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3 Ways to Sell Data Integration Internally

3 Ways to Sell Data Integration Internally

Selling data integration internally

So, you need to grab some budget for a data integration project, but know one understands what data integration is, what business problems it solves, and it’s difficult to explain without a white board and a lot of time.  I’ve been there.

I’ve “sold” data integration as a concept for the last 20 years.  Let me tell you, it’s challenging to define the benefits to those who don’t work with this technology every day.  That said, most of the complaints I hear about enterprise IT are around the lack of data integration, and thus the inefficiencies that go along with that lack, such as re-keying data, data quality issues, lack of automation across systems, and so forth.

Considering that most of you will sell data integration to your peers and leadership, I’ve come up with 3 proven ways to sell data integration internally.

First, focus on the business problems.  Use real world examples from your own business.  It’s not tough to find any number of cases where the data was just not there to make core operational decisions that could have avoided some huge mistakes that proved costly to the company.  Or, more likely, there are things like ineffective inventory management that has no way to understand when orders need to be place.  Or, there’s the go-to standard: No single definition of what a “customer” or a “sale” is amongst the systems that support the business.  That one is like back pain, everyone has it at some point.

Second, define the business case in practical terms with examples.  Once you define the business problems that exist due to lack of a sound data integration strategy and technologies, it’s time to put money behind those numbers.  Those in IT have a tendency to either way overstate, or way understate the amount of money that’s being wasted and thus could be saved by using data integration approaches and technology.  So, provide practical numbers that you can back-up with existing data.

Finally, focus on a phased approach to implementing your data integration solution.  The “Big Bang Theory” is a great way to define the beginning of the universe, but it’s not the way you want to define the rollout of your data integration technology.  Define a workable plan that moves from one small grouping of systems and databases to another, over time, and with a reasonable amount of resources and technology.  You do this to remove risk from the effort, as well as manage costs, and insure that you can dial lessons learned back into the efforts.  I would rather roll out data integration within an enterprises using small teams and more problem domains, than attempt to do everything within a few years.

The reality is that data integration is no longer optional for enterprises these days.  It’s required for so many reasons, from data sharing, information visibility, compliance, security, automation…the list goes on and on.  IT needs to take point on this effort.  Selling data integration internally is the first and most important step.  Go get ‘em.

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