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Government Cloud Data Integration: Some Helpful Advice

Government Cloud Data Integration
Government Cloud Data Integration
Recently, a study found that the Government Cloud Data Integration has not been extremely effective. This post will provide some helpful advice.

As covered in Loraine Lawson’s blog, MeriTalk surveyed federal government IT professionals about their use of cloud computing. As it turns out, “89 percent out of 153 surveyed expressed ‘some apprehension about losing control of their IT services,’ according to MeriTalk.”

Loraine and I agree that what the survey says about the government’s data integration, management, and governance, is that they don’t seem to be very good at cloud data management…yet. Some of the other gruesome details include:

  • 61 percent do not have quality, documented metadata.
  • 52 percent do not have well understood data integration processes.
  • 50 percent have not identified data owners.
  • 49 percent do not have known systems of record.

“Overall, respondents did not express confidence about the success of their data governance and management efforts, with 41 percent saying their data integration management efforts were some degree of ‘not successful.’ This lead MeriTalk to conclude, ‘Data integration and remediation need work.’”

The problem with the government is that data integration, data governance, data management, and even data security have not been priorities. The government has a huge amount of data to manage, and they have not taken the necessary steps to adopt the best practices and technology that would allow them to manage it properly.

Now that everyone is moving to the cloud, the government included, questions are popping up about the proper way to manage data within the government, from the traditional government enterprises to the public cloud. Clearly, there is much work to be done to get the government ready for the cloud, or even ready for emerging best practices around data management and data integration.

If the government is to move in the right direction, they must first come to terms with the data. This means understanding where the data is, what it does, who owns it, access mechanisms, security, governance, etc., and apply this understanding holistically to most of the data under management.

The problem within the government is that the data is so complex, distributed, and, in many cases, unique, that it’s difficult for the government to keep good track of the data. Moreover, the way the government does procurement, typically in silos, leads to a much larger data integration problem. I was working with government agencies that had over 5,000 siloed systems, each with their own database or databases, and most do not leverage data integration technology to exchange data.

There are ad-hoc data integration approaches and some technology in place, but nowhere close to what’s need to support the amount and complexity of data. Now that government agencies are looking to move to the cloud, the issues around data management are beginning to be better understood.

So, what’s the government to do? This is a huge issue that can’t be fixed overnight. There should be incremental changes that occur over the next several years. This also means allocating more resources to data management and data integration than has been allocated in the past, and moving it much higher up in the priorities lists.

These are not insurmountable problems. However, they require a great deal of focus before things will get better. The movement to the cloud seems to be providing that focus.

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