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History Repeats Itself Through Business Intelligence (Part 2)

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In a previous blog post, I wrote about when business “history” is reported via Business Intelligence (BI) systems, it’s usually too late to make a real difference.  In this post, I’m going to talk about how business history becomes much more useful when combined operationally and in real time.

E. P. Thompson, a historian pointed out that all history is the history of unintended consequences.  His idea / theory was that history is not always recorded in documents, but instead is ultimately derived from examining cultural meanings as well as the structures of society  through hermeneutics (interpretation of texts) semiotics and in many forms and signs of the times, and concludes that history is created by people’s subjectivity and therefore is ultimately represented as they REALLY live.

The same can be extrapolated for businesses.  However, the BI systems of today only capture a miniscule piece of the larger pie of knowledge representation that may be gained from things like meetings, videos, sales calls, anecdotal win / loss reports, shadow IT projects, 10Ks and Qs, even company blog posts ;-)   – the point is; how can you better capture the essence of meaning and perhaps importance out of the everyday non-database events taking place in your company and its activities – in other words, how it REALLY operates.

One of the keys to figuring out how businesses really operate is identifying and utilizing those undocumented RULES that are usually underlying every business.  Select company employees, often veterans, know these rules intuitively. If you watch them, and every company has them, they just have a knack for getting projects pushed through the system, or making customers happy, or diagnosing a problem in a short time and with little fanfare.  They just know how things work and what needs to be done.

These rules have been, and still are difficult to quantify and apply or “Data-ify” if you will. Certain companies (and hopefully Informatica) will end up being major players in the race to datify these non-traditional rules and events, in addition to helping companies make sense out of big data in a whole new way. But in daydreaming about it, it’s not hard to imagine business systems that will eventually be able to understand the optimization rules of a business, accounting for possible unintended scenarios or consequences, and then apply them in the time when they are most needed.  Anyhow, that’s the goal of a new generation of Operational Intelligence systems.

In my final post on the subject, I’ll explain how it works and business problems it solves (in a nutshell). And if I’ve managed to pique your curiosity and you want to hear about Operational Intelligence sooner, tune in to to a webinar we’re having TODAY at 10 AM PST. Here’s the link.

http://www.informatica.com/us/company/informatica-talks/?commid=97187

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One Response to History Repeats Itself Through Business Intelligence (Part 2)

  1. Pat Hennel says:

    “One of the keys to figuring out how businesses really operate is identifying and utilizing those undocumented RULES that are usually underlying every business. ”

    Being able to turn those undocumented rules into actual, actionable steps can make a big difference in company productivity. Some things you just can’t teach, but if there a few processes that your best employees do that you can analyze and push out organization wide suddenly every movement, every interaction, and every member of your team is maximizing their potential.

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