Cloud Integration Issues? Look to the Enterprise Architects

Cloud Integration and Enterprise Architects
Cloud Integration and Enterprise Architects
According to an article by Jan Stafford, “When enterprises adopt cloud computing, many of their legacy methods of software integration are instantly obsolete. Hanging on to old integration methods is like trying to fit square pegs into round holes…”

It’s true.  Data integration is a whole new game, compared to five years ago, or, in some organizations, five minutes ago.  The right approaches to data integration continue to evolve around a few principal forces: First, the growth of cloud computing, as pointed out by Stafford.  Second, the growing use of big data systems, and the emerging use of data as a strategic asset for the business.

These forces combine to drive us to the understanding that old approaches to data integration won’t provide the value that they once did.  As someone who was a CTO of three different data integration companies, I’ve seen these patterns change over the time that I was building technology, and that change has accelerated in the last 7 years.

The core opportunities lie with the enterprise architect, and their ability to drive an understanding of the value of data integration, as well as drive change within their organization.  After all, they, or the enterprises CTOs and CIOs (whomever makes decisions about technological approaches), are supposed to drive the organization in the right technical directions that will provide the best support for the business.  While most enterprise architects follow the latest hype, such as cloud computing and big data, many have missed the underlying data integration strategies and technologies that will support these changes.

“The integration challenges of cloud adoption alone give architects and developers a once in a lifetime opportunity to retool their skillsets for a long-term, successful career, according to both analysts. With the right skills, they’ll be valued leaders as businesses transition from traditional application architectures, deployment methodologies and sourcing arrangements.”

The problem is that, while most agree that data integration is important, they typically don’t understand what it is, and the value it can bring.  These days, many developers live in a world of instant updates.  With emerging DevOps approaches and infrastructure, they really don’t get the need, or the mechanisms, required to share data between application or database silos.  In many instances, they resort to coding interfaces between source and target systems.  This leads to brittle and unreliable integration solutions, and thus hurts and does not help new cloud application and big data deployments.

The message is clear: Those charged with defining technology strategies within enterprises need to also focus on data integration approaches, methods, patterns, and technologies.  Failing to do so means that the investments made in new and emerging technology, such as cloud computing and big data, will fail to provide the anticipated value.  At the same time, enterprise architects need to be empowered to make such changes.  Most enterprises are behind on this effort.  Now it’s time to get to work.