United States

Data First: Five Tips To Reduce the Risk of A Breach

Reduce the Risk of A Breach
Reduce the Risk of A Breach

This article was originally published on www.federaltimes.com

November – that time of the year. This year, November 1 was the start of Election Day weekend and the associated endless barrage of political ads. It also marked the end of Daylight Savings Time. But, perhaps more prominently, it marked the beginning of the holiday shopping season. Winter holiday decorations erupted in stores even before Halloween decorations were taken down. There were commercials and ads, free shipping on this, sales on that, singing, and even the first appearance of Santa Claus.

However, it’s not all joy and jingle bells. The kickoff to this holiday shopping season may also remind many of the countless credit card breaches at retailers that plagued last year’s shopping season and beyond. The breaches at Target, where almost 100 million credit cards were compromised, Neiman Marcus, Home Depot and Michael’s exemplify the urgent need for retailers to aggressively protect customer information.

In addition to the holiday shopping season, November also marks the next round of open enrollment for the ACA healthcare exchanges. Therefore, to avoid falling victim to the next data breach, government organizations as much as retailers, need to have data security top of mind.

According to the New York Times (Sept. 4, 2014), “for months, cyber security professionals have been warning that the healthcare site was a ripe target for hackers eager to gain access to personal data that could be sold on the black market. A week before federal officials discovered the breach at HealthCare.gov, a hospital operator in Tennessee said that Chinese hackers had stolen personal data for 4.5 million patients.”

Acknowledging the inevitability of further attacks, companies and organizations are taking action. For example, the National Retail Federation created the NRF IT Council, which is made up of 130 technology-security experts focused on safeguarding personal and company data.

Is government doing enough to protect personal, financial and health data in light of these increasing and persistent threats? The quick answer: no. The federal government as a whole is not meeting the data privacy and security challenge. Reports of cyber attacks and breaches are becoming commonplace, and warnings of new privacy concerns in many federal agencies and programs are being discussed in Congress, Inspector General reports and the media. According to a recent Government Accountability Office report, 18 out of 24 major federal agencies in the United States reported inadequate information security controls. Further, FISMA and HIPAA are falling short and antiquated security protocols, such as encryption, are also not keeping up with the sophistication of attacks. Government must follow the lead of industry and look for new and advanced data protection technologies, such as dynamic data masking and continuous data monitoring to prevent and thwart potential attacks.

These five principles can be implemented by any agency to curb the likelihood of a breach:

1. Expand the appointment and authority of CSOs and CISOs at the agency level.

2. Centralize the agency’s data privacy policy definition and implement on an enterprise level.

3. Protect all environments from development to production, including backups and archives.

4. Data and application security must be prioritized at the same level as network and perimeter security.

5. Data security should follow data through downstream systems and reporting.

So, as the season of voting, rollbacks, on-line shopping events, free shipping, Black Friday, Cyber Monday and healthcare enrollment begins, so does the time for protecting personal identifiable information, financial information, credit cards and health information. Individuals, retailers, industry and government need to think about data first and stay vigilant and focused.

This article was originally published on www.federaltimes.com. Please view the original listing here

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