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What is In-Database Archiving in Oracle 12c and Why You Still Need a Database Archiving Solution to Complement It (Part 2)

In my last blog on this topic, I discussed several areas where a database archiving solution can complement or help you to better leverage the Oracle In-Database Archiving feature.  For an introduction of what the new In-Database Archiving feature in Oracle 12c is, refer to Part 1 of my blog on this topic.

Here, I will discuss additional areas where a database archiving solution can complement the new Oracle In-Database Archiving feature:

  • Graphical UI for ease of administration – In database archiving is currently a technical feature of Oracle database, and not easily visible or mange-able outside of the DBA persona.   This is where a database archiving solution provides a more comprehensive set of graphical user interfaces (GUI) that makes this feature easier to monitor and manage. 
  • Enabling application of In-Database Archiving for packaged applications and complex data models – Concepts of business entities or transactional records composed of related tables to maintain data and referential integrity as you archive, move, purge, and retain data, as well as business rules to determine when data has become inactive and can therefore be safely archived allow DBAs to apply this new Oracle feature to more complex data models.  Also, the availability of application accelerators (prebuilt metadata of business entities and business rules for packaged applications) enables the application of In-Database Archiving to packaged applications like Oracle E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft, Siebel, and JD Edwards

  • Data growth monitoring and analysis – available in some database archiving solution to enable monitoring and tracking of data growth trends and the identification of which tables, modules, and business entities are the largest and fastest growing to focus your ILM policies on.
  • Performance monitoring and analysis – also available in some database archiving solution —  allows Oracle administrators to easily and more meaningfully monitor and analyze database and application performance.  They can identify the root cause of performance issues, and from there, administrators can define smart partitioning policies to segment data (i.e. mark them as inactive) and monitor the impact of the policy on improving query performance.  This capability helps you to identify which set of records should potentially be “marked as inactive” and segmented.
  • Automatic purging of unused or aged data based on policies – database archiving solutions allow administrators to define ILM policies to automate the purging of records that are truly no longer used and have been in the inactive state for some time.
  • Optimal data organization, placement, and purging, leveraging Oracle partitioning – a database archiving solution like Informatica Data Archive is optimized to leverage Oracle partitioning to optimally move data to inactive tablespaces, and purge inactive data by dropping or truncating partitions.  All of these actions are automated based on policies, again eliminating the need for scripting by the DBA.
  • Extreme compression to reduce cost and storage capacity consumption – up to 98% (90%-95% on average) compression is available in some database archiving solutions as compared to the 30%-60% compression available in native database compression.
  • Compliance management – Enforcement of retention and disposal policies with the ability to apply legal holds on archived data are part of a comprehensive database archiving solution.
  • Central policy management, across heterogeneous databases – a database archiving solution helps you to manage data growth, improve performance, reduce costs, ensure compliance to retention regulations, and define and apply data management policies across multiple heterogeneous database types, beyond Oracle.
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