Krupa Natarajan

Krupa Natarajan
Krupa is Director of Product Management for Informatica Cloud. Prior to joining Informatica, Krupa led Product Management, Engineering and Customer Success for IBM’s Applications On Demand business. At IBM, Krupa was one of only 4 nominated presenters at IBM’s Venture Capital Symposium 2006 where she presented a visionary paper on ‘On Demand Provisioning automation on Virtualized Cloud’. Krupa has had several roles in Product Management, Engineering Management, Customer Success and Application architecture in a career spanning IBM, Corio Technologies, Kuokoa networks – an early stage networking startup and Wipro technologies. Krupa enjoys being a technologist and following the Cloud & data evolution. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from acclaimed National Institute of Technology, India. Besides technology, Krupa enjoys being outdoors, trekking, camping and traveling.

Cloud Designer and Dynamic Rules Linking in Informatica Cloud Spring 2014

Informatica Cloud Spring 2014: Advanced Integration, Simplified for All! Once upon a time, database schema changes were rare and handled with scrutiny. The stability of source data led to the development of the traditional Data Integration model. In this traditional model, a developer pulled a fixed number of source fields into an integration, transformed these fields, and then mapped the data into appropriate target fields.
The world of data has profoundly changed. Today’s Cloud applications allow an administrator to add custom fields to an object at a moment’s notice. Because source data is increasingly malleable, the traditional Data Integration model is no longer optimal. The Data Integration model must evolve.

Today’s integrations must dynamically adapt to ever-changing environments. (Webinar HERE)

To meet these demands, Informatica has built the Informatica Cloud Mapping Designer. The Mapping Designer provides power and adaptability to integrations through the “link rules” and “incoming field rules” features. Integration developers no longer need to deal with fields on a one-by-one basis. Cloud Designer allows the integration developer to specify a set of dynamic “rules” that tell the mapping how fields need to be handled.

For example, the default rule is “Include all fields”, which is both simple and powerful. The “all fields” rule dynamically resolves to bring in as many fields as exist at the source at run time. Regardless of how many new fields the application developer or database administrator may have thrown in to the source after the integration was developed, this simple rule can bring in all the new fields into the integration dynamically. This exponentially increases developer productivity, as the integration developer is not making modifications just to keep up with changes to the integration endpoints. Instead, the integration is “future proofed”.

Link rules can be defined in combination using both “includes” and “excludes” criteria. The rules can be of four types:

  • Include or Exclude All fields
  • Include or Exclude Fields of a particular datatype (example: String, numeric, decimal, datetime, blob etc)
  • Include or Exclude Fields that fit a name pattern (example: any field that ends with “_c” or any field that starts with “Shipping_”)
  • Include or Exclude Fields by a particular name (example: “Id”, “Name” etc)

Any combination of the link rules can be put together to create sophisticated dynamic rules for fields to flow.

Each transformation in the integration can specify the set of rules that determine what fields flow into that particular transformation. For example, if I need all custom fields from a Salesforce source to flow into a target, I would simply “Include fields by name pattern : suffixed with ‘_c’” – which is the naming convention for custom field names in Salesforce.  In another example, If I need to perform standardization of date formats for all datetime fields in an expression, I can define a rule to “Include fields by datatype – datetime”.

The dynamic nature of the link rules is what empowers a mapping created in Informatica Cloud Designer to be easily converted into a highly reusable integration template through parameterization.

For example, the entire source object can be parameterized and the integration developer may focus on the core integration logic without having to worry about individual fields. For example I can build an integration for bringing data into a slowly changing dimension table in a datawarehouse and this integration can apply to any source object. When the integration is executed by substituting different source objects for the source parameter, the integration would work as expected since the logical rules can dynamically bring in the fields regardless of what the source object structure is. Now all of a sudden, an integration developer is only required to build one reusable integration template for replicating multiple objects to the datawarehouse and NOT dozens or even hundreds of such repeated integration mappings. Needless to say, maintenance is hugely optimized.

With the power of logically defining field propagation through an integration combined with the ability to parameterize just about any part of the integration logic, the Cloud Mapping Designer provides a unique and powerful platform for developing reusable end to end integration solutions (such as Opportunity to Order, Accounts load to Salesforce, SAP product catalog to Salesforce, File load to Amazon redshift etc). Such prebuilt end-to-end solutions or VIPs (Vibe Integration Packages) can be easily customized by any consuming customer to adapt to their unique environments and business needs by tweaking only certain configurations but largely reusing the core integration logic.

What could be better than building integrations… building far fewer integrations that are reusable and self-adapting

To learn more, join the upcoming Cloud Spring release Webinar on Thursday, March 13.

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