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Analytics-Casual Versus Analytics-Driven

Analytics
Analytics-Casual Versus Analytics-Driven

What does it take to be an analytics-driven business? That’s a question that requires a long answer. Recently, Gartner research director Lisa Kart took on this question, noting how the key to becoming an analytics-driven business.

So, the secret of becoming an analytics-driven business is to bust down the silos — easier than done, of course. The good news, as Kart tells it, is that one doesn’t need to be casting a wide net across the world in search of the right data for the right occasion. The biggest opportunities are with connecting the data you already have, she says.

Taking Kart’s differentiation of just-using-analytics versus analytics-driven culture a step further, hare is a brief rundown of how businesses just using analytics approach the challenge, versus their more enlightened counterparts:

Business just using analytics: Lots of data, but no one really understands how much is around, or what to do with it.

Analytics-driven business: The enterprise has a vision and strategy, supported from the top down, closely tied to the business strategy. Management also recognizes that existing data has great value to the business.

Business just using analytics: Every department does its own thing, with varying degrees of success.

Analytics-driven business: Makes connections between all the data – of all types — floating around the organization. For example, gets a cross-channel view of a customer by digging deeper and connecting the silos together to transform the data into something consumable.

Business just using analytics: Some people in marketing have been collecting customer data and making recommendations to their managers.

Analytics-driven business: Marketing departments, through analytics, engage and interact with customers, Kart says. An example would be creating high end, in-store customer experiences that gave customers greater intimacy and interaction.

Business just using analytics: The CFO’s staff crunches numbers within their BI tools and arrive at what-if scenarios.

Analytics-driven business: Operations and finance departments share online data to improve performance using analytics. For example, a company may tap into a variety of data, including satellite images, weather patterns, and other factors that may shape business conditions, Kart says.

Business just using analytics: Some quants in the organization pour over the data and crank out reports.

Analytics-driven business: Encourages maximum opportunities for innovation by putting analytics in the hands of all employees. Analytics-driven businesses recognize that more innovation comes from front-line decision-makers than the executive suite.

Business just using analytics: Decision makers put in report requests to IT for analysis.

Analytics-driven business: Decision makers can go to an online interface that enables them to build and display reports with a click (or two).

Business just using analytics: Analytics spits out standard bar charts, perhaps a scattergram.

Analytics-driven business: Decision makers can quickly visualize insights through 3D graphics, also reflecting real-time shifts.

Comments

  • Aditya

    Very good generic article.

    Please provide some real time examples also which will help us to develop better understanding.

    Thanks,
    Aditya Prakash