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Moving to the Cloud: 3 Data Integration Facts That Every Enterprise Should Understand

Cloud Data Integration

Cloud Data Integration

According to a survey conducted by Dimensional Research and commissioned by Host Analytics, “CIOs continue to grow more and more bullish about cloud solutions, with a whopping 92% saying that cloud provides business benefits, according to a recent survey. Nonetheless, IT execs remain concerned over how to avoid SaaS-based data silos.”

Since the survey was published, many enterprises have, indeed, leveraged the cloud to host business data in both IaaS and SaaS incarnations.  Overall, there seems to be two types of enterprises: First are the enterprises that get the value of data integration.  They leverage the value of cloud-based systems, and do not create additional data silos.  Second are the enterprises that build cloud-based data silos without a sound data integration strategy, and thus take a few steps backward, in terms of effectively leveraging enterprise data.

There are facts about data integration that most in enterprise IT don’t yet understand, and the use of cloud-based resources actually makes things worse.  The shame of it all is that, with a bit of work and some investment, the value should come back to the enterprises 10 to 20 times over.  Let’s consider the facts.

Fact 1: Implement new systems, such as those being stood up on public cloud platforms, and any data integration investment comes back 10 to 20 fold.  The focus is typically too much on cost and not enough on the benefit, when building a data integration strategy and investing in data integration technology.

Many in enterprise IT point out that their problem domain is unique, and thus their circumstances need special consideration.  While I always perform domain-specific calculations, the patterns of value typically remain the same.  You should determine the metrics that are right for your enterprise, but the positive values will be fairly consistent, with some varying degrees.

Fact 2: It’s not just about data moving from place-to-place, it’s also about the proper management of data.  This includes a central understanding of data semantics (metadata), and a place to manage a “single version of the truth” when it comes to dealing massive amounts of distributed data that enterprises must typically manage, and now they are also distributed within public clouds.

Most of those who manage enterprise data, cloud or no-cloud, have no common mechanism to deal with the meaning of the data, or even the physical location of the data.  While data integration is about moving data from place to place to support core business processes, it should come with a way to manage the data as well.  This means understanding, protecting, governing, and leveraging the enterprise data, both locally and within public cloud providers.

Fact 3: Some data belongs on clouds, and some data belongs in the enterprise.  Those in enterprise IT have either pushed back on cloud computing, stating that data outside the firewall is a bad idea due to security, performance, legal issues…you name it.  Others try to move all data to the cloud.  The point of value is somewhere in between.

The fact of the matter is that the public cloud is not the right fit for all data.  Enterprise IT must carefully consider the tradeoff between cloud-based and in-house, including performance, security, compliance, etc..  Finding the best location for the data is the same problem we’ve dealt with for years.  Now we have cloud computing as an option.  Work from your requirements to the target platform, and you’ll find what I’ve found: Cloud is a fit some of the time, but not all of the time.

 

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