Gary Patterson

Gary Patterson
Gary leads product management for Informatica’s new data centric security project Secure@Source. He has worked in enterprise software for 15 years, and previously served in security product roles at Imperva and Symantec Data Loss Prevention. Gary received his bachelors from Rice University, his MBA from Wharton, and is a certified information systems security professional (CISSP).

Takeaways from the Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit (2014)

Last week I had the opportunity to attend the Gartner Security and Risk Management Summit. At this event, Gartner analysts and security industry experts meet to discuss the latest trends, advances, best practices and research in the space. At the event, I had the privilege of connecting with customers, peers and partners. I was also excited to learn about changes that are shaping the data security landscape.

Here are some of the things I learned at the event:

  • Security continues to be a top CIO priority in 2014. Security is well-aligned with other trends such as big data, IoT, mobile, cloud, and collaboration. According to Gartner, the top CIO priority area is BI/analytics. Given our growing appetite for all things data and our increasing ability to mine data to increase top-line growth, this top billing makes perfect sense. The challenge is to protect the data assets that drive value for the company and ensure appropriate privacy controls.
  • Mobile and data security are the top focus for 2014 spending in North America according to Gartner’s pre-conference survey. Cloud rounds out the list when considering worldwide spending results.
  • Rise of the DRO (Digital Risk Officer). Fortunately, those same market trends are leading to an evolution of the CISO role to a Digital Security Officer and, longer term, a Digital Risk Officer. The DRO role will include determination of the risks and security of digital connectivity. Digital/Information Security risk is increasingly being reported as a business impact to the board.
  • Information management and information security are blending. Gartner assumes that 40% of global enterprises will have aligned governance of the two programs by 2017. This is not surprising given the overlap of common objectives such as inventories, classification, usage policies, and accountability/protection.
  • Security methodology is moving from a reactive approach to compliance-driven and proactive (risk-based) methodologies. There is simply too much data and too many events for analysts to monitor. Organizations need to understand their assets and their criticality. Big data analytics and context-aware security is then needed to reduce the noise and false positive rates to a manageable level. According to Gartner analyst Avivah Litan, ”By 2018, of all breaches that are detected within an enterprise, 70% will be found because they used context-aware security, up from 10% today.”

I want to close by sharing the identified Top Digital Security Trends for 2014

  • Software-defined security
  • Big data security analytics
  • Intelligent/Context-aware security controls
  • Application isolation
  • Endpoint threat detection and response
  • Website protection
  • Adaptive access
  • Securing the Internet of Things
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Posted in Big Data, CIO, Data Governance, Data Privacy, Data Security, Governance, Risk and Compliance | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Power and Security of Exponential Data

The Power and Security of Exponential Data

The Power and Security of Exponential Data

I recently heard a couple different analogies for data. The first is that data is the “new oil.” Data is a valuable resource that powers global business. Consequently, it is targeted for theft by hackers. The thinking is this: People are not after your servers, they’re after your data.

The other comparison is that data is like solar power. Like solar power, data is abundant. In addition, it’s getting cheaper and more efficient to harness. The juxtaposition of these images captures the current sentiment around data’s potential to improve our lives in many ways. For this to happen, however, corporations and data custodians must effectively balance the power of data with security and privacy concerns.

Many people have a preconception of security as an obstacle to productivity. Actually, good security practitioners understand that the purpose of security is to support the goals of the company by allowing the business to innovate and operate more quickly and effectively. Think back to the early days of online transactions; many people were not comfortable banking online or making web purchases for fear of fraud and theft. Similar fears slowed early adoption of mobile phone banking and purchasing applications. But security ecosystems evolved, concerns were addressed, and now Gartner estimates that worldwide mobile payment transaction values surpass $235B in 2013. An astute security executive once pointed out why cars have brakes: not to slow us down, but to allow us to drive faster, safely.

The pace of digital change and the current proliferation of data is not a simple linear function – it’s growing exponentially – and it’s not going to slow down. I believe this is generally a good thing. Our ability to harness data is how we will better understand our world. It’s how we will address challenges with critical resources such as energy and water. And it’s how we will innovate in research areas such as medicine and healthcare. And so, as a relatively new Informatica employee coming from a security background, I’m now at a crossroads of sorts. While Informatica’s goal of “Putting potential to work” resonates with my views and helps customers deliver on the promise of this data growth, I know we need to have proper controls in place. I’m proud to be part of a team building a new intelligent, context-aware approach to data security (Secure@SourceTM).

We recently announced Secure@SourceTM during InformaticaWorld 2014. One thing that impressed me was how quickly attendees (many of whom have little security background) understood how they could leverage data context to improve security controls, privacy, and data governance for their organizations. You can find a great introduction summary of Secure@SourceTM here.

I will be sharing more on Secure@SourceTM and data security in general, and would love to get your feedback. If you are an Informatica customer and would like to help shape the product direction, we are recruiting a select group of charter customers to drive and provide feedback for the first release. Customers who are interested in being a charter customer should register and send email to SecureCustomers@informatica.com.

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