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Is your social media investment hampered by your “data poverty”?

Why is nobody measuring the “bag of money” portion? Source: emediate.com

Why is nobody measuring the “bag of money” portion? Source: emediate.com

Recently, I talked with a company that had allocated millions of dollars for paid social media promotion. Their hope was that a massive investment in Twitter and Facebook campaigns would lead to “more eyeballs” for their online gambling sites. Although they had internal social media expertise, they lacked a comprehensive partnership with IT. In addition, they lacked a properly funded policy vision. As a result, when asked how much of their socially-driven traffic resulted in actual sales, their answer was a resounding “No Idea.” I attribute this to “data poverty.”

There is a key reason that they were unable to quantify the ROI of their promotion: Their business model is, by design, “data poor.”  Although a great deal of customer data was available to them, they didn’t elect to use it. They could have used available data to identify “known players” as well as individuals with “playing potential.” There was no law prohibiting them from acquiring this data. However, they were uncomfortable obtaining a higher degree of attribution beyond name, address, e-mail and age.  They feared that customers would view them as a commercial counterpart to the NSA. As a result, key data elements like net worth, life-time-value, credit risk, location, marital status, employment status, number of friends/followers and property value we not considered when targeting potential users on social media. So, though the Social Media team considered this granular targeting to be a “dream-come-true,” others within the organization considered it to be too “1984.”

In addition to a hesitation to leverage available data, they were also limited by their dependence on a 3rd party IT provider. This lack of self-sufficiency created data quality issues, which limited their productivity. Ultimately, this dependency prevented them from capitalizing on new market opportunities in a timely way.

It should have been possible for them to craft a multi-channel approach. They ought to have been able to serve up promoted Tweets, banner ads and mobile application ads. They should have been able to track the click-through, IP and timestamp information from each one. They should have been able to make a BCR for redeeming a promotional offer at a retail location.

Strategic channel allocation would certainly have triggered additional sales. In fact, when we applied click-through, CAC and conversion benchmarks to their available transactional information, we modeled over $8 million in additional sales and $3 million in customer acquisition cost savings. In addition to the financial benefits, strategic channel allocation would have generated more data (and resulting insights) about their prospects and customers than they had when they began.

But, because they were hesitant to use all the data available to them, they failed to capitalize on their opportunities. Don’t let this happen to you. Make a strategic policy change to become a data-driven company.

Beyond the revenue gains of targeted social marketing, there are other reasons to become a data-driven company. Clean data can help you correctly identify ideal channel partners. This company failed to use sufficient data to properly select and retain their partners.  Hundreds of channel partners were removed without proper, data-driven confirmation. Reasons for this removal included things like “death of owner,”“fire,” and “unknown”.  To ensure more thorough vetting, the company could have used data points like the owner’s age, past business endeavors and legal proceedings. They could also have have studied location-fenced attributes like footfall, click-throughs and sales cannibalization risk. In fact, when we modeled the potential overall annual savings, across all business scenarios, for becoming a data driven company, the potential savings amount approached $40 million dollars.

Would a $40 million dollar savings inspire you to invest in your data? Would that amount be enough to motivate you to acquire, standardize, deduplicate, link, hierarchically structure and enrich YOUR data? It’s a no brainer. But it requires a policy shift to make your data work for you. Without this, it’s all just “potential”.

Do you have stories about companies that recently switched from traditional operations to smarter, data-driven operations? If so, I’d love to hear from you.

Disclaimer: Recommendations and illustrations contained in this post are estimates only and are based entirely upon information provided by the prospective customer  and on our observations and benchmarks.  While we believe our recommendations and estimates to be sound, the degree of success achieved by the prospective customer is dependent upon a variety of factors, many of which are not under Informatica’s control and nothing in this post shall be relied upon as representative of the degree of success that may, in fact, be realized and no warranty or representation of success, either express or implied, is made.

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2 Responses to Is your social media investment hampered by your “data poverty”?

  1. Pingback: Omni-purpose MDM | Liliendahl on Data Quality

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