormous value. They’ve been around for several decades and have served as a bulwark for storing and analyzing structured data. Without them, we wouldn’t be able to extract and store data from on-premise CRM, ERP and HR applications and push it downstream for BI applications to consume.

With the advent of cloud applications and social media however, we are now faced with managing a daily barrage of massive amounts of rapidly changing data, as well as the complexities of analyzing it within the same context as data from on-premise applications. Add to that the stream of data coming from Big Data sources such as Hadoop which then needs to be organized into a structured format so that various correlation analyses can be run by BI applications – and you can begin to understand the enormity of the problem.

Up until now, the only solution has been to throw development resources at legacy on-premise databases, and hope for the best. But given the cost and complexity, this is clearly not a sustainable long-term strategy.

As an alternative, Amazon Redshift, a petabyte-scale data warehouse service in the cloud has the right combination of performance and capabilities to handle the demands of social media and cloud app data, without the additional complexity or expense. Its Massively Parallel Processing (MPP) architecture allows for the lightning fast loading and querying of data. It also features a larger block size, which reduces the number of I/O requests needed to load data, and leads to better performance.

By combining Informatica Cloud with Amazon Redshift’s parallel loading architecture, you can make use of push-down optimization algorithms, which process data transformations in the most optimal source or target database engines. Informatica Cloud also offers native connectivity to cloud and social media apps, such as Salesforce, NetSuite, Workday, LinkedIn, and Twitter, to name a few, which makes it easy to funnel data from these apps into your Amazon Redshift cluster at faster speeds.

If you’re at the Amazon Web Services Summit today in New York City, then you heard our announcement that Informatica Cloud is offering a free 60-day trial for Amazon Redshift with no limitations on the number of rows, jobs, application endpoints, or scheduling. If you’d like to learn more, please visit our Redshift Trial page or go directly to the trial.

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6 Steps to Petabyte-Scale Cloud Data Warehousing with Amazon Redshift and Informatica Cloud

Getting started with Cloud Data Warehousing using Amazon Redshift is now easier than ever, thanks to the Informatica Cloud’s 60-day trial for Amazon Redshift. Now, anyone can easily and quickly move data from any on-premise, cloud, Big Data, or relational data sources into Amazon Redshift without writing a single line of code and without being a data integration expert. You can use Informatica Cloud’s six-step wizard to quickly replicate your data or use the productivity-enhancing cloud integration designer to tackle more advanced use cases, such as combining multiple data sources into one Amazon Redshift table. Existing Informatica PowerCenter users can use Informatica Cloud and Amazon Redshift to extend an existing data warehouse with through an affordable and scalable approach. If you are currently exploring self-service business intelligence solutions such as Birst, Tableau, or Microstrategy, the combination of Redshift and Informatica Cloud makes it incredibly easy to prepare the data for analytics by any BI solution.

To get started, execute the following steps:

  1. Go to http://informaticacloud.com/cloud-trial-for-redshift and click on the ‘Sign Up Now’ link
  2. You’ll be taken to the Informatica Marketplace listing for the Amazon Redshift trial. Sign up for a Marketplace account if you don’t already have one, and then click on the ‘Start Free Trial Now’ button
  3. You’ll then be prompted to login with your Informatica Cloud account. If you do not have an Informatica Cloud username and password, register one by clicking the appropriate link and fill in the required details
  4. Once you finish registration and obtain your login details, download the Vibe ™ Secure Agent to your Amazon EC2 virtual machine (or to a local Windows or Linux instance), and ensure that it can access your Amazon S3 bucket and Amazon Redshift cluster.
  5. Ensure that your S3 bucket, and Redshift cluster are both in the same availability zone
  6. To start using the Informatica Cloud connector for Amazon Redshift, create a connection to your Amazon Redshift nodes by providing your AWS Access Key ID and Secret Access Key, specifying your cluster details, and obtaining your JDBC URL string.

You are now ready to begin moving data to and from Amazon Redshift by creating your first Data Synchronization task (available under Applications). Pick a source, pick your Redshift target, map the fields, and you’re done!

The value of using Informatica Cloud to load data into Amazon Redshift is the ability of the application to move massive amounts of data in parallel.  The Informatica engine optimizes by moving processing close to where the data is using push-down technology.  Unlike other data integration solutions for Redshift that perform batch processing using an XML engine which is inherently slow when processing large data volumes and don’t have multitenant architectures that scale well, Informatica Cloud processes over 2 billion transactions every day.

Amazon Redshift has brought agility, scalability, and affordability to petabyte-scale data warehousing, and Informatica Cloud has made it easy to transfer all your structured and unstructured data into Redshift so you can focus on getting data insights today, not weeks from now.

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